The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Rice Flour for dusting

probably34's picture
probably34

Rice Flour for dusting

I've noticed alot of recipes that require proofing baskets calling for rice flour for dusting the baskets. Does anyone know why it is preferable?

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Rice flour is like teflon; dough just doesn't stick to it.

Many bakers use a 50-50 mix of rice and AP flours - works quite well.

MichaelH's picture
MichaelH

your proofed loaf will not stick to a rice dusted basket; however, be careful not to let rice flour get on your counter top as you are handling the dough because seams will not seal if rice flour is on the dough surface. I learned this the hard way.

Michael

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

I also use 50-50 rice flour and bread flour for my banneton. It works really well, never have a problem of dough sticking, if I dust the banneton well enough.

Another point to add to Michael, don't dust the rice flour too much though, make sure you shake off any excess flour from the banetton. 

I had a first hand experience leaving too much flour in the banetton and my loaves came out a very hard crust (not in a good way of crackling crust)...and rice flour sticking all over the loaves, not a very nice looking with white flour all over.

Sue

http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/

 

bnom's picture
bnom

In addition to bread baking, rice flour prevents fresh pasta from sticking to itself or whatever you have it resting on; and it is a great flour for dusting greased cake/muffin tins.  

I keep a shaker of rice flour. Sometimes I mix it with semolina or AP but usually just straight.

WHT it works is a good question.  I don't know enough about the molecular properties of rice flour to give an answer.  But I suspect other "slippery" feeling starches like corn starch and potato starch would work as well as rice flour.  

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

bnom, I have always understood that the rice flour grains are like tiny ball bearings. I imagine cornstarch and other starches might get gummy and stick, but I have never tried them so that's just a guess, A.

bnom's picture
bnom

You may be right.  I seem to recall having used potato starch to keep fresh pasta from sticking, but my memory basically sucks.  I think its a matter of absorbing the moisture in the dough--wheat flour will absorb it, rice flour wont. Will have to try a little test of the starches...