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Two Similar, Yet Contrasting Formulae Using An Element of Dark Rye Flour

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ananda's picture
ananda

Two Similar, Yet Contrasting Formulae Using An Element of Dark Rye Flour

 


These are 2 batches of bread made in College on Thursday of this week.   I have 6 students entered for a bread competition for Young Baker of the Year, with Warburtons.   Their entries are as follows:



  • Nettle Bread - has some elements in common with the formula posted by Karin a few months back. See: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/18284/vinschgauer-bread-unique-alpine-flavor Includes cumin and coriander spices, plus a wheat levain as a pre-ferment

  • Raisin, Shallot and Hazelnut Bread - based on an idea from Richard Bertinet, this bread has a Biga Naturale, appropriate since the baker concerned is originally from Sicily. The shallots are reduced in oil, with a touch of balsamic vinegar and moscavado sugar and the hazelnuts are toasted and nibbed. Flour blend is 25% wholewheat and 75% strong white in total.

  • Pumpernickel - a determined effort to perfect a large Pumpernickel loaf [Black Bread] steamed for 16 hours in a Pullman Pan.

  • Seaweed and Lemon Bread - thanks Daisy_A, Jan Hedh and Richard Bertinet. The seaweed is wakame, which is soaked overnight. The dough has a pre-ferment with 75% hydration and white flour. The final dough has semolina and wholewheat flour added at 12.5% each, rest of flour total 75%, including the pre-ferment. Lemon zest to bring out the seaweed flavour. The wakame is cut into the mixed dough using a Scotch Cutter; quite a delicate operation. The loaf is shaped as a half lemon, and dusted with semolina to bring out an authentic colour

  • "Breakfast Bread" - using a wheat levain, the final dough contains fruit and nut museli, chopped dates and honey

  • Flaxseed Bread raised with a Barm - the barm is made from a dry stout from a local traditional brewer. The base for the recipe is Hamelman's flaxseed bread, and Dan Lepard's Barm bread praised by Shiao-Ping and Daisy_A.


 


I fervently hope all six students will go far.   The regional heat is on 15th October; prize being £250.   A National Bake-off is held in November, with a winning prize of £1000 plus an "apprenticeship" with Warburtons.


A rarity for me; 3 students in the bakery to practice; no other teaching commitments!   So I did some baking experiments of my own at the same time.   Here they are:


 



 


1.    Pain de Campagne [Wheat Levain]



Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Leaven

 

 

Carrs Special CC White Flour

31.3

940

Water

18.7

561

TOTAL

50

1501

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Leaven [from above]

50

1501

Carrs Special CC White Flour

60

1800

Shipton Dark Rye Flour

8.7

261

Salt

1.8

54

Water

46.7

1400

TOTAL

167.2

5016

 

 

Overall Hydration: 65.4%.   Pre-fermented Flour 31.3%

Method:

  • The leaven has been built over 2 days from stock, as it was needed for student production as well.
  • The dough was mixed in a 10 quart Spiral Mixer for 15 minutes. The machine has single speed and bowl direction, and the mix is wonderfully gentle. I find it important to add the water first, then flour and salt, and finally the leaven. I was very happy with the mixed dough quality; dough temperature 26°C.
  • Bulk proof, covered, ambient for 1 hour
  • Scale 5 loaves at 1kg each, and mould round. Place upside down in prepared bannetons. At this point I will confess that my bannetons often seem to stick, and I have to learn to use a combination of coarse semolina and dark rye flour to prevent this from happening. In the past I've used different flours for dust to differentiate loaves produced. I've now seen too many loaves spoilt to continue this practice!
  • I proved these loaves for around 3 to 3½ hours in a prover with gentle humidity, at around 30°C.

After tipping onto the peel and cutting, they were baked in my lovely deck oven on the sole, using steam.   Top heat was set at 6.5 and the bottom at 5, with the temperature pre-heated to a solid 240°C.   After 15 minutes I turned the heat down to 220°C.   I opened the damper after a further 10 minutes and baked out a further 5 minutes before unloading and cooling on wires.

2.   Pain de Siègle [Rye Sourdough]

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Shipton Dark Rye Flour

20

600

Water

20

600

TOTAL

40

1200

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from above]

40

1200

Carrs Special CC White Flour

80

2400

Salt

1.8

54

Water

46.7

1400

TOTAL

168.5

5054

Overall Hydration: 66.7%.   Pre-fermented Flour: 20%

Method:

  • Stock sourdough had been built over 2 days as for the first dough
  • The dough was mixed in a 10 quart upright mixer. Mixing times were 2 minutes on first speed and 6 minutes on third speed. Final dough temperature was 26°C.
  • Bulk proof as above, 1 hour.
  • Scale 3 loaves at 1kg and 4 at just over 500g. Mould round and place upside down in bannetons prepared with dark rye flour.
  • Proof as above for just under 3 hours.
  • Bake to the same profile given above.

 

Notes:

  • The rye sourdough ferments quicker, even though the amount of pre-fermented flour is lower. The stiff levain is so much mellower than the rye. All down to ash content and water levels, methinks!
  • These are unashamedly commercial recipes. I am so pleased with the end resulting breads. Great feedback from all the staff too; not always forthcoming from those with such expertise over various areas of food and hospitality!

Photos below: 

DSCF1408DSCF1410

DSCF1409

DSCF1411DSCF1412

DSCF1413DSCF1416

DSCF1417

All good wishes

Andy

Comments

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Andy,


This looks fantastic! Breads look great and so varied. Really wish the students well with this.


Thanks for acknowledgements. Look forward to seeing the lemon and seaweed bread - what a great combination. Have also just blogged on Art/Bread project I've been involved with.


The crusts and crumb of your own rye formulae look stunning.


Must have been a busy week?


With best wishes, Daisy_A

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Daisy_A


yes, this is the one all the chefs have focussed on too.   The idea is from Bertinet, but it's the student's work which impresses.   Only Week 2 of a bread course with me and he's already got the idea of the pre-ferment.   And mixing in the soaked wakame at the end is a pretty delicate operation.


Too busy in the classroom, and it just gets busier...


All good wishes


Andy

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Andy,


Sounds great - like your student is really in his element. I can't begin to imagine how delicate an operation it would be to mix in soaked seaweed. What is a scotch cutter by the way? I've googled it but I just get pictures of sellotape!


32 hours - the mind boggles. Have responded also on the blog post. I feel for you!


Best wishes, Daisy_A

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Daisy_A,


Scotch Cutter = Metal Cutter, see here: http://bakerybits.co.uk/Metal-Bladed-Dough-Cutter-P388393.aspx


A

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Andy,


Thanks. I have it now. Daisy_A

wally's picture
wally

Nothing 'commercial' to my mind with breads that are wholly levain based.  And certainly more flavor I have to believe than what the usual commercial breads yield.


You are certainly right about rye sourdoughs maturing more rapidly.  I've discovered mine has not only a voracious appetite, but an amazing ability to ferment anywhere from 3 - 4 hours faster than my while dough levain if I mix up both at the same time.


I'm guessing the small percentage of rye in your pain de campagne added a nice bit of complexity to the overall flavor.


Nice bakes!


Larry


 

ananda's picture
ananda

Many thanks Larry,


I said experimentation, for sure.   But, given a bakery, some fine flour and access to 2 kicking leavens, I'm realising it was scarcely experimental, in many ways.


The truth is in the eating actually.   Tomorrow's sandwiches, then!


But, yes: the rye sour at only 20% of the flour fermented quicker than the wheat at over 30%.


I live and work in the hope that these are the sorts of bread we will regularly see offered up as commercial fayre in the not too distant future...quite a challenge!


Nonetheless, I love the simplicity and balance in both formulae.


I see Daisy's pointing you to Borodinsky...go on, you know you want to!


Best wishes


Andy

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

I am especially interested in the rye bread. Haven't stopped my chase for the ideal sourdough rye yet. Good luck to those students!

ananda's picture
ananda

Keep up that chase txfarmer,


Larry seems to be setting the pace just now!


BW


Andy

Franko's picture
Franko

Wonderful looking loaves Andy!


While even though you say it's a commercial recipe, I haven't seen many commercial loaves looking quite as fine as yours. I'm sure your students will do well in the competition with your expertise to guide them. Great work Andy!


Franko

ananda's picture
ananda

Many thanks Franko.


Actually my students will do well if they are shortlisted.   So, I just hope those judging are pulled in by the recipes and formulae sent in, along with photographs.   There products are all just about spot-on; merely fine tuning from here.


As regards commercial recipes, I really cannot add a lot to what Daisy says below.   I've turned out loaves such as these by the 000 on a weekly basis.  It can be done, with the expertise Daisy references.   The other key factor is the same one you likely come up with day in day out....oven capacity!   Am I right?


Thanks again, and thanks Daisy; your note below is spot on!


Andy

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Andy,


Thanks returned! Daisy_A

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Andy,

Daisy makes a very astute observation that I completely missed in regards to 'commercial breads' and your formulae being accessible to smaller shops and production schedules.


Much as I'd love to make this bread at our shop, it's about 2hrs outside of our current production envelope...and probably always will be. It's a shame really because it's entirely do-able if our head office were to decide it should be so, and budgeted accordingly. If our current sales of the fake artisan style breads are any indication, there's definitely a consumer demand for this class of bread. Little doubt in my mind as to how  our customers would react to actually being able to pick up a loaf of the real thing while shopping at our store, instead of what we offer now.



As for oven space...is there ever really enough? We have 3 rack ovens capable of baking 320 pan loaves or 90+ hearth style simultaneously and I still wind up having periods of production time  where I have a lineup (although brief) of product waiting to go into the oven.


Franko

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Andy,


Can't help but agree with Franko and Larry that these are not 'commercial' loaves as we generally know them at present - if they were I'd be down the shops like a shot.


But I also think I see where you are coming from in terms of models for small scale artisan and other bakeries who wanted to move away from powdered levains and premixes, in that with the level of hydration and proofing times given these breads could be baked in a regular bakery shift, as long as the bakery was willing to keep a stock leaven. 


Seems to be a bit how the Loaf, Crich handles some of its breads - using pate fermentée. They provide the range of traditional English bread from tin to bloomer but report currently that 'Our sour dough range is fast becoming the most popular selection of breads that we produce' http://www.theloaf.co.uk/bread.htm


Using this model and getting involved in other community projects seems to have helped turn round a village bakery whose customer base had declined. 


They produce what looks like excellent bread but have come to baking from other professions and record that they had to work incredibly hard at the beginning to develop the bread formulae.


I can see how well it would work for a new bakery and/or bakery students to work with someone with your expertise to develop formulae such as these either in-house or as part of a training course. Is this the kind of ground Bakery 3 will cover?


With best wishes, Daisy_A

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Hi Andy, both very nice breads, but this time around I'm a bit undecided: better the pinkish color of one loaf or the very regular crumb or the other? In the doubt, may I have a slice of both? ;-)


 


Maybe you forgot to add the rye starter percentage in the sourdough build of the Pain de Siègle? Or did you just let ferment rye flour and water for 2 days without starter?


 


Nico

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Nico,


If you look at the bottom 3 rows of photos from the top down, they are as follows:


top left is Pain de Siegle, top right is Pain de Campagne


middle are both Pain de Campagne


bottom is Pain de Siegle.


I used a number of different settings on the camera, hence the different lighting.


As regards the leaven formula, I just gave an overall amount for flour and water in the built leavens.   Because I needed a large quantity for the students' work, and I wanted it to be active, I made sure both rye and wheat leavens were well-fed over a 2 day period.   So the build is not shown, but the proportions of flour and water in the built leavens remain accurate.   Hope this clarifies.


Pain de Siegle has just a gentle tang from the rye sour.   For a leaven at over 30%, the Pain de Campagne is very subtle indeed, and equally delicious.   So yes, I'd recommend a slice of both


Best wishes


Andy