The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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oskar270's picture
oskar270

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I only have one oven in my kitchen and when I make my breads I use the oven light to create the warm environment the bread requires to rise. The kitchens ambient temperature is about 72 F


However when the bread is in the last stage and has risen nicely, I have to leave the bread in the counter and wait about 10 to 15 minutes for my oven to reach the baking temperature and during this time the bread deflates, not a lot but enough to wonder for an alternative.


Any suggestions?


 

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

why bother putting the dough in the oven to rise?  That room temperature should be plenty to keep the dough happy.


The other thing that your description suggests is that the dough is over-proofing while it is in the oven.  You might want to try pulling it out earlier by, I dunno, 10-15 minutes.  It should be slightly underproofed when you start baking, which would keep it from collapsing while you preheat the oven and still allow for some oven spring during the bake.


Paul

flournwater's picture
flournwater

What he said ...

oskar270's picture
oskar270

Thank you, will follow this next time

cgmeyer2's picture
cgmeyer2

i've had good luck proofing dough at room temp. i usually cover the container w/ cotton kitchen towels. so far it has worked for me


claudia

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

You might find you actually like the cooler temps for rising better. The longer, slower rises seem to create better tasting breads. Unless you're really in a hurry see if you can slow your rises down by placing them in cool places to rise. Some of us even "retard" the rise by sticking it in the fridge or a cool basement/outside overnight.


Something to think about. You certainly don't need to use your oven light to get your dough to rise unless there is a reason to be in a hurry. Also, I use a closed plastic containe to keep my dough humid and to avoid drafts. This keeps it at a constant temperature. I do keep my sourdough a little warmer than my yeast doughs, depending on what I'm trying to accomplish.

oskar270's picture
oskar270

I just follow the recipes which call for a warm place and not knowing how warm is warm I used the oven light. Yesterday I baked another 2 loaves and I follow your suggestions; it rose nicely in the counter and I'm very happy I learned this one.


I also use closed clear plastic containers to keep my dough for the same reasons


Thank you for your time