The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

How to get seed toppings to stay on my loaf?

Agamemnonsmom's picture
Agamemnonsmom

How to get seed toppings to stay on my loaf?

I'm having trouble getting my seed toppings to stay on my bread once it's baked. When it's ready to bake, I sprayed my loaf with oil, put the seeds on lightly pressing the seeds, then sprayed again hoping they would stick. What's the trick to getting them to stay on?

 

 

mcs's picture
mcs

Brush an egg wash on right before it goes in the oven, sprinkle seeds, then score.  The seeds will be stuck on like 40 grit sandpaper.

-Mark

http://TheBackHomeBakery.com

sewcial's picture
sewcial

I am having the same problem. I hate to waste all those lovely seeds just to have them fall off of the baked loaf. I know about egg wash, but I have hesitated to use it because I thought it would keep the crust from being crunchy crispy? I do love the crunch of a good crust.

Catherine

Caltrain's picture
Caltrain

Egg washes gives you a harder, crispier, not to mention shinier, crust. You can also seal the the crust with a second wash about 5 minutes before the loaf comes out of the oven.

I like to beat an egg white with a pinch of salt and a tablespoon of water. It's worked great for bagels topped with anything from poppy seeds to mounds of chopped onions.

BobS's picture
BobS

I spray with water once, roll the loaf in the seeds, then spray again. Works for me.

 

Hamelman suggests rolling the loaf in a damp tea towel, then in the seeds.

 

 

sewcial's picture
sewcial

I use water, but they don't stick well after the loaf bakes, especially while slicing. Some seeds stay on, but a huge amount come off. Egg wash, in my experience, keeps the crust softer and I'm not sure the shine is what I want on my rustic breads. I guess I have used the egg mostly on sweet doughs, though, so, I'll give it a try once on less enriched dough and see how the crust is.

Catherine

yozzause's picture
yozzause

I use a paste which is made from either cornflour starch or arrow root powder, just 1/2 a teaspoon in a cup of water and bring to the boil it thickens to a paste.

when it has cooled a little brush onto the loaf top and sprinkle seeds or what ever. can be brushed onto a loaf without seed prior to baking it helps with oven spring as it keeps the outside skin moist for the short period of time that expansion takes place.

regards yozza

mcs's picture
mcs

One more thought (by me anyway) about the eggwash.  As mentioned above, an eggwash will create a shiny loaf - however if you steam it in addition to eggwash, it'll dull the shine. 

-Mark

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I have never had any trouble by spraying with water, sprinkling the seeds, pat lightly and cover for as long as possible with plastic wrap. The seeds help to prevent sticking but you can dust the plastic lightly with oil to eliminate any sticking.

If you are making a rustic loaf, you can proof top side up so this works well. After the loaf has sat for 30-45 minutes with the seeds on, slash and bake. The seeds are on to stay.

Eric

enaid's picture
enaid

I brush or spray my loaves with water and then sprinkle the seeds on, just before putting them in the oven.  A few always fall off when cutting the loaves, of course, but most stay on with no problem. Surely it's not a major calamity.  There's all sorts of alternative toppings if you're not happy with seeds.  I often make my bread with no topping, just spritz with water or milk.  The bread tastes just as good.  If you really want seeds, put them in the dough instead of on the top and enjoy seed bread! Why not!

Caltrain's picture
Caltrain

Because a seed on the crust is worth two in the dough. ;)

IMO, seeds influence taste more on top than in the dough. There's nothing wrong with seeded bread, but the taste is just not the same!

enaid's picture
enaid

This is not my posting.  Is someone else using the user name pollyanna?

marils's picture
marils

There is a product by King Arthur Flour company called Quick Shine.  It is specifically made for making bread appear shiny and making seeds stick to your loaves.  Just spray it on.  No brushing or cracking of eggs required.  The product is a bit pricey (just over ($11), but a can lasts a very long time, and it is extremely convenient to use.  Hope this helps.