The Fresh Loaf

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Dutch Crunch/tiger bread question

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txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Dutch Crunch/tiger bread question

Hi all, I have some wild rice onion dough (from "Artisan Breads Everyday") in the fridge right now, will make some rolls tomorrow. Want to add a layer of Dutch crunch/tiger bread topping on them, and I found several recipes:


- BBA has a simple formula, which can be applied before/after proofing;


- this one applies the topping in the middle of proofing: http://bakingbites.com/2006/09/cooking-school-dutch-crunch-bread/


- this one applies the topping after proofing, before baking: http://www.cookingbread.com/classes/class_crackle_bread.html


- and this one applies the topping before proofing: http://bakemyday.blogspot.com/2008/10/hellooo-tiger-bread.html


 


Just wondering whether anyone here has first hand experience with any recipes? Either one of the above, or something else. I usually proof rolls more fully than a free standing loaf, does it mean I should apply the topping during/before proofing? Since it will get limited oven spring?

inlovewbread's picture
inlovewbread

Hi, 


I just tried dutch crunch on some vienna hoagie type rolls I made. I applied the layer of dutch crunch mix during the final proofing, about 30 min. before the rolls went into the oven. The recipe was from BBA. This is how they turned out:


I don't know if I did it correctly or not- but I do wish I had applied a thicker layer. We couldn't taste it at all...


txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

So thicker it is. I was eyeing the BBA recipe and a bit unsure about the thickness etc. Your picture helps a lot.

Baking Soda's picture
Baking Soda

Hi! First of all thanks for the mention. Prior to clicking through to the different pictures I would have said that applying the topping before proofing would result in a more defined spotted crunch, now that I've seen the other pics it seems that wouldn't matter...


Anyway make sure the topping is quite thick and as inlovewbread already stated it needs to be layered thick. I think it's easier to do it before proofing because you wouldn't risk damaging your rise. Did you use yeast in your topping?

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

But I do plan to use yeast in it, which means I will have to time the rise of the topping and bread just right. So you would suggest proofing the yeasted topping seperately before putting it onto the bread?

Nathan's picture
Nathan

txfarmer. I've made this topping a few times using a Dan Lepard formula found in his book Baking with Passion. As far as ingrendients are concerned, the recipes in your links look similar. However, Dan's formula uses equal amounts of water and either semolina or rice flour. The consistency you want to shoot for is a smooth batter, not too thick and not too thin. It took me a few times to get this right. I tend to leave it slightly on the wet side right after mixing because the flour will soak up water while it's resting. Here's a pic of a tiger bread I made this summer. I like to put on a pretty thick topping right after shaping.


txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

I am going to look up that formula, any chance you can post some more details? Like how long I need to have the topping rise before putting it on? Thanks!

Nathan's picture
Nathan

Dan Lepard's Dutch Crunch Topping


300ml warm water (20ºC)


1 sachet fast-action yeast


300g semolina or rice flour


40ml sunflower oil


40g caster sugar


-Pour warm water into a bowl and whisk in the yeast, then add other ingredients and mix until you have a smooth batter. Cover and leave in a warm place (24-26ºC) to prove for 2-2.5 hours.


In his recipe, Dan says to lance the proofed bread with a skewer at three different points to release any trapped gas bubbles before ladling on the topping and spreading it out with your hands.


I'd advise you proof your bread on baking parchment. That'll make transfer and cleaning easier.


I'd do some experimenting on when to put the topping on. You'll get different results. I like putting the topping on right after shaping/before the final proof. Try both before and after the final proof to see which you prefer. You could divide your dough in two and try your experiment with the same batch of dough.


 


Good luck and have fun!

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

That's very helpful. Just one question: how much yeast is in "1 sachet"? I am making rolls, so I will have lots of experiment on.


 


Edit: I googled, seems that it's also 7g in one sachet in England? One more question, the topping needs to proof for 2 to 2.5 hours, that's including the time it proofs with the dough if I decide to add the topping right after shaping right? My rolls will need about 1.5 hours of proofing, so that means I should prepare the topping and let it right for about an hour, then shape the rolls, add the topping, and let both proof for another 1.5 hours?

Nathan's picture
Nathan

I'd make the topping right after mixing the dough if you're going to put it on the rolls during the final fermentation.The process you've detailed above looks like a winner.


I like to think of this topping like a poolish. Given it has yeast they will act in a similar way. Now, although I've never tried it before, there might be the possibility of making the topping beforehand and slowing the fermentation process down in the refrigerator if timing is an issue.


Let us know how they turn out.

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

The dough was mixed and put in the fridge last night (cold retarding method), so tonight I will just mix the topping, wait for one hour, then take out the dough to shape. I will try put it on before, during, after proofing just as an experiment. Will report back!


Thank you so much for your help!

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Not a success, but it's not the topping. In fact the topping came out great, the ones that's put on before proofing had more fragments, the ones that's put on in the middle of proofing had the best look, while the ones got the topping right before baking didn't have enough cracks.


However, that might have a lot to do with the fact that my rolls were massively overproofed. Got hocky bucks essentially. The recipe in the book specifies 1.5 to 2 hours of proofing time, I only did 70 minutes, but still over proofed. It could be because the rolls were so much smaller so they come to room temperature faster and proofed faster than bigger loaves. Anyway, I am trying again soon. Thanks for your topping recipe, it looked and tasted great!

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Nathan,


In your pictured loaf- which by the way, is beautiful-which type flour is used?

Nathan's picture
Nathan

To tell you the truth, I usually don't have rice flour. But what I do normally have around is a pasta flour made by De Cecco, the makers of the best dry pasta you can get here in Spain in my opinion. The package reads 'Semola di grano duro rimacinata-176'; it's a fine-ground hard wheat flour that's got a nice creamy yellow color. I also use it in formulas that call for durum flour, though I'm not exactly sure if it's the same thing.


mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Thanks. I also usually keep some semolina on hand. Although it's definitely a fine grained semolina, not a flour, it did work quite nicely in the only recipe with durum flour I tried.

candis's picture
candis

is ground rice the same as rice flour?

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi!


To clarify, rice flour is generally pretty fine.   Ground Rice is pretty coarse, used for milk puddings in the home, commercially, we call it Rice Cones.   This is what makes the discussion abourt when to apply the paste so interesting, as the grind has a bearing on liquid uptake over time!


Personally, I apply the paste about 20 minutes prior to baking.   That said, I use fresh yeast a-plenty to give a rapid ferment in conjunction with a little sugar and oil.   Consistency of paste sounds right,; some good advice here.   Personally, I think the paste has been applied a little too thickly in the photo, although the loaf itself looks very fine indeed.


You may find a hint of steam really helps too.   But to me you want something that is crisp and colourful.   We call it "Tiger Bread" in the UK; done right, it does indeed look fantastic.


Hope this is helpful


Best wishes


Andy

Kateyboo's picture
Kateyboo

I'm making this just now, I have replaced the sunflower oil with sesame oil. It smells like feet, though it will taste good when baked :-) this is my third attempt. My boyfriend has christened it tree bread.... I've been painting on the mix and it comes out looking like tree bark rather than tiger/giraffe markings. I'm just going to plaster this topping on and see how it goes :-) the tips, advice and pictures have been great.

 

k