The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sourdough No Knead bread

JoeV's picture
JoeV

Sourdough No Knead bread

Here are two no knead loaves baked in an oblong cloche. Both were made using the same reipe, using 1/4 Cup of sourdough starter in lieu of 1/4 t of instant yeast. The difference is in the fermentation time (12 hours for the first and 16 hours for the second), and the resultant "explosion" of the crust with the second loaf. Has anyone else seen this type of reaction when Iusing sourdough starter? I do not get this reaction when using commercial yeast and varying the fermentation time as earlier described. The flavor is magnificent, by the way.

 

Yesterday's loaf with 12 hour fermentation.

 

Here is today's loaf with 16 hour fermentation. It's too hot to cut into, but I'm sure the crumb is very open.

 

Check out the shine inside of the split. Is this the sugars carmelizing when the lid was removed? The crumb in yesterday's loaf had a sheen to it in the air holes.

Trishinomaha's picture
Trishinomaha

Joe:

Can you point me toward a recipe for this or share your recipe? I have one of those oblong bakers and would love to give this a try. It looks delicious!

JoeV's picture
JoeV

Trish, I just use the original no-knead recipe from Sullivan St. Bakery, but using sourdough starter in lieu of commercial yeast. Here is my recipe that works in the oblong or round cloche:

 

1# Unbleached flour (all-purpose or bread. I use Montana Sapphire AP with 10% protien)

1-1/2 tsp. Salt

1/4 C Sourdough starter

12-1/2 oz. Water (tepid, not warm)

Blend the salt and flour together. Mix the starter and the water together until blended, then add to the salt and flour, mixing well to incorporate all the dry ingredients. I use a Danish Dough whisk that I bought from Eric at www.breadtopia.com

Cover and let stand for 12-20 hours, then work as you would for any no-knead dough.

 

If you have never made no-knead bread before, you can check out my tutorials on my website at http://flyfishohio.us/NoKneadBread.htm and my tutorial for using parchment paper at http://flyfishohio.us/NoKneadParchPaper.htm

 

Trishinomaha's picture
Trishinomaha

You've inspired me to try the sourdough no-knead method again. I will getting my starter out of the fridge and waking it up to make some dough in a few days!

LeadDog's picture
LeadDog

Joe about the explosion.  The only time I got explosions like that is when I take the cover off to soon.  I was taking the cover off after 10 or 15 minutes and would get an explosion like that.  When I started leaving the lid on until the last 10 or 15 minutes the explosions stopped.  I bake a larger loaf than you and I go for an hour total time.

JoeV's picture
JoeV

I have been making no-knead breads for almost two years, and I never remove the cover until the 30 minute timer goes off. Also, I never slash no-knead bread, because I like the natural splitting that occurs...it's part of the character of the bread, IMO. My question has to do with using sourdough starter and whether or not anyone has seen dramatic changes in the tops splitting based on length of fermentation. I have not seen this drastic of a split until I extended the fermentation from 12 hours to 16 hours. I cannot imaging the propogation of the natural yeast could increase so dramatically over 4 additional hours as to cause this, but I just can't seem to put my finger on any other cause. It's the only variable that was altered from my normal formula. And yes, I shaped the loaf the same as always, so I have ruled out that step as part of the reason. Here are some loaves using commercial yeast, and you can see the splitting is not as pronounced...

 

LeadDog's picture
LeadDog

I think if you have eliminated all the other possibilities then it must be the sourdough.  I have been doing close to a no knead sourdough bread for about a year.  I don't shape my loaf or slash it.  I just scrape it out into a cast iron pot and cook it.  The bread turns out really great.

We do know that the tears in your bread are caused by expanding CO2 and that more CO2 is made the longer you wait.  Seems to be a logical answer to me.

althetrainer's picture
althetrainer

I just want to take a bite of it.  Lovely loaves!

Yumarama's picture
Yumarama

It's hard to tell but I'm not really able to see any signs of slashes in that explosion. If you're not, that will be a reason for the explosion, the bread wants to expand but has nowhere specific to do so. Therefore it simply bursts. If you have slashes - or more pronounced ones if you already did - the bread would expand where you "direct it" to. 

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

I was waiting for that to be mentioned. Curious too?

BettyR's picture
BettyR

I'm jealous, I use regular yeast and mine aren't as pretty as yours.

JoeV's picture
JoeV

Your bread looks just fine, and I'm sure it tastes as good as it looks. Venture to the dark side and make upa batch of sourdough starter. You'll be glad that you did.

 

http://www.breadtopia.com/make-your-own-sourdough-starter/

loafgeek's picture
loafgeek

Try scoring your no-knead sourdough.  That's what I do every time and it comes out perfect every time.  I get a nice non gummy rise out of it and looks pretty.  I also use a banneton for the rise phase because I like the spirals and it helps make for a taller loaf.

 

loafgeek's picture
loafgeek

Here is a pic I snapped of a no-knead sourdough boule I made:

JoeV's picture
JoeV

Very nice! The banneton makes for a nice look if you're photographing the bread or showcasing it for a meal as a table centerpiece. (Yes, I have been known to use bread as an edible centerpiece. Here are a couple of non-sourdough examples;

loafgeek's picture
loafgeek

Nice :)  Also, I get a better rise when I use the banneton since it makes the loaf pretty tall.

taurus430's picture
taurus430

I was baking the Lahey version of no knead for a few years. I did many variables including a beer and SD version. Then I went into the more complicated Tartine, FWSY &'Josey Baker. I was wondering the comparison as Laheys version is so simple, and works. Yet, I did the equivalent that Forkish has, Saturday Night loaf, with a little more detail used. My general question is, Lahey doesn't concern with temperatures, S&F's etc, while the other bakers use more techniques and Laheys method still works. Laheys recipe you just replace 1/4 tsp yeast with starter, others make a preferment using a starter.  Comments???