The Fresh Loaf

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San Joaquin Sourdough: another variation produces the best flavor yet.

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

San Joaquin Sourdough: another variation produces the best flavor yet.

 


My San Francisco Sourdough starter from sourdo.com is now two weeks old. I made another pair of my San Joaquin Sourdough breads with it yesterday. I modified my formula somewhat. I used a 60% hydration starter fed with AP flour only. I increased the amount of starter by 50%. I used KAF AP flour for the dough. I used no added instant yeast.



 


Ingredients

Weight

Baker's Percentage

Firm starter

150 gms

30.00%

KAF AP flour

450 gms

90.00%

BRM Dark Rye flour

50 gms

10.00%

Water

360 gms

72.00%

Salt

10 gms

2.00%

 

Procedure

  1. Mix the firm starter (1:3:5 – Starter:Water:Flour). Let it ferment at room temperature for 12 hours.

  2. Pour the water into a large mixing bowl. Add the starter and dissolve it in the water.

  3. Add the flours and mix to a shaggy mass. Cover tightly and let it sit for 20-60 minutes.

  4. Sprinkle the salt over the dough and mix thoroughly using the “stretch and fold in the bowl” technique. Let it rest for 30 minutes.

  5. Repeat the “stretch and fold in the bowl” for 30 strokes 2 more times at 30 minute intervals.

  6. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured board, and do one stretch and fold.

  7. Form the dough into a ball and place in a lightly oiled bowl. Note the volume of the dough. Cover the bowl tightly. Let it rest for 30 minutes.

  8. Repeat the stretch and fold on the board. Reform the dough into a ball and replace it in the bowl.

  9. Allow the dough to continue fermenting until the volume has increased 50%.

  10. Cold retard the dough for about 20 hours. (The dough had more than doubled and was full of large and small bubbles.)

  11. Take the dough out of the refrigerator and immediately transfer it to a lightly floured board.

  12. Divide the dough into two equal pieces and pre-shape them into logs or rounds, depending on whether you want to make boules or bâtards. Cover the pieces with plasti-crap and let them rest for 60 minutes. (Give them a shorter rest if the kitchen is very warm. You don't want them to expand very much, if any.)

  13. Pre-heat the oven to 500ºF with a baking stone and your steaming method of choice in place.

  14. Shape the pieces and place them in bannetons or on a couche. Cover the loaves and proof them until they have expanded by 50-70%. (30-45 minutes)

  15. Pre-steam the oven. Then transfer the loaves to a peel (or equivalent). Score them, and load them onto your baking stone.

  16. Turn the oven down to 460ºF.

  17. After 12 minutes, remove your steaming apparatus. Turn the loaves 180º, if necessary for even browning.

  18. Continue to bake the loaves for another 15-18 minutes or until their internal temperature is 205ºF.

  19. Turn off the oven, but leave the loaves on the stone with the oven door ajar for another 7-10 minutes to dry the crust.

  20. Transfer the loaves to a cooling rack.

  21. Cool the loaves completely before slicing.

 

The loaves were already singing when I took them out of the oven. The crust developed crackles, which can be credited to the use of AP rather than higher gluten flour and the drying in the oven (Step 19., above).

 

The crumb was nice and open.

 

The crust was crisp when first cooled and crunchy/chewy the next morning. The flavor was sweet and wheaty, like a good baguette, with the barest hint of sourness. This was po

ssibly the best tasting San Joaquin Sourdough I've made. I think I'm going to stick with this version. Next time, I may use this dough to make baguettes.


David


Submitted to YeastSpotting


 


 

Comments

azaelia's picture
azaelia

I have a batch of this dough cold retarding in the refrigerator right now, and I'm concerned that after 16 hours it hasn't budged from where it was when I put it in there :-/ My starter has no trouble doubling within 8 hours after I feed it at room temperature...I'm wondering if the cold retardation is stopping it in it's tracks (it's a brand new starter and it's never spent any time in the fridge until now). I was feeding my starter 1:2:4 every 12 hours at room temp and for this recipe, I took out 17g and fed it 51g water and 85g flour, which should have given me more than I needed, but somehow I only ended up with 145g when I weighed it out for the recipe. Maybe that's my problem? 


This is my first foray into sourdough baking, so I'm sure there's a high margin of error, but I followed the directions for mixing and folding exactly, and it seemed to be doing alright until it went into the fridge. Am I doomed to failure?

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Azaelia.


The refrigeration does slow down the yeast. I find that how much the dough expands depends on it's temperature and how active the fermentation was when the dough was put in the fridge.


In any case, if you follow the directions, you should end up with good bread. The dough not expanding in the fridge is not necessarily a problem.


David

azaelia's picture
azaelia

Thanks for the reassurance! I went ahead and followed the rest of the instructions as written, and aside from my terrible shaping and scoring skills, the bread came out the best I've ever baked! I couldn't believe it!




This was my first SD so I was surprised by the taste...it was so much sweeter than I imagined it would be, with a slight tang at the finish. I'm so proud of my baby starter! :-D


Thanks for your help and for this amazing recipe! I will definitely be making this again!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Your loaves look good, and your crumb looks even better! Pretty impressive results for a first sourdough.


The sweetness comes with the long, slow fermentation. I'm so glad you like it!


David

willsfca's picture
willsfca

depending on how active your 17g of starter was, it could take a while for the yeast to multiply enough to work on the 85g of flour.


after few batches of this dough i realized that i always had a tendency to underproof the dough, which gave me pretty tasty but very dense bread in the end. i finally learned to let the dough rise enough in room temp before cold restarding it, or give it more time in the fridge if it doesn't feel light and bubbly enough to me. i've had dough that sat in the fridge for 2 days, maybe 3 days and still came out great. come to think of it i've never overproofed a batch yet.


the only time i see that happens is when i make a stiff starter for a pain au levain bread, where i would use a pretty high ratio of starter to flour, and after 6-8 hours the stiff starter overproofs and turns into soft, squishy dough. but it just basically becomes a bigger mass of starter and when i add it to the main dough it works great.


in any case, my point is that it would take a lot of starter to overproof dough, so if it doesn't feel bubbly i would just let it go longer, either in the fridge or at room temp before you bake it. good luck!


 

Father Raphael's picture
Father Raphael

Dear David


I am new to "forums" but old to this world.  You look like a young fella so I must tell you after reading the number of hours involved in the San Joachin bread, I got tired.  Gradually overcoming my laziness, the enjoyment that comes from baking, is coming back.  I bake almost everyday but would compare my results to a used Studebaker and yours a Rolls Royce.


Thank you for your labor and generosity.


+Father Raphael

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Welcome to TFL! And thank you for your kind words.


This bread involves many hours from start to finish, but little work time for the baker. That is one of its appeals to me.


David

dunlapjc3's picture
dunlapjc3

David,


 


I made this bread recently, and was amazed at the texture and size of the crumb.  This is the first recipe that I have tried that I would deem "advanced."


That being said, I wasn't sure if my dough was hydrated how it should have been.  It seemed very wet, almost like a ciabatta dough.  I had to use a liberal amount of flour when I was shaping my loaves and found that I had to be REALLY delicate lest the dough decided to glue on to my hands as I pulled them away.  Sticky.  After proofing them, they wanted to spread out like a pancake.  


I must admit, I was surprised at the amount of oven spring these loaves had, but it did not completely take care of the bread's flat appearance.  My boule and baguette did not look like some of the "fluffier" pictures I've seen posted using your recipe.


Any thoughts?

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The dough is sticky. Lightly flouring your hands while shaping helps. Do your shaping in a way that your hands are in the briefest possible contact with the dough for each step.


This bread needs support while proofing. For long loves, I use a couch - either linen or parchment paper. (For the later, you don't take the loaves off the paper for baking. For boules, use a banneton. These keep the shaped loaves from spreading too much.


David

rossnroller's picture
rossnroller

G'day David.


Just interested to know how you support your shaped dough during final proof on parchment paper?


I use parchment paper, also, with two blocks of wood paralleling the long edges of the dough as support. I have plastic covering the dough loosely enough to allow expansion during the proof and tucked under the blocks of wood so there is no contact between wood and dough, and a teatowel draped over the whole shebang.


If retarding overnight then baking straight out of the fridge next day, I leave the shaped dough, plastic and wood blocks inside a large oblong plastic container with lid on, and bung the container in the bottom of the fridge.


Both methods work OK, but are a bit makeshift and unwieldy. I don't have couches or bannetons, or any bread moulds - hence the improvisation!


So, I'm all ears!


Cheers
Ross

willsfca's picture
willsfca

hi ross, I use parchment paper for all my high hydration doughs (>60%) since I don't have a couche nor bread peel. all I do is cut out pieces of the paper about twice to three times the width of the shaped loaves, dust them with flour, and plop each loaf in the middle of the paper. then you can push the sides of the paper up against the sides of the loaf. you can oil the sides of the paper so they don't stick to the dough, or just bake it and it'll come off after few minutes in the oven.

in any case, once the dough is on the parchment paper you can push one loaf up against each other which will support them while they rise. you can use rolled up towels or cans to stop the loaves at the ends from sliding.

I slide the loaves into the oven on the parchment paper, but I usually take out the paper when I rotate the loaves (about 10 min in). at this point the loaves should come right off of the paper. I also reuse the paper few more times until it falls apart.

btw, with a dough this wet I usually uncover the dough about 20 minutes before baking so the dough's not too wet before I score it. the dough will not dry out that much in that time at all.

have fun with your next batch!

will

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

For two loaves, I cut the parchment to fit my peel. I fold it in the middle and place it on the peel with the middle crease pointing up and forming a "wall" at least as high as I expect the loaves to rise. This separates the loaves and provides lateral support for their facing sides. I place the loaves to either side of the crease. I dust the loaves with flour to keep them from sticking to the paper. Then, the outside edges of the paper and lifted, and a rolled up dish towel is placed up against these margins to support the outside of the loaves. Then the whole business is covered with plasti-crap or another towel.


When the loaves are proofed, I remove the towels and pull the edges of the paper outward. This collapses the center crease and pulls the loaves apart, leaving 3-4 inches between them. I bake with loaves on the parchment paper.


I hope this is clear.


David

rossnroller's picture
rossnroller

I don't usually do more than one loaf, but when I next do two I'll try your parchment 'wall' - sounds sensible.


Don't suppose it makes much difference using rolled up dish towels or wooden blocks, but lifting up the outside edges of the parchment paper is simpler than what I'm doing with my plastic covering, so will go with you on that next bake.


Thanks to you, also, willsfca. Like you, I pull the parchment paper out when I rotate the bread at the end of the steam period (15 minutes into the bake in my case), and I also reuse the paper until the outside gets too burnt and brittle. Great minds, you know...or shared anti-waste philosophies, at least!


Like your idea of exposing wet doughs for the last part of the proof to firm up the surface area for slashing. I'll certainly give that a go. As I recall, Gerard Rubaud leaves his dough exposed throughout the final proof to develop a surface skin, so you're in good company with that thinking.


Cheers!
Ross

Trialer70's picture
Trialer70

I first made this recipe about a week ago and it was a magnificent loaf, looking just like the other pictures--crusty, good rise and oven spring, great bubbles inside, lovely even browning of the crust, the works.  Many compliments garnered at the dinner I took it to.


Today, disaster!  Two ciabatta-flat loaves with crust that browned unevenly, almost burning over the air pockets underneath while the rest of the crust stayed paler than I like it to be.  I'll toast it and eat it with soup or spaghetti or slice and make sandwiches out of it, but I'd like to know what happened.


Three things I did differently than last week:  moved my oven rack and baking stone to the middle position of oven, made a double batch for two loaves instead of the one like last week and the fermentation phase was 17 hours in the refrigerator instead of closer to 21 like last week.  Otherwise the dough handled the same.  I proofed the loaves for 40 minutes, which was like last week, and slashed them longways down the middle, like last week.


So...what went wrong?  I was so tickled that I'd found a sourdough recipe that worked last week and produced a lovely loaf.  I'm greedy for more of last week's successes. 

sanchiro's picture
sanchiro

I have baked several loaves of sourdough and despite the great taste, My loaves never rise more than 1.5 to 2 inches. I don't have the right tools, perhaps; no canvas lined proofing bowls. When I attempt to form/shape logs, they look ok but then flatten in moving from proofing board onto baking sheet (I need to get a new stone, I know).

Is there any secret to helping loaves of whatever shape to rise more?

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Especially with loaves made with high-hydration dough, lateral support of the loaves during proofing is essential to keep them from spreading out. You can use a banneton or a couche. If you don't have baker's linen (the best option), you can make a couche using parchment paper, then bake the loaves on the paper. If you need more instruction on this, ask or use the TFL search function.

David

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Just joined the site and have found it about the best place to find out anything about bread and your blog, among others,  is especially fine.  I wanted to try your formula to the tee but ran into several obsticales.  First off, my sour starter of choice is a 1:4:4 half white and half wheat flour one so I had to make it a 1:4:5  after feeding it.  Also I have no Rye so subed WW.  Also used bread flour instead of AP.  Next thing I know it is too late to get everything done and the dough in the frig for its 20 hour retardation.  After 10 hours  getting the starter right, l instead of 12,  I had to retard the starter overnight in the frig instead.

I have never done the stretch and fold before but all seemed well the next morning after completing the several bowl and board development exercises required.  17 hours in the frig later, the dough had not doubled - it had just flattened out miserably.  Worried, I took it out of the frig right then and there and went into salvage mode by warming it up.  After an hour completing another stretch and fold, I shaped the flat dough and put the two shaped loaves in your unique parchment containment.  I did this right on the peel, as you recommend, for the final rise so I wouldn't have to mess with it much to slide the risen loaves onto the baking stone later.  I wrapped the whole peel in a plastic kitchen trash bag, as others suggested, to rise and got the oven ready to bake.

I heated the old GE up up using a Pyrex loaf pan half full of water along with a large cast iron fry pan that I filled with some granite rocks instead of pieces of iron that you wisely recommend.  Next thing I know the house smells like bad rocks with really smelly feet that walked for several days in pig effluent and chicken manure.  I get the rocks out of the pan and open all the windows to get the smell put of the kitchen.  I re-fire Betsy and she is heading off to 500 degrees when all of the sudden the beast catches fire.  I actually never saw the fire but the smoke was unbelievable.  The smoke detectors went off, the windows went wide open again again and I ripped the aluminum foil off the bottom of the oven where most of the smoke seemed to emanate.   Poor Betsy hadn't been over 350 degrees for a long time and most likely had not been cleaned even longer.   Still, she somehow managed to make her own charcoal and put it right on the aluminum foil for easy extraction once the fire was restrained somewhat.  Thank goodness my wife left the house after the first sign of awful rock smells, for her daily run and missed the smoke and possible fire completely.

Finally back on  track and the oven an hour into preheat , I open the plastic bag to pull out the peel and there were two loaves that had pushed the towels restraining them and the parchment aside so they could get as spread out and flat as the second law of thermodynamics would allow.   I read that spreading has happened to others and it wasn't so bad in the end but, as things were not quite going as planned,  I left one as is and reshaped the other into a slightly taller mass of loaf that was half as long as the other.  After a quick slash, into the oven they went with no further problem since they were already on the peel.  I chucked a cup of water in the skillet, shut the door and hoped for the best.

Well, that is exactly what I got.  Nearly explosive spring, great crunchy and chewy crust, tremendous crumb with large medium and small holes equally distributed and the taste was great.  It was better the next day.  I took pictures but don't know how to get them uploaded.  It was so worth all the trials and tribulations.  The odd thing was that both loaves looked the same inside and out with one being shorter and fatter.

Thanks so much for your great recipe David.   I learned so much from you and site in just 1 day.  New stretch and fold technique, autolayse? new slasher, new way to steam, new 1:4:5 sour, new long retard, and a new perfectly clean oven after I cleaned up the mess Betsy was in afterwards.  I ate 1 whole loaf  yesterday and the other today.  I now have my sandwich and toast multi grain sourdough challah (Brachflachen Mehrere Vollkombrot), that I have been making incorrectly for 25 years, in the fridge after using these exact same techniques instead of the old 10 minute hand knead, shape after 2nd rise, put in a cold oven with pan of boiling water and bake at 350  for about 30 minutes.  But, the old way never had any stink or smoky fires that I can remember.  Alas, it lacked the excitement of something great and wonderful.

I have 1 question.  Do you use Kosher salt?  I use medium sea salt so I cut the salt to 5 grams thinking you did and I would rather have less salt than too much.

 

 

 

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

...and I can relate to many of the pits you fell in to.  I, too, am a fan of San Joaquin Sourdough and have previous made that recipe and will undoubtedly make it again.

FF

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

that she has recovered from her ordeal.  500 degree bake and 4 hour self clean did wonders.  Ain't she purty?

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The best evidence I've yet encountered I must have put together a bullet-proof formula! LOL

I'm certainly relieved you were able to enjoy the bread after all your trials! I hope you saved a slice of one loaf for your wife.

I generally use sea salt. If you weigh the salt, all salts are the same. Of course, if you measure by volume, a tsp of kosher salt is a lot less NaCl than salts with smaller crystals. Almost all breads are made with close to salt at 2% of the total flour weight.

Thanks for sharing your saga. Welcome to TFL! And Happy Baking!

David

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I can, with the best intention, pretty much find every hole one can fall into, large or small - without  hardly working at it - long or hard.  My wife got one slice only since she loves Oroweat 100% WW and is not partial to wild things like sourdough yeasts and husbands in the kitchen.  Thanks for the salt info.  After a couple of days ago I weigh everything out now.  The reason I asked is that I thought my loaves needed more.  My starter sure likes being fed correctly by weight too instead of starved like it was for years and years.  Thanks for the welcome and keep those bullet proof recipes coming!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I think the loaves came out pretty good for the first try at so many new things and techniques.. Love to eat SD with olive oil, pecorino, pepper, fresh basil and garlic.  Thanks David

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

Davidkatz's picture
Davidkatz

I've been "Norwitching" for the past month or so...

I am in a happy place with my current results.

Do you think I could use my local starter for this recipe.

I am loving the open crumb you got.

I'm almost there - but not totally. Any suggestions on how to get a fuller, consistant, open crumb?

ChristLane2930's picture
ChristLane2930

Hello David.

I always read your blog (as in everyday!) and honestly I drool whenever I see your bread! They all wonderful and really looking yummy! So to stop my drooling I started to bake my own bread instead of going to the boulangerie near our house. They were making lovely baguettes and really delicious!

I have a problem regarding with the flours we have here. I am kinda confused what kind of flour should I substitute with all the flour you were using to your bread. Like for example the baguette. I always use T65 for these and I found out that the crumb was a bit gummy and heavy. What can I susbtitute for AP flour also for the bread flour? Could you kindly help me which French flour, corresponds KA Flours? Please, I am going crazy with my recipes! lol! I am sorry for my english. I had to use Translation. Thank you so much! I am so much excited to try all your breads here!

I have here the types of flour we have:

T45-

T55-

T65-

T70

T80

T90

T110

T130

T150

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I'd exhange flours with you, if it were easy! 

American AP (all purpose) flour is very roughly equivalent to your T55. There is no equivalent to "bread flour," since this is just like AP except milled from a higher protein wheat mixed with lower protein wheat, generally. You may be able to find a "strong" flour that is a mix of French and Canadian wheat that is similar. T150 is equivalent to our whole wheat flour. 

If I were in France, I believe I would use T65 flour for better flavor than T55. I don't think your "gummy," "heavy" crumb can be blamed on the flour. 

I suggest that you pose your question regarding your baguette problems in a new topic. It helps if you give us the recipe you are using and your procedures for mixing, fermentation, etc. Photos of your baguettes, including the crumb, help us make good suggestions.

Happy baking!

David

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

Second time I've tried the recipe.  A good bread.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Nice-looking loaves.

David

TastefulLee's picture
TastefulLee

Hi, David. I am excited to read about this bread and anxious to start it this Sunday. My question is regarding steps 4 & 5. In step 4, am I to stretch and fold the dough 30 strokes as in step 5, and if so, what is meant by this? My only experience with stretch and fold is the letter style (spread out the dough on bench, pat into rectangle and fold the four sides in, turn over and place back in bowl) at 30 minute intervals. Do I do this 30 times, which seems overkill, or is there another way you are describing here?

Sorry if this is a silly question, and thanks in advance for your assistance. Lisa

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Lisa.

The technique called for has been called "Stretch and Fold in the Bowl." My research suggests it was first published by Joe Ortiz. It is described also in  some printings of Hamelman's Bread, although not in the one I have. Mark Sinclair (mcs on TFL) made a nice video of the technique which can be viewed here: NoKnead.html

The 30 strokes is really a maximum. The end point is when the dough is strong enough so additional folds result in it tearing, which you don't want. 

Hope this helps.

David

dirider's picture
dirider

Yes, it took 3 tries for success. It's all about timing.

2012-12-13 Thursday- I mixed the levain before going to work in a plastic container with lid. I carried it to Sweethaven that night.

Friday morning, I mixed the levain with water and flours, 60 min autolyse, then followed the SnF process as written. The oiled covered bowl stayed on the countertop until 16:30, then went out to the 41deg (and falling) shop overnight. I brought it back in on Saturday at 12:30 and let it reside on the countertop until about 1430, then I performed step 12. At 1530, I shaped a boule and a batard and covered as in step 14. I preheated my natural gas oven to 500 deg convection at 1720. Loaves on parchment, deep cuts and into the oven onto the stone at 1730 for 23 minutes, 3 ice cubes at 460deg. Persistence has paid off. Success! Holy Grains of Flour, this is good. The 7 minutes with oven off at the end sure did make for a crackling crunchy crust. Verra’ nice. Patience pays off. Served it with Lobster/Clam Chowder.

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I'm glad you enjoyed it!

David

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I do admire your dedication in developing the Ever-Better-Über-Mega-San Joaquin Sourdough.

I am (and remain) your faithful follower, munching happily on San Joaquin Sourdoughs,

Happy Holidays,

Karin

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

It gives me great pleasure to hear that you still enjoy the SJSD.

Happy Holidays to you and yours!

David

litlmama97's picture
litlmama97

Hello David, I'm new to this post.  My husband was told he should stay away from gluten and yeast, among other things.  So I am trying to find a way to make a GF bread with a starter.  I went to the sourdo.com site as you mentioned that was where you purchased your SF starter from.  They list a "wild yeast" in the ingredients, and I still haven't verified if the starters are made with regular wheat flour or not.  but I didn't know what wild yeast is - and their note didn't really help explain it at all.  I have done a bit of GF baking, as we had friends live with us for a few weeks and I was cooking and baking for them as well.  so I'm not as scared about that - but really want to find SOMETHING that I can bake for my hubby, since he absolutely LOVES bread!!  Thanks so much! :)  Hope I commented here like I'm supposed to - didn't see where else to send you a comment.

THANKS!  Jennifer

dirider's picture
dirider

Hi Jennifer,

 

Use the Search bar to find "gluten free" methods.

Wild yeast is grown from wheat flours.

In my research, I have found that folks who live with gluten sensitivity (aka Celiac's Disease) may be challenged because of the 'modern' methods of bread making; fast mix and rise with active yeast.

The 'old fashioned way' , wild yeast, autolyse and longer proofs (24-48 hours), which gives the proteins in the flour time to absorb the moisture and pre digest, may be the reason why these breads will not cause digestive issues.

You are a good wife who looks to serve her husband's best nutritional needs, Diane

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Jennifer.

First, for the record, I haven't used the sourdo.com starter for years, but that's not the point. Diane answered your question regarding the definition of "wild yeast." Basically, it is yeast that has been "captured" by making a sourdough starter. The species of yeast that grow on grain are different from those industrially cultured and sold packaged in stores.

I'm sorry to say, I can't help you much regarding gluten-free bread baking. I have read that bread made with grains other than wheat such as rye, kamut and spelt may be tolerated by some who have gluten sensitivity. King Arthur Flour has been selling mixes for making gluten-free baked goods, including bread. I have always found the people who answer their phones enormously helpful with technical questions. I would encourage you to give them a call. I bet they can help.

David

litlmama97's picture
litlmama97

thank you so much Diane and David, too!

I have found some posts where folks have used brown rice flour to get a starter made, but it takes 4-5 days.  I will just experiment!  I appreciate this base recipe for your sourdough bread that will give me a platform to start from!! :)  Hope you have had a Merry CHRISTmas!  Thank you again so much for your help in understanding what wild yeast is, etc! :)  (and to call the companies that make the GF mixes - what a great idea - I'd never thought of that! :)  THANKS!!!)

Blessings,

Jennifer

M2's picture
M2

I'm one of your many fans as well, David.  As a matter of fact, I just made the SJSD last week and it was fantastic.  Every time I make it, I keep the whole dough as one big loaf.  I struggled with the shaping a bit but it still turned out great!

Michelle

dirider's picture
dirider

This olde world style of making bread is therapy for me. Work in the kitchen usually is. I am happy in my home. David, I do so adore you for creating this place where we can gather together and share our journey. I chose the semolina road for this batch.

AT this location, I am working in a limited kitchen and I improvise tools.  Note rolling pin and box of pasta used to support loaves during final proof. My husband, in his wisdom, does agree that a good range is imperative.

2012-12-26 I grew yeast through the morning hours (as I finished the loaves above), both LG and Sweethaven yeast. (I have cultures growing in two locations and sometimes I take them with me.) At 1530, I mixed the 1:3:4 with Sweethaven yeast, to start another batch. This is a 3 day process, so starting ahead is necessary.

2012-12-27 Nice Sweethaven yeast growth at 1000 hrs. Mixed 360g Crystal Geyser water, 50g semolina, 200g AP, 250g bread flour, one hour autolyse, add salt, then continue as written. At 1530, the dough was developing nicely, had many bubbles forming  and so went out to the cold (46deg and falling) shop.

2012-12-28 Brought it back in at 0800. Nice and puffy. Divided into 2 for baguettes. One hour rest, covered, then a bit more gentle shaping and onto parchment covered peal for final proof at 0920. At 1030, I saw some nice rise and preheated the oven to 500deg convection. At 1045 I put 3 ice cubes in the oven and made several diagonal slashes in the two loaves, then placed them on the stone and reduced heat to 445deg convection for 23 min. WhooHooHoo! The oven spring is delightful. Oh my…. Off the parchment and onto the stone for 2 more minutes, then 7 min heat off with door cracked open. Oh so pretty and oh so good! Crumb and crust not quite the same as when sing dark rye, yet still crisp with soft sponge chewiness. I took one loaf to the club with a crockpot full of smoked meats and beans. They enjoyed it.

      This morning, I mixed a dark rye batch with 1:3:5 Sweethaven yeast, HnH AP/bread flour. Probably will be ready for bake tomorrow afternoon. I let the dough tell me when it's ready...

dirider's picture
dirider

2012-1-12 Friday, Los Gatos; I started my levain on Thursday night using Sweethaven yeast. I don’t know why, I mixed my levain using 50gstarter/60gAP/40gwater. I mixed the dough Friday morning (I was telecommuting) and followed the instructions as written (autolyse 1 hr. add salt, SNFs), letting the dough go out to the cold garage overnight. Brought it in Saturday morning at about 9:00. Whoa Ho, very bubbly! Near the top of the Tupperware covered bowl I use for proofing. Split in two, then divided one of the halves into 4. I shaped two sandwich rolls and flattened two for stuffing with homemade ground breakfast sausage, shallot, leek and smoked Anaheim with a little grated Mexican cheese. I gently shaped the other half into a batard.

I slashed the batard lengthwise (shears), then into a preheated 500deg electric oven, reduced to 460deg with 12 min steam (ice cubes), upper oven, then vent and turn for another 17 min, remove pockets and rolls. 11 min more for the batard (should have been 4). Awesome oven spring! The best yet. I think the levain formula is the one to use.   

The filled pockets were delicious, crunchy and savoury. Though I overcooked the batard (on the phone with my daughter), it was delightful. The overcooked crust was uber crunchy, my husband said “It’s not overdone to me!” The sponge was chewy and flavourful.

meirp's picture
meirp

Although I used my home-grown starter (whole wheat) that I've been nurturing for many years and dark (country-style) flour instead of AP. Taste and consistency are fantastic. Amazing crust too! It's very impressive that your breads have been inspiring others for so long. Thanks!

Meir

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Your loaf looks wonderful! The crumb is remarkably open for a bread made with a WW levain and (presumably) high-extraction flour!

I'm glad you enjoy it.

David

meirp's picture
meirp

I'm based in Israel, where the flour names and labelling are different than in N. America. The dark flour I use is basically a high-protein (unbleached) flour with higher ash/bran content (higher protein than the regular bread flour they sell here). It makes an off-white-colored crumb. It is definitely not whole wheat, so the open crumb is actually par for the course (assuming I don't screw up, that is). I use this flour as my go-to bread flour. Thanks again.

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