The Fresh Loaf

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Multi grain tortillas

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janij's picture
janij

Multi grain tortillas

I am wanting to figure out how to make a multi grain whole wheat tortilla.  I have a recipe I really like and use all the time that I can sub some whole wheat in.  I am wondering if anyone has any ideas about adding grains to the tortillas.  I was wondering about soaking craked grains.  But would they need to be ground finer after they are soaked?  And how much should I add to a 2 c of flour recipe?  Maybe a couple tablespoons.  I am going to just start experimenting, but I have surfed the web and not found any ideas.  So I didn't know if anyone had any ideas.

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

adding cracked grains is probably not a practical choice.  Cracked grains added to some other flatbreads that are a bit thicker, though, might work.


Whole grain flours in tortillas are definitely a possibility, although you'll want to experiment with hydration levels and how finely ground the flour is.  I'd lean in the direction of playing with whole wheat to begin with.  Once you have an idea how that behaves, you might be primed to start adding flours with lower or no gluten content (rye, barley, oat, etc.).


Keep us posted on your results, please!


Thanks,


Paul

Nim's picture
Nim

Indian rotis and chapathis are like whole wheat tortillas. The dough is easy to make whole wheat flour, salt and water. Knead to a nice silky dough, refrigerate for 30 minutes, roll out thin rotis and cook on a griddle. The rolling out and making them so it balloons on a griddle is slightly more tricky and takes some practice.

janij's picture
janij

Where do you find recipes or formulas for these rotis and chapathis?

salma's picture
salma

You dont need a formula.  They are very simple to make.  Most often they are made with chapati flour from Indian stores.  If you cannot find that, use half w/w and half A/P.  I would practice with a cup of flour, 1/4 t salt, 1 T oil and enough water to form a soft dough.  You may knead it by hand for 3 minutes or in the bread machine.  Let it sit covered for at least 1/2 hr or even 3 hours.  Divide into about 6 balls or so.  Roll them out into circles about 6" or so and cook on a griddle for about 1/2 minute. Then turn over and cook, moving it around on the griddle since the griddle may have hot spots and esp if you see a spot burning.  Keep turning over every few secs till it is nicely tanned on both sides and you dont see any uncooked areas.  Dab a little butter on one side.  These are used to scoop up curries.  As kids we used to eat them hot off the griddle, spread with ghee/butter and a sprinkle of sugar.


Salma

janij's picture
janij

I made an attempt and was pleased with the results.  I took about 2 T of oatmeal, and 2 T of nine grain cereal.  I added 1/4 c water and nuked in the microwave for about 2 1/2 minutes.  Then I covered it with plastic and let it sit for a few hours.  This softened the grains enough to put in the dough and still roll out well.  I was wondering if I would need to put them in the food processor after but did not need to.  When I was ready I took 1 c of white flour and 1 c of wheat flour, mixed in 1/2 t of baking powder, crumbled in the grains and added 3/4 c of warm water.  Mixed and kneaded and let rest 20 min.  Then I rolled out and baked on a griddle.  I think they needed more water but they rolled out well and cooked up fine.  It made 12 large taco size tortillas.  I liked them and will keep playing with them to see if I can get them even better.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I am curious how things developed in the whole wheat tortilla projuect for you. I have an inquiry in another Forum here about developing a low carb,hi fiber tortilla. Your results and experience could be helpful.

What worked and what didn't? Did you ever determine a "formula" or recipe you like?

Regards