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stones/tiles 4 baking--where to buy, pdx area

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goody1006's picture
goody1006

stones/tiles 4 baking--where to buy, pdx area

I'm in a tough spot: my limited income is screaming at the prices of "baking/pizza" stones, and I can't seem to find quarry tiles anymore!

Anyone have a inexpensive alternative? I really can't go over $20-$30, once s&h is added, for online.

I know there's alot of members in the Portland (OR) metro area--any recomendations around town?

THANKS~

** 4 NOV 2009: update!

I ended up buying a pizza stone from : webstaurantstore.com

It was affordable (even with shipping) and it's working ok. I can only use it in my bottom oven (standard sized)...but until this week, was still searching for tiles I could use in my upper oven (much smaller in size).

I finally found a place in Vancouver WA (TILE OUTLET, on Minnihaha/63rd)(by my daughter's) which could get the 6x6 unglazed quarry tiles.

I bought 8, with shipping (Had to leave for home that day) it's under 15.00. they should arrive at my door by Friday.

I had 'googled' daltile (which is the company I found in my searches which produce them) carried at several places in the Portland area...didn't inquire at any for pricing, as I found what I wanted at the vanc. place.

thanks to EVERYONE who's chimed in with sage advice on this matter! I'ts GREATLY appreciated by this baker~

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I found unglazed quarry tiles at the Home Depot in Mall 205 a couple of years back for 99 cents each.  The staff there wasn't much help, so I had to just poke around the flooring section for 15 minutes or so until I found what I needed.


Good luck!


Floyd

auntiep's picture
auntiep

Where in the world do you live to fine unglazed tiles?


I live just north of Atlanta Ga. I have call so many tile supplies and HD, Lowes etc... can not find them anywhere for any price! I was told by one tile company that unglazed tile are no longer made. WHAT?


I found some "baking tiles' on Amazon but they are $40.00. I want to us them in my RV camp oven. It's small no mone than 12"x12".


If ANYBODY has a web site... please fowrad so I can get some.

OldWoodenSpoon's picture
OldWoodenSpoon

I just came back from picking some up!  I don't live in your area, but I know you can find some there the way I did here.  I Google'd manufacturers on the web and then looked up their local distributors.  The manufacturers I identified were Summitville Tiles (the one I bought), and Seneca Tiles.   From there I started calling the distributors and asking for referrrals when they did not have what I wanted.  In three phone calls I had located a local tile and stone distributor that had exactly what I wanted, in stock. 


The in stock part is the trick.  If they don't have it on the floor in the warehouse, the freight is prohibitive.  I just bought 12 6"x6" brick-red unglazed quarry tiles, enough for two shelves in my single oven, for $2.90 per square foot.  They cost about $1.02 per tile with tax and all in.  I just put  them in the oven to heat them up and cook the manufacturing smell out of them.  I can't wait to bake some more bread now.

janeburton's picture
janeburton

What is the thickness of your 6X6 tiles?  I have some tiles that have been lying around that fit your description but they are rather thin .  I've been wondering if they would work.  Seems like they'd heat up faster.

OldWoodenSpoon's picture
OldWoodenSpoon

question when you asked it.  I lost track of the thread I guess.  After putting my tiles in the oven I extended my preheat time to at least 45 minutes for temperatures up to 450F.  I go a full hour if I am heating to a temperature higher than that.


OldWoodenSpoon


 

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

you might try Bed Bath and Beyond for their pizza stones.  They have these 20% off coupons everywhere (we get them regularly in the paper and in the mail) and with that discount you might be able to come within your affordable price range. 


Their website, BTW, is showing a 15"X14" Oneida pizza stone for $20. 


I know it's more expensive than unglazed tiles, but I've had my pizza stone for more than 20 years, multiple cross country moves, and hundreds of loaves with no breakage, so amortized over all those years it was a good buy! 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I'd love to bake on this relief tile...


Unfortunately it is priceless.  Ancient Korean.


salma's picture
salma

I bought 9 unglazed tiles at Home Depot for 39c apiece a year ago.  Only 6 fit in my oven, so I have 3 spare which I should really put on the lower shelf to absorb extra heat.  Before that I had cracked 2 pizza stones, one within a week.  I think its less chance of cracking because they are only 6x6.


Salma

Elagins's picture
Elagins

I have them at better prices than almost anyone else. check out my website.


Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com

jannrn's picture
jannrn

Hello Stan!


I have looked at your website many times and found ALOT of things I really would like to have, but the shipping seems to be the biggest problem for me. I know that flour and stones are heavy and I am in Florida so that doesn't help either!! I see you do have baking stones, but it seems to me that $20 is much better to pay at Bed Bath and Beyond with NO shipping than $35 PLUS shipping!! I have found many other ingredients on your site as well that I am interested in and am watching for the things you have coming!! Hopefully you will have a shipping promo for the holidays!!! At any rate...thank you for making me aware of your site! I will KEEP watching!!

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

That 3/8" Oneida stone is a toy compared to a real baking stone. A serious baking stone needs to be at least a half inch thick, and preferably thicker.


Not to be offensive, but, pennywise, pound...


Stan's 16x14 stone is only $29.95.


(Maybe Stan can have a grand opening, free shipping special for us fresh "loafers", hehe.  OK, 10% coupon?)

Elagins's picture
Elagins

at the prices i'm charging, i can't afford to give shipping away. sorry! maybe with a minimum order .... 


Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com

janeburton's picture
janeburton

I was considering using these tiles I have which are quite thin.  I think they're called quarry tiles.  Why is thickness important?  I'm not being argumentative - I really don't have a clue.

Elagins's picture
Elagins

simply put, the thicker the stone, the more heat it will hold.

there are two really big problems with home ovens:

first, they heat unevenly, so there are hot spots and cold spots. to test that, just get a good thermometer and move it around, front to back, top to bottom and take a look at the different temp readings. a stone evens out the heat because it holds the heat more evenly and redistributes it inside the oven.

the second reason is that home ovens really aren't designed for bread baking. every time you open the door, you're going to lose 20, 30, 40 degrees of heat. by absorbing and then radiating the heat, the stone reduces the impact of door openings.

so think of a baking stone the same way you think of one of those cold packs you put in the freezer and then into your ice chest. It's a source of steady, even heat that reduces a lot of the shortcomings of home ovens.

hope this helps

Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

And probably in a related way(it's ability to act as a heat sink), the thicker the stone, the less likely it is to crack.


This is my belief about stones. Not speaking about quarry tiles, as I have no knowledge or experience whatsoever with tiles.


 

Elagins's picture
Elagins

a stone's ability to withstand thermal shock, e.g., dousing a hot stone with cold water, has a lot to do with the material. most tiles are fired at relatively low heat and are simply not made to withstand repeated heating and cooling. they're designed to be thinset into place and walked on or used as a wall covering that's typically subject to either moisture, grease, or both. (there's another, bigger issue about the toxicity of tile materials, since they never were designed to come in contact with food, but that's another discussion).

the stones i have are made of cordierite, which is the same material used in commercial deck (pizza) ovens, and which is approved for food use by the FDA. it also has the advantage of being stable at temperatures beyond 2500F, which is about 5 times what the average home oven can crank to and about twice to three times the working temp of a wood-burner or coal oven. more importantly, cordierite has exceptional resistance to thermal stress, meaning that unless you really abuse it, that stone simply will not crack.

i'd be careful with quarry tiles for all those reasons, and i'd avoid the thin pizza stones simply because they don't hold enough heat; lord knows i went through enough of them before i got wise.

Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com

bakerking's picture
bakerking

I am a contractor in northern minnesota, I just put soapstone countertops in for a client and ask for a piece of soapstone 19" x 23" for baking. Works great, problem is it is an inch thick and soapstone weighs 30# per sq. ft., my wife can't even lift it and we worry about the oven racks. But I can do 4 loaves on it

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

This 3/8" stone served it's purpose well for over 4 years(still does actually), occasionally baking pizzas. Shortly after I began baking all my breads and pizza doughs(about 6 months ago), I went to load it and discovered it had cracked.


Since I didn't discover it when it actually cracked, I can't exactly say what caused it. I can only guess it was thermally shocked, probably by a mass of cooler bread dough, or from spraying(misting) for steam. I never misted until I started baking bread.


Even though cracked, it still performs as it always has. Still makes great pizzas.


Saving up for a bigger, thicker, rectangular stone.





suave's picture
suave

Just so that you know, I bake on quarry tiles, I sprayed water on them numerous times, they've been through 250-300 cycles, I have not lost a single one.

mredwood's picture
mredwood

I found a wonderfully thick stone for bread at Bobs Red Mill. About  $29.00 a few years ago. I believe it was made locally. I think it is Best, but my memory may fail me. I also have seen many Pizza stones at garage sales especially the large church rummage sales. Odd lots or Big Lots, can't remember the name next to Office Depot at Mall 205 always carries pizza stones for around $10.00. They are not the thinest. Also Ross on 82 often has them.  I spray my bread whether on the bread stone or pizza and never had a problem. Now I use the Lava rocks in the bottom of the oven so I don't feel the need to spray. 


Try used restaurant supply for a peel. Boxer down town always has peels. Maybe they would have a stone. 


Love to hear what you find in Portland. It always changes and it's hard to keep up.


Mariah


 

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

pizza stone and metal holder for $10 about a month ago in the back to college displays.


 

Ali_Bakar's picture
Ali_Bakar

Hmm,May be my suggestion is useful for u.If u want to find quarry tiles ,then I think Egyptian Tiles can be fulfilled your requirements,try it and let me know whether u found what u needed.

pamperedchefkathy's picture
pamperedchefkathy

There is a HUGE difference between a Baking Stone and a Pizza stone.  While Pizza stones are made for Pizza's...Baking Stones are actually designed from natural clay (similar to the brick-lined ovens used in NY for pizza's) and at The Pampered Chef, we teach how to replace glass & aluminum with our Baking Stones.  The reason being, our stones are porous with hundred of tiny pores, allowing the excess moisture to be be retrieved from the crust and baking the crust to a crispness ... no soggy bottoms at all!!


If you check out my website @ www.pamperedchef.biz/kathyyellets and select "shop on-line", then select option 2 from the next screen...the selection of Baking Stones are on the left.  Please contact me through my website before placing your order, as a member of this loop, you'll receive a flat rate of $4.25 shipping.


The Pumpkin Bread recipe I tried from this website baked 4 loaves in 30 minutes and they were just amazing...both in looks, texture and taste!!


Kathy Yellets


Sr. Executive Director


The Pampered Chef


kathy.yellets@gmail.com


 

pamperedchefkathy's picture
pamperedchefkathy

through Wal-Mart, Bed Bath and Beyond...


 


Why not try the ones we carry at The Pampered Chef!!


 


 

MommaT's picture
MommaT

I have a large rectangular pizza stone that I bought at Bed Bath adn Beyond with a 20% off coupon AND some unglazed quarry tiles from Home Depot - 6 at 49 cents each.    


I do find that the thicker stone does a better job, but frankly I think the quarry tiles are just fine.  Try Home Depot, if you have that in your area.


Good luck!


MommaT

Elagins's picture
Elagins

unless you know for certain that the clay doesn't contain toxic substances that can leach out when the tile is wet or at high heat, i'd be careful. there's all sorts of nasty stuff that's fine to walk on, but not recommended for digestive systems, brain cells and other living creatures. better to use a stone made out of an NSF or FDA-approved substance

Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Googling for ""unglazed quarry tiles" oven" brings up over 87,000 results.  So while I don't vouch for the safety and do not take responsibility for any side effects you may experience if you choose to try them, I can say with certainty that many, many people -- including Julia Child, reportedly -- have used unglazed quarry tiles in their ovens.  Plain old clay tiles, just cooked mud, not Purgo or any other weird composite or glazed tiles.  Though I've used some weird glazed tiles in my oven too and my children have  have yet to grow any beaks or tentacles... but I wouldn't recommend it.

Liam's picture
Liam

Thanks for the tip Stan.  I was worried about that myself.


Regards


L

jannrn's picture
jannrn

I had looked high and low and either found the perfect stone at a price I could afford and the shipping was outrageous OR couldn't find an affordable stone at all....that is until I stumbles upon the site webstaurantstore.com. I got a large stone for only $10!! With purchasing two of them, even with shipping it was STILL cheaper than Bed Bath and Beyond or ALOT of other sites!! It is an AWESOME stone and is made from the same material used in bread/pizza ovens. Check it out!! www.webstaurantstore.com


Jannrn

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

thouse are not the same


they are ceramic stones not cordierite and they are thin only 3/8 inch where the cordierite are between 5/8 to a full inch,


thay are light duty and not for a person that bakes every day i tried one of thouse and while baking a rye bread some of the water i use for steem hit the stone and i nice size piece cracked off so perfictly that i can still can use the stone but it is now like a two piece jig-saw puzzle,


so remember even though they are only 10 dollars you are most defenitly getting what you pay for.

dstroy's picture
dstroy

I bought Floyd a nice pizza stone at the Troutdale Outlet Mall and it cracked. Well, so did the tiles and the cheap stone we got at Fred Meyer that he'd been using before that, and so did our oven coil heating unit (which really scared the pants off our kids - that's not an experience I recommend to anyone! We couldn't even boil spaghetti for a month after that without our son freaking out about the steam!)


In the end, I'd say he's had much better luck with the one we got off Amazon - not as inexpensive as all the other options, unless you count the price of them all together since they kept exploding! ;) We've had it for 2 years now and he's managed not to break it yet.


 


(arg! Edited because I put the wrong link in there! The stone is $37.99 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping.)

shadowace's picture
shadowace

Google "cordierite kiln shelves", you will find lots of different shapes for about 1/2 of what pizza stones/baking stones cost.


If you are worried about "unknown substances" leaching out etc.  Then heat several times at 500+ until all volatiles are outgassed and use parchment paper under your dough.

mredwood's picture
mredwood

Georgies in North Portland sells many different kiln shelves. Don't skimp on your baking stone or you will be going through this process again.


Try a pampered chef or superstone baker. A cast iron pan and cover, can use cast iron pan without cover. Another option is fool yourself. Set aside as much money as you can afford. Next month do it again. I bet if you think about it you probably can find many of life's pleasures you can say no to for a short time and the money adds up quickly. Another way to think of it is the saving you are doing by baking your own bread. 


Happy shopping and baking.


Mariah

Liam's picture
Liam

What is that saying????


Great minds think alike.......................  I always make a point of ignoring the last half.


(Which is, for those who are not familiar with the saying:  Fools seldom differ)


Thanks to all the great minds


L

mredwood's picture
mredwood

I bought my baking stone at Bob's. They no longer sell them. Manufacture is Best Manufacturing in Portland Oregon. They have the stone on line in their catalogue but I couldn't find a way to a price sheet or ordering. The retail catalogue lists it and the commercial catalogue gives their phone number. I left a message for Thea in customer service to call me with pricing and ordering info. You can do the same. I will post it as soon as I know. It may be as simple as driving out there and picking it up. It is 5/8  and 14 x 16 porous ceramic.  I have splashed and sprayed and it's still going strong. I remember it being very reasonably priced. My next stone will be a larger one.


Mariah  



BEST


@P.0. Box 2009'1 Portland, 0R 97294


Tel. {503) 253-1528


Fax 1503) 253-0878 Toil f ree {800) 500-1528


 



 


 


 


 


 

Barbara Krauss's picture
Barbara Krauss

Thicker is better in terms of heat retention and durability, but having used a one-inch thick baking stone for about 2 years now, I find I've had to plan on considerably more time for my stone to heat up to the desired temperature. 

salma's picture
salma

Thicker is better! I am sure it will help retain more heat.  When I bought my unglazed tiles at Home Depot, since they were so cheap, I bought 9 not knowing how many will fit.  Only 6 fit and 3 are laying around in case any cracked.  I am thinking of buying 3 more and laying them under (so they stay clean) the ones I already have in the oven.  This will provide almost an inch of thickness.


Salma


 

pamperedchefkathy's picture
pamperedchefkathy

www.pamperedchef.biz/kathyyellets


Select Shop Online


then enter Option 2 for individual order and look at Stoneware listed on the left.


 


Kathy

mredwood's picture
mredwood

I taked to Best Manufacturing today. They make only one size and do not sell to individuals. The stores that sell them and have had an order recently are:


Mirador, Pasta works, Sweetwares, SurLa Tab,  Bob's has an order in that is ready to be shipped. The stones are 5/8" and made of that Cord....stuff. I don't know how to spell it. It has been mentioned previously. The Pizza peels are made of alder. Going to one of these stores is a good option if you don't want mail order.


Mariah 

jimrich17's picture
jimrich17

I have been using unglazed 6" quarry tiles to line the shelf in my oven for over 15 years. I have two rows of four tiles each plus one row of 4 half-tiles.


There is still space around the edges to allow air circulation. I have never had any problem with cracking.


I have also used thicker pizza stones and -honestly-I can see no difference in the results. The giggest difference is that I can bake six loaves at a time instead of two-


                                                  Jim

Liam's picture
Liam

Hi


I've been using an el cheapo pizza stone that I purchased at Benix (a  local Toronto Ontario  kitchen stuff discount store)  I have also seen them at stores like Sears.  I'd be willing to bet that Walmart carries them too.   Often they are  between 14 and 16" round.  My daughter- in- law found a rectangular one for me so now it is possible to bake two loaves at a time.  This is usually more than enough for the two of us  (me and the fella - yes Liam is a nom de plume!)


If it is possible could you post a picture of these quarry tiles?  I did a little checking around at tile stores, but I get put off by the sales people who try to tell you that there is a) no such thing b) no-one stocks them c) they have no idea of what I am talking about.  If I knew what I was actually looking for I would have more courage to try to find them.  It would be so nice to be able to utilize more of the oven rack.


Thanks so much


L (ouise)

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Here are mine.



They are 12 inch square.  I found them at Home Depot for 99 cents each.  I also picked up a special saw blade for three bucks so I could cut them down to fit my oven.

Liam's picture
Liam

Thank you so much for the photos.  Now I see what I am looking for!  We have a Home Depot nearby so I think I'll try that very soon.


I truly appreciate all the tips, I'll be writing them down and checking them out.  My weekly visits to my debilitated dad takes me by a couple of tile places.


The Hunt Is On!!!!


Again, many thanks to all


L(ouise)

OldWoodenSpoon's picture
OldWoodenSpoon

locally.  I first found the manufacturer name, then called around till a tile shop admitted they had heard of them, then I paid them a visit.


http://www.summitville.com/QuarryTile.htm


This is just one manufacturer.  There are others.  Good luck!


OldWoodenSpoon

Reid Heilig's picture
Reid Heilig

Brick yards in my area carry fire bricks in the standard size and in half thickness size for stoves. I used these for my outside wood fired oven. Why can these not be used in a regular oven? They seem to me to be ideal. They cost less than $2.00 each and at some places half that for the half thickness size plus they can be cut to fit by most tile companies or well equipped brick masons. As to their safety, they have been used for a long time in brick ovens to bake the bread and pizza on with no known problems. Reid Heilig

goody1006's picture
goody1006

As there have been some questions/comments on the safety of these quarry's...the tile outlett asked while I was there--they are fine for oven use, and are purchased often for that purpose.

They knew exactly what the tile gal didn't know to ask.

Hope that clarifies things a bit. I will take photos of them once they arrive.

Thanks again everyone for your imput!

sirden1959usa's picture
sirden1959usa

I wonder how granite stone would work that they use for granite counters, untreated. raw stone.

Elagins's picture
Elagins

if you take a close look at a piece of granite, you'll see a lot of small, natural fractures in the stone -- plus lots that you won't see. those fractures are weak points that can collect moisture, which in turn will vaporize into steam and expand the fractures. over time -- whether it's days, weeks or months -- the beautiful piece of granite will come apart.


it's beautiful stuff and makes gorgeous counters, but I'd look for something more stable, either quarry tile or specially engineered baking stones. there's lots of discussion here about stones vs tiles, for example, http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/129/baking-stones and http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/507/tiles-baking-stones


Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com