The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

I cannot make sense of this baker's math for this recipe...

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Jean-Paul's picture
Jean-Paul

I cannot make sense of this baker's math for this recipe...

Help, I cannot make sense of the online tutorials for bakers math. And then when I found Jeremy Shapiro's sourdough recipe, his math sends my wittle bwain into a tailspin. What I want to do is to make 2 (two)  500 gram boules using his recipe.


Please help me out. Thanks!


http://sourdough.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.ShowItem&g2_itemId=1914


 

Yumarama's picture
Yumarama

and the total recipe given make 25.3 kg, probably the easiest thing is to divide all the weights by 25.3


So the first feeding says the 100% flour weight is 1500g. Divide that by 25.3 and you have 52.9 - let's call it 53g. So there's your "100%" value that everything else is based on.


This is unlikely to be the "official" way of getting a ratio using Baker's Percentages but it would certainly work. Go with it (on paper) and see if the final outcome is a total of 1000g.

suave's picture
suave

Frankly, if I were you, I would take another look at his schedule, and consider if I have proper level of dedication, because what I see in that recipe is very little sleep.  As far as math goes, if you want 2 500 g. pieces of dough just divide everything by 25, and if you want the baked bread weigh about 500 g. the factor should be around 21.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

There are easier ways to make sourdough bread and learn about bakers percents. That page gives me a headache.


Eric

LeadDog's picture
LeadDog

I think the following spreadsheet will give you the information that you want.


http://www.editgrid.com/user/leaddog/Multigrain_Sourdough_2_builds.xls

blockkevin's picture
blockkevin

There is a very simple method for figuring out new yield based on weight measurements. simply divide the new yield in this case 1000g by the old yield in this case 25,310g and you get a conversion factor, in this case it is 0.03951. Then simply multiply all of the weights by the conversion factor to get the new yield. By the way this is a good excuse to use the M+ (memory) button on the calculator so you don't have to type in 0.03951 every time.


 


Example for first feeding



  • Flour 1500g * 0.03951=59g

  • Water 750g * 0.03951=30g

  • Levain 1200g * 0.03951=47g


 


and so on and so forth...