The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Portuguese Bread recipe search

beccad18's picture
beccad18

Portuguese Bread recipe search

Hi there,

I'm hoping someone can help me find a recipe for a bread I know as Porguguese Bread.  I've serched for it and I'll I've found is recipes for Portuguese Sweet Bread. 

The bread I had was white bread that had a hard bottom with a chewy crust and was usually a free form loaf.  The bread itself was similar in texture and moisture to rye bread.  I had it in northern New Jersey, but I was just discussing it with my roommate who also ate it in Philidelphia. 

Does anyone know what I'm describing and can maybe point me in a direction of a recipe?  Maybe this bread has another name?

Thanks a lot for any help!

Becca

audra36274's picture
audra36274

a video. I know you are wanting BREAD, but the roll recipe I mentioned is the same just reshaped. You'll see. He hooked me up a year or so ago for my father in law who used to be stationed in Rhode Island back in his Navy days. He loves it. Just type it in the search box above left.

                                                                   Audra

p.s. Mark has lots of other cool videos too. His bakery is opened now so you will just have to search out his recipes through here, his website doesn't offer them anymore.

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

was it shaped like a small football and did it have flour or bread crumbs on the top?

beccad18's picture
beccad18

It's been awhile since I had it, but in my memory it was a oblong, so I supppose like a football, but there were no breadcrumbs, and I don't think any flour.

Also I remember the bread being very airy on the inside sometimes with big holes in it.

I really don't think it's the same as the sweet bread.  This wasn't sweet.  We used it for sandwiches and toast.

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

http://www.portuguesefood.com/acatalog/Azores_.html 

Is this what you are thinking of? It tastes very much like a hard roll/Italian bread. I'm sure it is a basic flour/water/yeast/salt dough and that the shaping makes it unique. Very common in southern New England.

Betty

 

 

beccad18's picture
beccad18

Yes!  That's the kind of bread I'm thinking of. 

bakermomof4's picture
bakermomof4

I think what you might be talking about are the Papo Secos they are a Portuguese roll that are very popular in the Portuguese bakeries (at least in California they are), also when we spent a summer in Terceira, Azores, Portugal we had them delivered fresh at our door every morning!

You can try these links -

http://fullbellies.blogspot.com/2007/04/portuguese-bread-rolls-papo-secos.html

http://www.recipezaar.com/Crusty-Buns-60191

I also have Ana Patuleia Ortins book - Portuguese Homestyle Cooking that has the recipe -

http://www.portuguesecooking.com/home

 

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

I believe what you're looking for is called Portuguese Water Bread around the San Francisco Bay Area.  Sweet bread is what most people associate with Portuguese bread.

The following is a recipe that matches what you have described.  It's a simple bread that goes by the name, "Portuguese Farm Bread":

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Portuguese-Farm-Bread-232275

+Wild-Yeast

P.S. I've seen this bread made using plastic bin boxes.  It's stetch-folded every 45 minutes three consecutive times (very wet dough is where the "water bread" part comes from).  Wonder if this is where the no-knead bread came from?