The Fresh Loaf

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CAphyl

I divided a Multi-Grain loaf and baked the first one and froze the other late last year.  This is the frozen loaf. I defrosted it and then did a series of stretch-and-folds, adding water along the way as the dough was dry. I have had a tendency to add more flour than I should when the dough feels too wet (I am working on this and getting better, but I made this bread and froze it before I learned my lesson....).  The loaf tasted good as my husband gave it the thumbs up, particularly for crustiness, but I was disappointed with the oven spring and the crumb.  Always learning!   Phyllis

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CAphyl

I just took this out of the oven, and hoping that

when we cut it for lunch I will see excellent crumb.  I was pleased that there was good oven spring on this one, so I do have my hopes up.  I experimented a bit on this loaf and used more white flour than wheat, as was called for in the recipe.  I also made enough for two loaves, so I froze this dough.

After defrosting in the fridge, I did a series of stretch and folds and  sprayed it with a little water, as I believe I haven't had high enough hydration in my doughs to get the crumb (and bigger holes) that I am looking for.  I returned it to the fridge to proof and then took it out right before I went to bed.

 

Fingers crossed that I make progress in my quest for the perfect crumb, which I am sure is difficult to ever achieve! Phyllis

p.s.  I finally figured out how to add more photos, but I will keep practicing on this as well to get better.  Thanks to all of you for the tips....I am using them all.

 

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

Had to make some muffins today to share with friends.  I usually make them with sourdough, but didn't today.  It's a good recipe; I added the toasted almonds to it because I always love muffins with both fruit and nuts. I got the blood oranges from the farmer's market on Sunday.

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CAphyl

It is very exciting.  I have always wanted to bake a Tartine loaf and now I have done it. There certainly were trials along the way.  I weighed out the ingredients and just felt it was too much water.  The dough hydration seemed high, so I had to add some flour during the turn-and-folds.  It seemed to work out OK in the end.  I also did more turn-and-folds to get the dough to where I thought it would work. I am very anxious to see the crumb. I have to let it cool down, but can't wait to try it for lunch and see what rating my husband gives it.....I used the recipe below.

http://www.crumblycookie.net/2011/05/29/tartine-country-bread/

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CAphyl

Thanks so much to blueboy2419 for posting the recipe for this French bread.  It looks fantastic.  Just letting it cool down for lunch.  Ironically, blueboy2419 mentioned adding stout to the bread (I didn't) and getting it at the Liverpool Organic Brewery in England, and, while we live in California, my husband is from Liverpool, and we were just there over the holidays visiting with his family.  We go often, so I hope we can visit the brewery.  I saw on their web site that there is a big beer festival when we are visiting, so my husband will be "made up" with that.  It's really a small world.

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CAphyl

I had been making more classic sourdough lately, so I knew I had to do something heavier, with different flours.  It worked well for sandwiches for lunch.  The crumb was very even throughout.  It's a nice recipe I have made before and attached the link below.  It takes a couple of days, so you have to plan ahead!

http://www.breadtopia.com/whole-grain-sourdough/

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CAphyl

I've had varying success with the crumb on a number of loaves.  I think this is one of my best efforts so far, but far from perfect as I compare to other wonderful bread posts I see on this site.   Interested in opinions on this.  Thanks.  Phyllis

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CAphyl

This is one of my all-time favorites.  I love the Classic sourdough baked in the LaCloche.  The crust usually comes out very well, and no tray with water is needed in the bottom of the oven. I bought a Bordelaise scorer online for about $12, and it really helps with the scoring.  Recently, I have used primarily white sourdough starter, but I have added a touch of whole wheat and rye starter, which give the bread a bit of a different taste.  It's fun to experiment.

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

 When my husband and i were in England for the holidays, I brought my sourdough starter with me. When our visit was nearing the end, I wanted to use up the fresh ingredients on hand for one last bake.  I made a classic sourdough recipe and after letting it proof overnight, I diced up tomatoes, drained them on paper towels and then seasoned them with salt and pepper, Italian seasoning and garlic powder.  While that sat for a bit, I did a number of stretch and folds with the dough.  I had some olives left, so I cut those up and kneaded the pieces into one loaf.  I flattened both of the loaves and laid in mozzarella cheese and then layered it with the tomato mixture.  I left an inch around and sealed them both shut.  I had some excellent grana padano cheese, so I grated it and put it on top of each loaf.  After baking for some time, I put mozzarella on top as well during the final few minutes of the bake.

My English family and friends really enjoyed it.  One friend made homemade leek and potato soup and heated the bread up to have for dinner.  I gave the other loaf to my nieces and their husbands.  My husband and i didn't even try them, so I will definitely have to make them again!

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CAphyl

I had a request to make crusty sourdough rolls when my husband and I were visiting family in England for the holidays.  I brought along my sourdough starter in checked luggage (TSA searched it), but the "baby" white and rye sourdough starters came through very well.  In fact, they performed better than the "mother" sourdough starters back in the U.S. performed recently.  I used the recipe below, but divided the loaf into rolls (and I didn't have my LaCloche, so.just used parchment paper and plenty of water in the bottom of the oven tray to create the steam to make the rolls crusty).  English friends and family gave the rolls the thumbs up.  I will definitely make them again now that I am back stateside.

 

http://breadmakingblog.breadexperience.com/2012/02/classic-sourdough-in-la-cloche.html

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