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CAphyl

I made my first gluten-free sourdough loaf, adapted from a recipe by Nicole Hunn in her book, Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread. (I've attached a link to her blog site below.)  I made a sourdough starter that was gluten-free, per her instructions in the book.  It doesn't work that well (probably my fault), so I may try and redo it, as I froze the liquid starter before I made the Mother starter.  Gluten-free bread is always such a disappointment compared to my regular sourdough, but this was the best I've made so far.  It's always heavy and has a real gluten-free taste to me, but it was OK. It does have a bit of the sourdough taste. I actually added a little yeast during the process because I didn't believe the starter was going to perform well.

The crumb was less dense than I have had with other gluten-free loaves I have made in the past.

I actually used King Arthur Ancient Grains and whole wheat gluten-free flours to make the bread (which deviated from her recipe), combined with the starter I made earlier. I'll have to try it again to see if I can improve each time.

http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

When I was in the UK last week, I made David's excellent recipe below.  As I have done many times in the past, I prepared the dough and froze half of it to bake later.  I hadn't tried this with baguettes, so I was interested in how it would turn out.  I froze the dough for four days. On the first batch, I had a heck of a time moving them, as I didn't have all the tools I have in my home kitchen.  They got a bit flat as I moved them. For the second batch, I bought a metal baguette baker with tiny holes that I used for the final proof and baking, and this worked much better for me.

I defrosted the dough overnight in the fridge, and it was ready to go the next morning.  I followed the recipe instructions from there, placing the new baguette baker on a heated stone.

My husband really enjoyed these baguettes, as did our UK friends who tried them.  The taste was wonderful and the crumb fine. My husband loved the really crusty crust.

San Joaquin Sourdough Baguettes

Total ingredients

Wt (g)

Bakers %

AP Flour

479

89

WW Flour

33

6

Medium rye Flour

29

5

Water

392

72

Salt

10

1.8

Liquid starter

17

3

Total

960

176.8

9.2% of the flour is pre-fermented

Liquid Levain ingredients

Wt (g)

Bakers %

AP Flour

29

70

WW Flour

8

20

Medium rye Flour

4

10

Water

42

100

Liquid starter

17

40

Total

100

240

 

Final dough ingredients

Wt (g)

AP Flour

450

WW Flour

25

Medium rye Flour

25

Water

350

Salt

10

Liquid levain

100

Total

960

 

Method

  1. Mix the levain by dissolving the liquid starter in the water, then add the flours and mix well. Ferment at room temperature, covered tightly, until the surface is bubbly and wrinkled. (8-12 hours)
  2. Dissolve the levain in the water, add the flours and mix to a shaggy mass. Cover and autolyse for 30 minutes.
  3. Add the salt and mix to incorporate.
  4. Transfer to a clean, lightly oiled bowl and cover tightly.
  5. Bulk ferment for 3-4 hours with stretch and folds in the bowl every 30 minutes for the first 2 hours, then a stretch and fold on the board after 2.5 hours. The dough should have expanded by about 50% and be full of small bubbles.
  6. Refrigerate the dough for 18-24 hours.
  7. Take the dough out of the refrigerator and transfer it to a lightly floured board.
  8. Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces and pre-shape as logs or round.
  9. Cover the pieces and allow them to rest for 60 minutes.
  10. Shape as baguettes and proof for 45 minutes, covered.
  11. Pre-heat the oven to 500ºF with a baking stone and steaming apparatus in place.
  12. Transfer the baguettes to your peel. Turn down the oven to 480ºF. Score the loaves and load them onto your baking stone.
  13. Bake with steam for 10 minutes, then remove your steaming apparatus and continue to bake for another 10-12 minutes. (Note: After 10 minutes, I switched my oven to convection bake and turned the temperature down to 455ºF.)
  14. Remove the loaves to a cooling rack, and cool for at least 30 minutes before serving.

 

 

 

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

I adapted the Hamelman recipe below, as I really wanted to make a multi-grain bread with a soaker. I didn't have any bulghur, so I used cous cous instead. I continue to go for the bold crust, so I allow a little extra time on the bake.

It is just so much fun getting that soaker going, isn't it?

The liquid levain got so bubbly and smelled great.  I had to push this a bit, as I indicated in the recipe below.

I love my covered baker and used it for this recipe. I have started using the oblong covered baker a bit more with better results than my early bakes.  I never tried this before, but for this bake I proofed the dough in the baker (with a bit of cornmeal underneath) and pre-heated the lid. I have always found it difficult to transfer the proofed dough to the baker, even using parchment paper.  This new system worked well, with a nice bake underneath and a bold bake on top.  In fact, in the past the bread would be a little overdone underneath, and this was just about perfect, so I think this is my new method for this baker. There was good oven spring as well and decent height.

I am always concerned about the crumb, but it was fine for a dense bread like this.

I got in trouble with my husband as I snatched his sandwich for a photo just as he was getting ready to take a bite!  The bread was crusty, tangy and very nutty.  Delicious.  It's nice to know that you can vary the soaker and still have very good results.  Phyllis

Five-Grain Levain Bread

Adapted from Jeffrey Hamelman’s Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes

Makes 3 medium loaves
Overall formula
Bread flour 680 g
Whole wheat flour 226 g
Cous cous 82 g (I didn’t have Bulghur as called for in the recipe, so I used the same amount of cous cous)

Flaxseeds 82 g

Sunflower seeds 71 g

Oats 71 g

Water 890 g
Salt 22 g

Total 2.13 kg


Liquid Levain build
Bread flour 226.8 g
Water 283.5 g
Mature culture (liquid)  45 g


Soaker

Cous cous 82 g

Flaxseeds 82 g

Sunflower seeds 71 g

Oats 71 g

Water, boiling 400 g

Salt 5 g (1 teaspoon)

 

Final Dough
Bread flour 453 g
Whole-wheat flour  226 g
Water 250 g

Salt 17 g (1 tablespoon)
Soaker all of the above
Levain all less 3 tablespoons

 

Baker Percentage

Bread flour 75%

Whole wheat flour 25%

Cous cous  9.2%

Flaxseeds 9.2%

Sunflower seeds 7.7%

Oats 7.7%

Water 98%

Salt 2.5%
Total 235.1%

METHOD

  1. Liquid-levain build: Make the final build 12 - 16 hours before the final mix.  I ran out of time, so I accelerated this to seven hours, placing the hot soaker on top of the levain build bowl.
  2.  Soaker: Make the soaker at the same time when making levain build. Pour the boiling water over the grain blend and salt, mix thoroughly. Put it in a covered container and sit at room temperature.

3.  Mixing: Add all the ingredients to the mixing bowl except the salt. Mix or stir the ingredients together until it becomes a shaggy mass. Cover the bowl with cling wrap or plastic bag and let it stand for an autolyse phase for 20 -60 minutes. At the end of the autolyse, sprinkle the salt over the surface of the dough and mix on a medium speed for 3 -5 minutes until the medium gluten development is achieved.

4.  Bulk fermentation: 1 to 1 ½ hours or 2 hours if the dough is retarded overnight. (I bulk fermented for 2 hours with a fold over with my dough scraper at the 1 hour mark).

5.  Folding: If the fermentation is 1 ½ hours, fold once after 45 minutes.

6.  Dividing and shaping: Divide the dough into three equal pieces, pre-shape the dough into round. Cover the dough with tea towel and let it rest for 15 minutes. Final-shape the dough into either oblong or round. (I froze the other two loaves, which were a touch smaller than the one I baked.  It will be interesting to see how these come out when I bake them later).

7.  Final fermentation (proofing): Retard the loaves in the refrigerator over night.

(I baked my loaf in my covered baker.  I proofed the loaf in the bottom of the covered baker with cornmeal on the bottom.  I preheated the top of the baker at 500 degrees and allowed the loaf to warm up at room temperature while the oven preheated.  I baked the loaf with the cover on for 30 minutes at 500 degrees and then took the lid off and lowered the oven to 435 degrees convection.  If you don’t have a covered baker, the original recipe instructions follow).

8.  Baking: with normal steam, 235C for 40 45 mins, turn the loaves half way through the bake.

 

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

I was inspired by Syd's bake to try my first Pain de Campagne.  I wasn't happy with the first bake, although my husband really enjoyed the taste and texture of the bread.  It was extremely light and made great sandwiches. As I often do, I froze the other half of the dough to make at a later date, and I baked it today.  As usual, my second bake from the frozen loaf turned out better than the first bake from fresh.  The first loaf didn't get much height, but had good crumb. The second loaf had much better oven spring and more height. Both had excellent, tangy taste. I have made a crumb comparison between the two loaves below. The first crumb shot is from the fresh loaf; the second is from the bake today. 

Crumb from the first bake.

Pain de Campagne (adapted from Syd’s recipe)

Levain

  • 50g mature whole wheat starter (mine was mixed)
  • 100g water
  • 100g whole wheat flour

Allow to peak.  This could take from 4-10 hours.  Mine took 8 hours.

Main Dough

  • 200g of the levain
  • 350g water
  • 50g rye
  • 1/2 tsp diastatic malt powder
  • 450g bread flour

Disperse the levain in the water with a wire whisk until there is a good foam on top. Next, whisk in rye and malt powder.  Then add bread flour with spatula and mix until all the flour has been moistened.

  • autolyse for 50-60 minutes

Then:

  • add 10g salt
  • knead to medium gluten development (if the dough is sticky, you can use your dough scraper.  Try not to add more flour.  Just enough for your surface and hands.

Now:

  • bulk ferment for 1-2 hours with a turn at 30 minutes (I left the dough for 2 hours and turned twice).

Next:

  • pre-shape
  • rest 10 minutes
  • final shape

Put into well floured banneton and after about half an hour cover and:

  • retard for 12 hours in the fridge
  • let the dough warm up just before the bake; you’ll see it rise a bit more

Bake

  •  at 500F in a covered baker for 30 minutes

Then:

  • Remove the lid and reduce heat to 435 convection, baking for another 20 - 25 minutes

If you don’t have a covered baker (Syd’s original instructions):

Bake

  •  at 230 C with steam for 15 minutes

Then:

  • reduce heat to 200 C and bake for a further 30 - 35 minutes

The proportionately large amount of levain in this recipe means that the dough develops really quickly hence the relatively short bulk fermentation time.

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

My experiments continued this morning, as I baked another dough I had frozen very recently.  This was a variation of Khalid's recipe that I have made a couple of times.  I really enjoy this bread as it has lots of different grains in the soaker, and it is ready to go so quickly.  I defrosted the loaf yesterday in the fridge and took it out at 6 a.m. this morning.  (We had to get up early here in California to see the Liverpool-Chelsea game, as my husband is from Liverpool.  Unfortunately, their winning streak was snapped today, creating a shadow over their chance to win the league.....we are suffering along with our family and friends in Liverpool today.  It certainly was not the best start to the day.  Then, we saw that the wind knocked over our lime tree and broke its clay pot. And you know about the lime shortage right now!) Despite these setbacks, I pushed forward with my bread experiment.

I took the dough out of the fridge to warm up and did a preliminary shaping.  Khalid shared a nice illustration for batard shaping, link below.

 http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/24865/shaping-batard

I used my LaCloche oblong covered baker, which I do not use as much as my round domed LaCloche.  I have to say that I think the crust turns out better in the LaCloche than when I use the heated stone and steam.

The bread I made today from frozen is on the left; the bread I made last week per the recipe (baked on the stone with steam) is on the right.  I am baking longer to get the bold crust, and I do think that makes a real difference. For whatever reason, the scoring worked a lot better today than last week as well.

I still struggle with the shaping and transfer of dough to the preheated baker.  I had to use parchment paper as the dough was quite sticky. It did not go into the oblong baker easily (that's probably why I don't use this one as much), and I was concerned that I botched it.  The day was certainly going that way....

I was pleased that the loaf looked good as I took the lid off.  I preheated the baker and lid at 500 degrees, and then baked it lid on for 30 minutes before lowering the temperature to 435 convention for another 20-25 minutes with the lid off.

Here is the crumb from the bake today with the frozen loaf.

This is the crumb from the loaf I baked fresh on the preheated stone with steam.

I would say the crumb is good in both, but perhaps just slightly better in the frozen loaf.  The taste of the frozen loaf was great, very tangy with crispy crust and moist interior.

We enjoyed our sandwiches for lunch.  I guess I will continue with my bread experiments, as my husband really enjoyed this loaf!

The original recipe I used is below.  Phyllis

Sourdough with Rye, Spelt and Soaker

Prefermented flour %

30%

Overall Recipe

Soaker

 

Bakers %

Weight

 

 

 

 

Bread flour

47%

450

grams

Coarse Corn Meal

30

grams

Whole Spelt flour

11%

106

grams

Couscous

30

grams

Whole Rye flour

26%

250

grams

Rolled Oats

60

grams

Coarse corn meal

5%

45

grams

Water

250

grams

Couscous

5%

45

grams

Salt

6

grams

Rolled Oats

6%

60

grams

Flax Seeds

25

grams

Water

84%

800

grams

Sesame Seeds

5

grams

Salt

2%

18

grams

 

 

 

Total

187%

1774

grams

Total

406

grams

Rye Sour

Final Dough

Whole Rye flour

60%

150

grams

Bread Flour

450

grams

 AP Flour

           40%

      100

grams

Whole Spelt Flour

106

grams

Water

100%

250

grams

Water

300

grams

Mixed Starter

10%

50

grams

Salt

12

grams

Total

 

550

grams

Rye Sour

550

grams

 

 

 

 

All Soaker

406

grams

 

 

 

 

Total

1824

grams

Prepare the rye sour by adding a tablespoon and a half of your active rye starter to the 250g water, and mix well to disperse. Add the flour, mix well, and let stand for 8-12 hours at room temperature. To prepare the soaker, weigh all soaker ingredients into a bowl, and then add the boiling water to the soaker. Mix well, cover, and let stand until overnight or until your rye sour is ready.

The next day, mix all ingredients using a stand mixer for 7-10 minutes. The dough will remain relatively sticky, so try to resist adding any flour at this stage. Shape as a round and let ferment in an oiled bowl for 2 hours at preferably 78 F, folding it using your scraper at the 1 hour mark. By the end of bulk fermentation, scrape your dough onto a heavily floured surface, pat the dough even, divide into the desired dough pieces, and round each piece leaving them to rest for 15- 20 min, covered. Shape your dough into a batard (see helpful videos on this). I did the final shaping and then placed the dough on parchment paper on a peel. You can also use your proofing basket.  Dust your basket with a mixture of all purpose flour and rice flour, and shape your dough and invert it smooth side down into the basket. The final fermentation will be only 45 minutes, but watch the dough NOT the clock. Preheat your oven at this stage with a stone in place to 500F.   Have your steaming apparatus in place. When ready, invert the dough on baking paper lined peel/ board and score it before placing on the baking stone. Place boiling water into steaming tray. Bake for 15 minutes with steam, and then remove the steaming tray and reduce the temperature to 450F for another 25-30  minutes or so. This last loaf turned out so big, so it needed a bit more baking time.  Be sure to adjust based on the size and the kind of crust you prefer. Remember, you can experiment with different ingredients in the soaker--that's the really fun part.

Cool on wire rack before slicing.

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

I did another experiment.  A few weeks ago, I made my first Vermont sourdough.  I froze half the dough to bake later.  The photo at top is the loaf I made today with the frozen dough. (The dough was frozen after bulk fermentation).  I defrosted it in the refrigerator and took it out last night.  It was still pretty cold (with a small frozen center), so I let it warm up and did three stretch and folds and sprayed a little water on the dough as it was stiff. Then, before I went to bed, I put the shaped boule into the banneton, which was coated with brown rice flour.  It stayed on the counter for eight hours. I was concerned when I looked at it in the morning as it didn't pop up much overnight.

Then, I baked it at 500 degrees in my LaCloche baker for 30 minutes, and then took the lid off for another 25 minutes at 435 convection. It had some oven spring and did pop up nicely. I wanted a darker crust for the second loaf.

The photo on the left is the loaf from the frozen dough; the one on the right is the first one I made. Both were excellent, but quite different. I did not use the LaCloche on the the one on the right, using the recipe below, which called for steaming. It is not necessary to steam with the LaCloche covered baker.

This is the crumb from the frozen loaf baked in the covered LaCloche today. I think the water I sprayed on the dough last night helped the crumb.

This is the crumb from the first loaf, which was baked on a stone with steaming.

My husband enjoyed his sandwich with the loaf I baked today!

Here is the Hamelman recipe, thanks to David.

Vermont Sourdough with Increased Whole Grain, from Hamelman's "Bread”

By dmsnyder

OVERALL FORMULA

 

 

Bread flour

1 lb 11.2 oz.

85.00%

Whole Rye

4.8 oz

15.00%

Water

1 lb 4.8oz

65.00%

Salt

.6 oz

1.90%

TOTAL YIELD

3 lbs 5.4 oz

169.90%

 

LIQUID LEVAIN BUILD

 

 

Bread flour

6.4 oz

100.00%

Water

8 oz

125.00%

Mature culture (liquid)

1.3 oz

20.00%

TOTAL

15.7 oz.

 

 

FINAL DOUGH

 

Bread flour (I used 1.55)

1lb 8 oz

Whole Rye (I used 6.8)

4.8 oz

 Water

12.8 oz

Liquid levain

14.4 oz

(all less 3 T)

Salt

.6 oz

TOTAL

3 lbs 5.4 oz

 

METHOD

  1. The night before mixing the final dough, feed the liquid levain as above. Ferment at room temperature overnight.
  2. Mix the final dough. Place all ingredients except the salt in the bowl and mix to a shaggy mass.
  3. Cover the bowl and autolyse for 20-60 minutes.
  4. Sprinkle the salt over the dough and mix using the paddle of a stand mixer for 2 minutes at Speed 1. Add small amounts of water or flour as needed to achieve a medium consistency dough.
  5. Switch to the dough hook and mix at Speed 2 for 6-8 minutes. There should be a coarse window pane.
  6. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl and ferment for 2.5 hours with one stretch and fold at 1.25 hours.
  7. Divide the dough into two equal parts and form into rounds. Place seam side up on the board.
  8. Cover with plastic and allow the dough to rest for 20-30 minutes.
  9. Form into boules or bâtards and place in bannetons or en couch. Cover well with plastic-wrap or place in food safe plastic bags.
  10. Refrigerate for 12-18 hours.
  11. The next day, remove the loaves from the refrigerator.
  12. Pre-heat the oven at 500ºF with a baking stone and steaming apparatus in place.
  13. After 45-60 minutes, pre-steam the oven. Transfer the loaves to a peel. Score them.
  14. Load the loaves onto the stone and pour ½ cup boiling water into the steaming apparatus. Turn the oven down to 460ºF.
  15. After 15 minutes, if you have a convection oven, turn it to convection bake at 435ºF. If you don't, leave the oven at 460ºF. Bake for another 25 minutes.
  16. Remove the loaves to a cooling rack.
  17. Cool completely before slicing.

 

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

I have had lots of fun tinkering with this recipe.  Today, I reduced the rye content again, added flax seeds and sprinkled in some sesame seeds.  Still working on my shaping, but the bread was tasty.  My husband really liked it. .

The crumb was quite good as I kept the hydration at higher levels, as compared to where I started. I know I will keep playing around with this recipe as it makes great bread.  Thanks again to Khalid for getting me going on this.

Sourdough with Rye, Spelt and Soaker

Prefermented flour %

30%

Overall Recipe

Soaker

 

Bakers %

Weight

 

 

 

 

Bread flour

47%

450

grams

Coarse Corn Meal

30

grams

Whole Spelt flour

11%

106

grams

Couscous

30

grams

Whole Rye flour

26%

250

grams

Rolled Oats

60

grams

Coarse corn meal

5%

45

grams

Water

250

grams

Couscous

5%

45

grams

Salt

6

grams

Rolled Oats

6%

60

grams

Flax Seeds

25

grams

Water

84%

800

grams

Sesame Seeds

5

grams

Salt

2%

18

grams

 

 

 

Total

187%

1774

grams

Total

406

grams

Rye Sour

Final Dough

Whole Rye flour

60%

150

grams

Bread Flour

450

grams

 AP Flour

           40%

      100

grams

Whole Spelt Flour

106

grams

Water

100%

250

grams

Water

300

grams

Mixed Starter

10%

50

grams

Salt

12

grams

Total

 

550

grams

Rye Sour

550

grams

 

 

 

 

All Soaker

406

grams

 

 

 

 

Total

1824

grams

Prepare the rye sour by adding a tablespoon and a half of your active rye starter to the 250g water, and mix well to disperse. Add the flour, mix well, and let stand for 8-12 hours at room temperature. To prepare the soaker, weigh all soaker ingredients into a bowl, and then add the boiling water to the soaker. Mix well, cover, and let stand until overnight or until your rye sour is ready.

The next day, mix all ingredients using a stand mixer for 7-10 minutes. The dough will remain relatively sticky, so try to resist adding any flour at this stage. Shape as a round and let ferment in an oiled bowl for 2 hours at preferably 78 F, folding it using your scraper at the 1 hour mark. By the end of bulk fermentation, scrape your dough onto a heavily floured surface, pat the dough even, divide into the desired dough pieces, and round each piece leaving them to rest for 15- 20 min, covered. Shape your dough into a batard (see helpful videos on this). I did the final shaping and then placed the dough on parchment paper on a peel. You can also use your proofing basket.  Dust your basket with a mixture of all purpose flour and rice flour, and shape your dough and invert it smooth side down into the basket. The final fermentation will be only 45 minutes, but watch the dough NOT the clock. Preheat your oven at this stage with a stone in place to 500F.   Have your steaming apparatus in place. When ready, invert the dough on baking paper lined peel/ board and score it before placing on the baking stone. Place boiling water into steaming tray. Bake for 15 minutes with steam, and then remove the steaming tray and reduce the temperature to 450F for another 25-30  minutes or so. This last loaf turned out so big, so it needed a bit more baking time.  Be sure to adjust based on the size and the kind of crust you prefer. Remember, you can experiment with different ingredients in the soaker--that's the really fun part.

Cool on wire rack before slicing.

 

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

I have been wanting to try Khlaid's recipe for some time. This is a fantastic and fun bread to make.   I baked one loaf yesterday, with some modifications. I made just a few changes, most notably the inclusion of cous cous rather than the coarse semolina in his original recipe.  (The link to his original recipe is below).   I also reduced the rye by 50 grams in the final dough and increased the bread flour, added a bit more water and used course rather than fine corn meal. Instead of a rye starter in the recipe, I also used a "mixed" starter (80 AP/20WW/10R), but fed it per Khalid's recipe to produce a wonderful rye sour. 

It was hard to believe that the proofing times were so short, but Khalid was right on...this was one of the fastest rising sourdough breads I have made.   It tasted fantastic.  We just had some for lunch, and my husband really enjoyed it. I thought the crumb was excellent.  My experiment was on the second loaf:  I had to go out, so I put the other loaf to proof overnight and made it this morning. I know this was a real risk with such a fast-rising bread, but I wondered what would happen.  It did seem to retard the rise, but it doubled in size fairly quickly. I do think it was overproofed, and I really botched the scoring (didn't help that it was overproofed), but it looks like it might taste OK.

The loaf I baked per the recipe instructions is on the left; the one I proofed overnight in the fridge is on the right. I should also mention that I shaped them a bit differently, so they do not have the same shape at all.

I liked the crumb and texture.  These are all shots from the first bread as we haven't cut the other one yet.  It will be interesting to see how that crumb turned out.  Baking is also an adventure and a chance to learn.  Hopefully, it will be even better next time (but I don't think I will repeat this experiment!)  Phyllis

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/32972/rye-sourdough-spelt-and-soaker

 

   
  
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
  
       
       
       
       
       
       
       

 

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

Well, I kind of screwed up today, but did my best to make up for it.  When I was making the Gluten-free Farmhouse bread earlier, i prepared too much yeast because I thought I really messed up the bread dough, but it turned out that I didn't!  As a result, I quickly found the most simple recipe for yeasted French bread and threw it together in minutes and baked it this afternoon.  It was really good!  My husband liked the crust.  I could have done a much better job on the shaping, however.  I'll do better next time.

The crumb was OK.  I always prefer to use my sourdough starter for bread, but this was a nice change.  I've included the link to the recipe below.

http://busycooks.about.com/od/yeastbreads/r/frenchbread.htm

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

I am always looking for good gluten-free recipes, and I came across this one online by Ali and Tom of Whole Life Nutrition.  I did make a number of modifications to the recipe after the first time I made it, which I have listed below.  It is a very dense, heavy bread and uses ground chia seeds and psyllium husk as the gluten-like substances.

The loaf looked very good going into the oven (left) and came out well fully baked.  I found that it may take a little longer to bake than the recipe to be fully done.

The crumb is dense and heavy, but the taste of the bread is quite tasty and tangy.

Wet Ingredients:

2 ½ cups warm water (105 to 110 degrees F)

2 ¼ teaspoons active dry yeast (1 package)

1 tablespoon agave nectar (you can use maple syrup as a substitute)

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1/4 cup ground chia seeds

1/4 cup whole psyllium husks

Dry Ingredients:

1 cup teff flour

1-1/2 cup all purpose gluten-free baking flour (like Bob’s Red Mill—reserve some flour for kneading)

½ cup brown rice flour

1 cup gluten-free oat flour

1 ½ teaspoons sea salt

¼ cup flax seeds

Topping:

Olive oil spray (or olive oil)

Toasted sesame seeds

Toasted sunflower seeds

Place the warm water in a bowl or 4-cup liquid glass measure. Add the yeast and agave nectar, whisk together. Let rest for 5 to 10 minutes to activate the yeast. The mixture should get foamy or bubbly.

While the yeast is activating, mix together the dry ingredients in a large bowl.

After the yeast is activated whisk in the olive oil, ground chia seeds (it's best to grind them yourself), and psyllium husks into the water-yeast mixture. Let stand for 2 to 3 minutes (not any longer) to let the chia and psyllium release their gelatinous substances. Whisk again.


Pour the wet ingredients into the dry and mix together with a large wooden spoon until thick. Then knead the dough on a floured wooden board to fully incorporate the flour. Add more teff and all-purpose flours, a little at a time, until the dough holds together and isn’t too sticky (about ¼ to ½ cup total). Don’t add too much flour, otherwise the dough will become very dense; it should still be slightly sticky. Form dough into a ball, place back into the large bowl, and cover with a damp towel. Place in a warm spot to rise until it is doubled in size, about one hour.


After the dough has risen, place a pizza stone in your oven. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Place a pan of water on the bottom rack of the oven (the one beneath the pizza stone).

Punch down the dough and turn out onto a lightly floured wooden board.  Stretch and fold the dough and then form into a round ball. Place on a square of parchment paper and score the dough with a shallow “tic-tac-toe” pattern on the top. Spray (or drizzle) with olive oil and sprinkle the seeds on top. Let rise for about 30 minutes in a warm place while the oven and stone are preheating.


Carefully lift the parchment paper with the risen loaf and place it onto the stone in the oven. Bake for about 40-45 minutes; if bottom is soft, bake for 10 more minutes. Remove from oven and let cool 30 to 60 minutes before cutting into it. The bread will be very gummy hot out of the oven.

 

 

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