The Fresh Loaf

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Bread1965

I came across this recipe a few weeks back. It talks about making a 40% hydrated starter to be left neglected for a few weeks while acid builds up and yeast permeates the starter. Later that "seed sourdough" is used as part of the bread recipe. I decided to give it a try.  I made the "seed starter" three weeks ago and left it in a cool room @ at about 55F degrees. I then followed the recipe as outlined.

The crust is delicate, not too crisp but almost shatters as you cut into it; it also has a bit of a chew to it. The aroma is subtle but fragrant. The crumb is very soft and almost lacey in texture and has a "milky" quality in it's taste as well.  It's a very nice bread and I'll play with this some more. I also thought this could be good way to use left over starter - to feed it to a 40% hydration and leave it for a few weeks to be added to future bakes.

The one thing that was VERY strange was that the dough skin during bulk tore with light coil folds. It was as if the structure was too weak to handle it's own weight. I'd fold it and then come back in 30 minutes to fold again but find a tear on the skin. And as bulk went on the skin would tear while doing subsequent folding. It wasn't completely falling apart, but definitely struggled. I thought perhaps to add a few percent of gluten flour to help next time I try this. It didn't proof and expand very much - maybe by 25% - I think because the structure wasn't fully there.  I think "why?" has to do with the acid overload that the seed starter is providing. I know I've read the link between gluten development, starch, the development of enzyme alpha amylase and acid but don't remember how the connection all works. If someone comes across this post and knows what's going on in this bread please share - thank you!

I'd encourage you to try this. There's something special going on with this bread.  The French salted butter helped! :)

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Bread1965

I made Maurizio's waffles with some discard this morning.  You'll find his recipe here. The modification was to use a blend of 50% whole buckwheat flour and 50% unbleached bread flour in place of the 250g of all-purpose. Otherwise it was pretty much the same.  I had been accumulating starter from feedings this past week in a glass jar in the fridge. I didn't weigh or measure it so I assume I probably added a full cup rather than half - but it was more spent than not (ie: not active, but not totally depleted either. Using a Belgian waffle maker the recipe yielded five full rounds.

 

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Bread1965

With cold weather settling in I'm spending more time baking.  I decided to make some whole wheat bread inspired by Tartine's version. It has about 60% whole wheat, 10% whole spelt and 30% all purpose unbleached flours. It has about 83% hydration and I added 5% wheat germ. 10% levain was used and I overnight-ed the loaves in the fridge for about 15 hours. Baked at 450 for 20 lid on and 20 with lid off - great oven spring. The crust and crumb was nicely soft, have an earthy flavour to them and crisped up beautifully when lightly toasted.  I cut into them a bit early so the crumb looks a bit shaggier than it actually is - I'm very pleased with it.

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Bread1965

Hi Everyone.. we're going to see a friend for dinner this weekend and I'm going to bring dessert. But it's complicated.. I need to bring something that is vegan, gluten free, has no dairy, peas, corn or wheat.. I could pass and bring a salad but figured that someone on the board has an idea..  I thought I could make a toffu based cream cheese pie and make a non-gluten free graham cracker crust, but any other ideas?  I've never done that before an am not sure how good the toffu cream cheese would taste.. Thanks.. frank!

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Bread1965

After a long absence it was time to get back to baking.  My starter stoically withstood the deep chill of neglect in my fridge and as is always a surprise to me came back to life with great vigour after a few feedings.  I liked the look of Tartine's Danish Rye and gave it a try. Dark seeded rye breads have always intrigued me. The recipe called for sprouted rye kernels but my lack of good timing and impatience had me use them just after a single night's full soak rather than fully sprouted. The other difference from the recipe was that  it calls for buttermilk and dark ale, and I replaced the buttermilk with more dark ale - I used Guinness.  I also had a hard time finding a dark malt syrup at the grocery store and ended up going to a home beer making supply store and bought some there. I baked them this morning and cut into them tonight. Wow.

All wet ingredients..

A bowl full of seeds..

When combined it was pretty wet and liquid. Within an hour it began to "set" as the seeds started to absorb the liquid. The recipe calls for several stretch and folds. That's not possible with this dough as it's too wet. And as we're not after gluten development I think it was more just to help all the liquid get absorbed.

Over three hours I mixed the dough three times and kept the dough warm in a proof box at 83 degrees. Then they went into the pans for another hour at 73 degrees. I then covered them with a dish town and placed them in the fridge for the night.

In the morning I baked them for about 1 hour and 45 minutes to get the loaves to an internal temp of 208 degrees.

In the picture above you can see the loaf top looks a bit pale. As called for in the recipe I brushed the loaves with a bit of water before placing them in the oven - maybe I didn't brush them enough? I'm not sure how to fix that.

I'm very happy with the bread! It's moist but not wet. It has a great firm mouth feel but isn't hard to chew.

I have two questions if anyone knows:

#1 how do I get a nicer looking top crust? and;

#2 I didn't use it but what's the purpose of using buttermilk in a recipe like this?

Thanks - frank!

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Bread1965

I've been wanting to get into dark rye seeded breads. I didn't have much time this weekend and found this recipe online and gave it a try.  https://www.occasionallyeggs.com/easy-overnight-dark-rye-bread/  I looked at Stanley's (Rye Baker) recipes but they involved more time than I had available.  The recipe I used called for cocoa powder instead of a dark beer which i wasn't sure about, but without experience thought it might be work. The results are perfectly fine and the bread is nice, but has too much of a cocoa flavour and aroma too it. And if that's your thing, this is a good bread to try - but it's not for me. The recipe gives you the option to use instant yeast or starter, and of course I used starter. My bread also doesn't look as dark as the one posted with the recipe - maybe they used a darker cocoa powder than I did.  Next time I'll try one of Stanley's recipes.

 

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Bread1965

There's something about oats in bread that I find compelling! Inspired by the community bake I made Maurizio's Oat Porridge bread. I followed the recipe as written other than to add 25 grams of raw honey to the dough (I just made one loaf). I baked it a bit too hot as I pre-heated the oven at 550 and didn't catch it until 10 minutes into the bake. That said, while the crust was a bit darker than I'd like, overall it turned out well. I tried to load it into the basket with seam side down (to bake on the top) but it was a bit too floppy for me to load the basket keeping the dough skin tight.  I baked it after 10 hours as it was pretty ripe when I woke up. The crumb is moist, firm, fluffy and has a creaminess to it. this is a very nice bread! frank!

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Bread1965

I keep making much to much starter and my fridge has been littered with glasses and jars of left over starter. I had one left to use up and this is what came out.  I had 100 grams of starter that hadn't been fed in a week and no plan. It kind of all worked out. I fed it 1:1:1 and then added another 600 g of water and 800g of unbleached bread flour as that's all I have in the house right now. Based on last week's bake and the impact oat bran had on creating a soft crumb I decided to add some steel cut oats to this bread. I added 100 g with 70 g of very hot water to soak while I got everything ready. I then thought about all the posts I see with rice so I thought I'd use some red rice I had and cooked, cooled and then added 125 g of that too.  I was hydrating some old and too try almonds and thought why not - so they were thrown rough chopped and added too at 40 g.  Thinking of Sarah Owen's spelt honey oat bread I've made in the past I decided to also add 50 grams of local raw honey to the bread too.

All in the recipe turned out to be (inclusive of the starter) 100% bread flour, 86% water, 13% cooked red rice, 10.5% steel cut oats, 5% honey, 4.5% hydrated almonds chopped and 2.1% salt.  I started making the final dough around 5pm yesterday afternoon, used a proofer box and didn't get to shape them until about midnight - by then the dough had doubled. Ideally this was a same day bake given the amount of starter, but it was late. Into the cold until this morning - 10 hours later. They were left too long before the bake but didn't fully collapse on me. I baked them in a dutch oven that was a bit small for how much they had expanded by morning.

This was a VERY sticky dough and hard to work with - very slack because of the hydration and I didn't have time to develop much structure.  Next time I'd bake same day, work on creating more structure with folds, I'd double the almonds, reduce the hydration to about 75% and maybe increase the honey to 7.5% given the rice is a bit bitter. That said, this has a very nice firm crumb that has a great resistance when being pulled apart and a nice mouth feel. It's nicely moist, and on the edge of too moist but isn't. I'd play with this idea again at some point. I threw some flax seeds on the bottom of the baskets too.

Considering I used a week old starter without a feed build-up and no plan, I'm happy with it!

 

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Bread1965

I've commented on this in the past, but it's remarkable how much neglect a starter can go through and still be able to rise well after a few feeds. I fed my starter Friday morning, then Friday night and again Saturday morning. Admittedly I used my proofer box after the Saturday morning feed. It hadn't been fed in a few weeks. I used all the starter from the previous feeds to build up volume and had no discard. My first feed was 1:3:3 and went 12 hours, my second was the same and went for about 14 hours, my third was 1:2:3 and went for about 6 hours to a triple in volume. I ended up with about 330 grams of starter.  

While not what I intended, I ended up making a play on Forkish's FWSY Pain De Campage recipe as it calls for a high starter volume and I wanted to use up what I had made. My plans changed as I had been planing on creating a home brew American Ale beer yesterday AND make some bread and then reality set in. I was chewing off more than I could get done before dinner plans. I had no whole wheat flour in the house which compounded this. I ended up using only bread flour and to make it a bit more interesting found some left over oat bran in the pantry. For the two loaves I added 10 ounces (from a measuring cup - I should have weighted it I know) and 10 ounces (by weight) of very hot water to create a soaker while I did autolyse. I decided on 10 ounces of bran as that's all I had left in the bag. It was clumpy when wet so I it really required a lot of effort to break it down and incorporate into the dough. I did three or four folds, used a proofer at 77 degrees and by the time I was home after dinner the dough had more than doubled. The recipe called for 2 grams of dry yeast which I added to help the rise given the bran.

I baked this morning - so about 12 hours later - and clearly the dough was pushing the envelope of fermentation time. I baked in a combo cooker and achieved only a very slight rise. But this has to be the softest crumb I've ever baked. It's moist, lovely and flavourful. Every time I use anything bran in a recipe I'm more of a fan of it's impact on the crumb! I coated it in dark flax seeds.

 

 

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Bread1965

It's been a long last year and my starter - Charlie - has been pretty neglected. I'm finally getting back into baking some nice bread. I didn't have any whole wheat flour in the house, so made a Tartine basic country loaf using unbleached locally milled bread flour.  I used coil folds instead of stretch and folds inspired by Trevor's technique. During bulk the structure really seemed to develop well.  I gave it a fourteen hour cold retard and baked it this morning. It had a beautiful oven spring - it easily doubled. The interior structure still doesn't look as uniform as Trevor's but I'm very happy with it. The dough was nicely moist, soft and the loaf had lots of spring as I cut it.  Being Italian I was, of course, bred on bread since 1965!  My mom inspired my love of bread.  And as it's all fresh and I'm missing her, I'm dedicating this to #mom...

 

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