The Fresh Loaf

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Degassing vs. Not degassing?

Theodough1121's picture
Theodough1121

Degassing vs. Not degassing?

Has anyone tried an experiment with two doughs, one where you degas after rising, and one where you just let it rise once? Some styles of bread like ciabatta and alot of time also sourdough, is not degassed in order to preserve the big open bubbles. On the other hand, breads like sandwich bread and burger buns are alot of the time degassed. I know that degassing will result in a more even crumb, but i was wondering whether it would have more volume as well?

I have a theory: When you degas the dough, you split all the larger bubbles into smaller ones. This means that there is less strain on every cell, and could because of that retain more gas inside the dough without overproofing? So in short: Degassing would result in an airier loaf of bread with more volume.

But that is just my theory, and i am even doubting it myself, because breads like ciabatta are most definitely airy, but i am not sure whether that comes from the fact that it is not degassed, or because of the high hydration.

 

Ming's picture
Ming

When I shape my baguettes, I press them down and roll them pretty hard, but I still get some random big wild looking crumb holes, so I am not sure if I am on board with your theory. :)

Theodough1121's picture
Theodough1121

Do you have a picture of them? I would like to see what you mean by 'big wild looking crumb holes', because i recently made a loaf where i degassed and let it rise twice, but i still got big holes because i accidentally underproofed it.

Ming's picture
Ming

Here below is one, one of my weekly 50% wholegrain baguettes. Where is yours? Let's see yours shall we. 

Theodough1121's picture
Theodough1121

First of all, sorry for the late answer. I have tried exporting the image onto my computer, but it wont work.

My crumb looked very similar to yours. To me, it looks kind of underproofed. Or maybe it isnt? What i am seeing is big and wild holes, surrounded by relatively dense crumb. Which was exactly what i had in my bread.

Ming's picture
Ming

Okay how can I fix this problem by making the holes even out like a honeycomb? 

Theodough1121's picture
Theodough1121

From what i have learned: Longer bulk fermentation leads towards a more even and honeycomb-like crumb. A shorter bulk fermentation leads towards a more irregular and wild crumb.

That said, both types still need to be proofed long enough. The one with the short bulk will of course need a longer proof in order to reach the right degree of proof before baking.

And that is what i suspect you might be doing wrong. To me, it looks underproofed. Still looks really good for a 50% whole wheat baguette!

Ming's picture
Ming

Do you have some pics to show how you fixed this problem? 

Theodough1121's picture
Theodough1121

Again, cant export images onto my computer for whatever reason. I am sorry.

But i just proofed it longer. Instead of giving it 12 hours in the fridge, i gave it 24 hours. The 12 hour one had a dense crumb with some huge gaping holes in the bread. The 24 hour one had a relatively lacy, honeycomb and really airy crumb.

Ming's picture
Ming

Talk is cheap you will need to walk the walk with some pics to show my friend. It does not work for everyone like you describe with a longer proof as I have tried every combo possible with proof times. If I had prolong proofing this particular loaf it would come up as a flat baguette instead of a round baguette. An open crumb does not correlate with proof times well, it is a standalone variable that is difficult to control. Have fun!!!

bottleny's picture
bottleny

by ChainBakers

Theodough1121's picture
Theodough1121

I guess my theory is somewhat true? The 2nd bread that was just degassed did rise a little bit higher than the first one.

But for the other ones, he also built in al ot of tension and strength into the dough, so of course they rose higher than the first 2.