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100% Whole Wheat Sourdough Hokkaido Milk Bread 2.0

Benito's picture
Benito

100% Whole Wheat Sourdough Hokkaido Milk Bread 2.0

Sorry about yet another Hokkaido milk bread, I’m still trying to improve this recipe. To do so I have increased both the tangzhong and the hydration of the dough to increase the moisture in the crumb. I’ve finally created a spreadsheet to make documenting these changes easier.

Sweet Stiff Levain

• 47g whole wheat flour   

• 21g water   

• 16g brown sugar   

• 16g sourdough starter ~100% hydration   

(1:1.31:2.9:1)  starter:water:flour:sugar

 

Tangzhong classic 1:5 ratio increased to 5% of total flour

• 115 g milk  

• 23 g Whole Wheat flour    

 

Dough Dry Ingredients 

• 8.11 g vital wheat gluten.   

      · 379 g whole wheat      

• 27 g sugar 

• 6.38 g salt  1.47%.  

 

Dough Wet Ingredients 

• 211 g milk         (Consider holding back some milk say 10 - 20g) I held back 10 g but then added 16 g so total 227g of milk was added

• 56 g egg beaten (about 1 lg egg)

• 60 g butter melted

 

Pre-bake Wash 

• 1 egg beaten

• 1 Tbsp milk

 

Post-bake Wash 

• 1 Tbsp butter (optional)

 

Total flour  465.1 g

Total dough      970 g

Liquid 29 + 210*.87(182.7) + 56*.75(40.3) + 60*.16(9.6) = 261.6

Hydration without tangzhong 56.5%

Hydration with tangzhong 376.6/463.1 = 81%

 

Instructions

Levain

Mix the levain ingredients in a jar or pyrex container with space for at least 300% growth. 

Press down with your knuckles to create a uniform surface and to push out air.

At a temperature of 76ºF, it typically takes up to 10-12 hours for this sweet stiff levain to be at peak.  For my starter I typically see 3-3.5 times increase in size at peak.  The levain will smell sweet with only a mild tang.

Tangzhong 

In a sauce pan set on medium heat, stir the milk and flour until blended. Then cook for several minutes until well thickened, stirring regularly with a spoon or heat-resistant spatula. Let cool in the pan or, for faster results, in a new bowl.  Theoretically it should reach 65ºC (149ºF) but I don’t find I need to measure the temperature as the tangzhong gelatinizes at this temperature. 

 

Dough

 In the bowl of a stand mixer, add the milk, egg, tangzhong, salt, sugar and levain.  Mix and then break up the levain into smaller pieces.  Next add the flour and vital wheat gluten.  I like to use my spatula to mix until there aren’t many dry areas.  Mix on low speed and then medium speed until moderate gluten development this may take 5-10 mins.  Next drizzle in the melted butter a little at a time.  The dough may come apart, be patient, continue to mix until it comes together before drizzling in more butter.  Once all the butter has been added and incorporated increase the speed gradually to medium.  Mix at medium until the gluten is well developed, approximately 10 mins.  You can consider resting the dough intermittently during this time  You should be able to pull a good windowpane, not quite as good as a white flour because the bran will interrupt the windowpane somewhat.

 

On the counter, shape the dough into a tight ball, cover in the bowl and ferment for 2.5-3.5 hours at 82ºF.  There may be some rise visible at this stage.

You can next place the dough into the fridge to chill the dough for about 1.5 hours, this makes rolling the dough easier to shape.  Remember, if you do so the final proof will take longer.  Alternatively, you can do a cold retard in the fridge overnight, however, you may find that this increases the tang in your bread.

 

Prepare your pans by greasing them or line with parchment paper.  

 

Lightly flour the top of the dough. Scrape the dough out onto a clean counter top and divide it into four. I like to weigh them to have equal sized lobes. Shape each tightly into a boule, allow to rest 5 mins. Using a rolling pin roll each ball out and then letterfold. Turn 90* and using a rolling pin roll each out to at least 8”. Letterfold again from the sides so you have a long narrow dough. Then using a rolling pin, roll flatter but keeping the dough relatively narrow.  The reason to do this extra letterfold is that the shorter fatter rolls when placed in the pan will not touch the sides of the pan.  This allows the swirled ends to rise during final proof, this is only done for appearance sake and is not necessary.  Next roll each into a tight roll with some tension. Arrange the rolls of dough inside your lined pan alternating the direction of the swirls. This should allow a greater rise during proof and in the oven.

 

Cover and let proof for 6-8 hours, longer time if you chilled your dough for shaping. I proof until the top of the dough comes to within 1 cm of the top edge of the pan.

 

Preheat the oven to 350F and brush the dough with the egg-milk wash.  Just prior to baking brush with the egg-milk wash again.

 

Bake the loaves for 50 minutes or until the internal temperature is at least 190ºF, rotating as needed to get even browning. Shield your loaf if it gets brown early in the baking process. After 50 mins remove the bread from the pan and bake a further 10 mins by placing the loaf directly in the oven on the rack with the oven turned down to 325ºF. You can brush the top of the loaf with butter if you wish at this point while the bread is still hot to keep the top crust soft.

Comments

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

What grain would you suggest I use for WW. ? I have some with a high protein so would I need the VWG ? I really want to try this soon. Thank you c

Benito's picture
Benito

Hi Caroline, if you have high protein whole grain, such as Yecora rojo you may not need the VWG.  The only way to find out is to give it a try and see if it is strong enough.  I look forward to seeing your bake of this.  The additional hydration actually does help with making the crumb even softer.

Benny

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

I will definitely give it a try. I have Turkey Red and an unnamed wheat I got from MN when a grower  posted about it here on TFL .  I will just give it a whirl

Benito's picture
Benito

So this updated formula I’ve increased the hydration both by increasing the tangzhong to 5% of the total flour and by increasing the milk percentage. This additional hydration does make the soft shreddable crumb even softer. I’m happy with the update. 
GaryBishop's picture
GaryBishop

How do you handle losses? Especially in the tanzhong? I scaled up by 10% and still ended up 8 grams short. 

Benito's picture
Benito

Gary, to be honest I haven’t been worrying about the loses yet.  What I think I’ll do next though is to increase the tangzhong flour to 7% and that should more than account for the loses.  Another thought I had was to make the tangzhong in the stand mixer’s bowl over a Bain-Marie.  As long as I make this the night before, it will be more than cool enough.  Actually now that I’ve written that, doing it that way would give me one less thing to wash up while making this recipe.

Benny

GaryBishop's picture
GaryBishop

Thanks. I'm making a scaled version for my tiny pan. I'm hoping the loss won't matter. I'll let you know how it goes.

GaryBishop's picture
GaryBishop

My first attempt is disappointing but thankfully it is a tiny loaf so no great loss. I had to rush things this morning because I had an appointment. 

I'll try again soon. 

Benito's picture
Benito

So did the final proof get cut short?  Sorry the first attempt didn’t work out for you Gary, I look forward to number two.

Benny

GaryBishop's picture
GaryBishop

I wasn't able to follow your process. I'll try again.

albacore's picture
albacore

And the crumb looks great too, Benny!

What was the height of this one?

 

Lance

clazar123's picture
clazar123

My SO thinks I'm weird but the pic of the loaf and then the crumb REALLY made me speechless. Absolutely GORGEOUS loaf of bread.

Thank you!

 

Benito's picture
Benito

Thank you, you’re too kind.  You could bake this as well and then your SO will be impressed.

Benny

happycat's picture
happycat

Sticking with one thing and getting the most out of it is pretty awesome. I admire the focus/dedication.

You'll be able to provide quite the tip sheet / masterclass eventually.

Benito's picture
Benito

Thank you David, I do admit to enjoying to tinker with things.

naturaleigh's picture
naturaleigh

Another gorgeous bake Benny!  And, I'm sure delicious.  You can see how light and soft the crumb is from the photos!  I'm sure you must be quite pleased with the tweaking...always so nice when it works out.

Benito's picture
Benito

Thanks so much Leigh, it is very satisfying to have things improve when you make tweaks and even better when you get to eat the fruits of those successes.  Benny

nathan_strahl@yahoo.com's picture
nathan_strahl@y...

Benito, I was referred to you as an expert on whole wheat breads.  My preference is 100% whole wheat (perhaps with some vital gluten added), but without white flour mixture.  Can you recommend books pronominally with 100% whole wheat bread recipes?

Benito's picture
Benito

Hi Nathan I am far from an expert on whole wheat breads.  I’ve recently had some success but far from an expert.  I’m not sure that I can help you with recommending whole grain cook books, although I own a few bread cook books I’m not sure that I have the best ones for 100% whole grain.  You might be better to start a thread in the forums, there are many bakers here who have read a lot of different baking books.  Tartine No. 3 I do have, and it is all about whole grains, it is fine but not sure it is the best.  Most of what I’ve figured out has been from reading in TFL and interactions with bakers on instagram rather than from cook books.

Benny