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Lemon Sugar Sourdough Rolls with Yuzu Vanilla Cream Cheese Icing

Benito's picture
Benito

Lemon Sugar Sourdough Rolls with Yuzu Vanilla Cream Cheese Icing

This recipe is an adaptation of Maurizio’s cardamon sweet roll recipe.  The dough is enriched and uses a Yudane to gelatinize some of the starches to make for a more shreddable soft crumb.  After the delicious cake I made last week using yuzu lemon I was trying to think of other ways of using lemon and yuzu and thought about sweet rolls.  So these are filled with lemon sugar and iced with a yuzu vanilla cream cheese icing.  Let’s hope this works and tastes good. 

8”x8” square pan, lined with parchment.

Total Dough Weight

1,200 grams

Sourdough starter in final dough

30.00%

Yield

Nine large rolls (baked in an 8 x 8″ square pan)

Total Dough Formula

Desired dough temperature: 76°F (24°C).

Weight

Ingredient

Baker’s Percentage

101g

Yudane: All-purpose flour (~11% protein, King Arthur Baking All-Purpose)

20.00%

106g

Yudane: Water, boiled

21.00%

404g

All-purpose flour (~11.7% protein, King Arthur Baking All-Purpose)

80.00%

136g

Butter, unsalted and at room temperature

27.00%

131g

Milk, whole

26.00%

131g

Eggs

26.00%

25g

Sugar, caster

5.00%

3g

Cardamom, ground

0.60%

10g

Salt

1.90%

152g

Sourdough starter

30.00%

1 large egg is about 50 g 

 

Need 152 g levain

Levain build overnight 

11 g + 72 g + 72 g

And prepare Yudane so it is cool and ready first thing in the morning.

 

Yuzu cream cheese icing

CREAM CHEESE ICING

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature 226 g 
  • 4 tablespoons softened butter, at room temperature
  • 1/2-1 cup powdered sugar - more if too thin, less if too thick
  • 3 tablespoons Yuzu tea (will need to taste)
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

 

 In a large bowl using a hand-held mixer or stand mixer fitted with a whisk or paddle attachment, beat the butter on medium speed until creamy, about 2 minutes. Add the cream cheese and beat until completely smooth and combined. Add confectioners’ sugar, yuzu tea, and vanilla extract with the mixer running on low. Increase to high speed and beat for 3 minutes. Add more confectioners’ sugar if frosting is too thin, more yuzu tea or lemon juice if frosting is too thick, or add a pinch of salt if frosting is too sweet. (I always add a pinch of salt!). Can top with extra lemon zest after iced.

Method

1. Pre-cook Flour (Yudane) – 8:00 a.m. or night before and cover tightly.

Be sure to make this yudane ahead of time to give it time to cool before mixing. The texture of the mixture seems to improve if left to rest for at least one hour.

 Do ahead:  Alternatively, you could make the yudane the night before, let it cool, then cover and place it in the fridge. The next morning, let it warm to room temperature before mixing it into your dough.

 

Weight

Ingredient

101g

All-purpose flour

106g

Water

Yudane

Boil the water and pour it over the flour in a small heat-proof mixing bowl. Stir with spatula (not a whisk as the Yudane will get stuck in the tines) until the mixture tightens up and all dry bits are incorporated. Let the pre-gelatinized flour cool on the counter until you mix the main dough. 

 

2. Mix – 7:00 a.m.

Because I used a KitchenAid stand mixer to quickly and efficiently mix, and because I'm not looking for added extensibility, I decided against using an autolyse for this enriched dough.

Weight

Ingredient

200g

Yudane (from above)

404g

All-purpose flour

136g

Butter, unsalted and at room temperature

131g

Milk, whole

131g

Eggs

25g

Sugar, caster

3g

Cardamom, ground

10g

Salt

152g

Sourdough starter

Add some lemon juice 1.5% = 8.7 g 

 

Mix room temperature softened butter 136 g with 136 g of flour, set aside.

Mix 136 g of eggs, 25 g of sugar , levain, Yudane, cardamon and 131 g milk with 268 g flour and

mix until the dough is fairly well developed and clumps around the dough hook.  You should almost be able to do a windowpane.  Then add the butter/flour mixture  gradually to the dough in the stand mixer waiting until the previous addition is fully absorbed.  Pre-mixing the butter with flour makes the butter easier to incorporate.

The dough should be strong and smooth at the end of mixing.  

 

Transfer your dough to a bulk fermentation container and cover.

3. Bulk Fermentation – 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

At warm room temperature, around 76°F (24°C), bulk should take about 3 hours. If your kitchen is cooler, place the pan to rise in a small dough proofer, or extend bulk fermentation as necessary.

Give this dough three sets of stretch and folds during bulk fermentation at 30-minute intervals. The first set starts after 30 minutes from the start of bulk fermentation. For each set, wet your hands, grab one side and stretch it up and over the dough to the other side. Rotate the bowl 180° and perform another stretch and fold (this forms a long rectangle in the bowl). Then, rotate the bowl 90° and do another stretch and fold. Finally, turn the bowl 180° and do one last stretch and fold. You should have the dough neatly folded up in the bowl.

After the third set, let the dough rest, covered, for the remainder of bulk fermentation.

 

4. Chill Dough – 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

At this point, your dough should have risen in your bulk container, be puffy to the touch, and have smoothed out. If the dough still feels dense and tight, give it another 15 minutes and check again.

Place your covered bulk fermentation container in the refrigerator for at least one hour to fully chill the dough.

 

5. Roll and Shape – 11:30 a.m.

Before removing your dough from the refrigerator, make the filling. In a small mixing bowl, combine the following. It may seem like it's not enough filling to cover the entire surface of the dough—spread it thin.

Lemon Sugar Filling 

2 tablespoons lemon zest

¾ cup sugar 

To make the filling. In a small bowl, combine the sugar and the 2 tablespoons lemon zest. 

Make this filling when your dough is chilling in the fridge. 

Melt 30 g of butter.

Be sure to give it enough time to let the melted butter slightly cool.

 

The dough should be cold and firm to the touch; give it more time to chill if necessary.

Next, butter your baking pan (even if it’s nonstick) to ensure the rolls remove cleanly after baking or line with parchment paper.

This dough is very soft. Act quickly to roll, spread the filling, and cut before the dough warms and softens further. If it begins to soften, place it in the fridge to firm.

 

Remove your bulk fermentation container from the fridge, lightly flour your work surface in a large rectangle shape, and the top of the dough in the bowl. Then, gently scrape out the dough to the center of your floured rectangle. Lightly dust the top of the dough with flour, and using a rolling pin, roll the dough out to a 15″ x 15″ square.

Brush the top of the dough with the melted butter, then sprinkle the lemon sugar on evenly as in the photo above.  It may look and feel like not enough filling, but there's plenty when the dough is rolled up.

 

Starting at one of the long sides of the rectangle in front of you, begin rolling up the dough as you move across. Be sure to tightly roll the dough by gently tugging on the dough as you roll.

Once finished rolling up the dough, divide it into nine 1 1/2″ pieces using a sharp knife. Transfer the pieces to the prepared baking pan and cover with a large, reusable bag.

 

6. Cold Proof – 2:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. (Overnight) As you can see above, the nine cut pieces are placed into the square pan, ready for their overnight proof in the refrigerator. Also noticeable is how soft the dough is—it's ok if they're not neatly placed into the pan. As they rise, they'll fill the nooks and crannies.

Place the covered pan into the refrigerator and proof overnight.

7. Warm Proof – 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. (next morning)

In the morning, take the pan out of the refrigerator about three to four hours before you want to bake the rolls, depending on the temperature in your kitchen.

Be sure to start preheating your oven about 30 minutes before you feel the rolls will be fully proofed. For me, the final warm proof time was about 3 hours in my 77°F (25°C) proofer, so I started preheating around 9:30 a.m.

8. Bake – 10:00 a.m.

Preheat your oven, with a rack in the middle, to 400°F (200°C). After the warm proof, uncover your dough and gently press the tops of a few rolls. As you can see above, the fully proofed cardamom rolls will look very soft. The texture of the dough will be almost like a whipped mousse. Be sure to give them extra time in warm proof if necessary. If the dough needs more time to proof, cover the pan and give the dough another 15 to 30 minutes at a warm temperature and check again.

Once your oven is preheated, remove your pan from its bag, slide it into the oven, and bake for 30 to 35 minutes.

While your rolls are baking, prepare the yuzu vanilla cream cheese icing.

 

CREAM CHEESE ICING

 

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature 226 g 
  • 4 tablespoons softened butter, at room temperature
  • 1/2-1 cup powdered sugar - more if too thin, less if too thick
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • Yuzu cream cheese icing - yuzu tea instead of lemon juice and zest

     In a large bowl using a hand-held mixer or stand mixer fitted with a whisk or paddle attachment, beat the butter on medium speed until creamy, about 2 minutes. Add the cream cheese and beat until completely smooth and combined. Add confectioners’ sugar, lemon juice, and vanilla extract with the mixer running on low. Increase to high speed and beat for 3 minutes. Add more confectioners’ sugar if frosting is too thin, more lemon juice if frosting is too thick, or add a pinch of salt if frosting is too sweet. (I always add a pinch of salt!). Can top with extra lemon zest after iced.

     

    9. Ice the rolls

    While the rolls are still slightly warm, ice the rolls with the yuzu vanilla cream cheese icing.  Optionally, you may top with either yuzu peel from the yuzu tea or lemon zest.

These are now in cold retard until tomorrow and will be baked midday.

Comments

pmccool's picture
pmccool

My wife made a lemon cake with cream cheese frosting for Easter dinner, so I’m primed to think your rolls will be delicious. 

Paul

Benito's picture
Benito

I’m crossing my fingers that my adaptations to Maurizio’s original recipe work, you just never know with these things.

Paul your wife’s lemon cake with cream cheese frosting sounds divine.

Benny

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

When covid's over I'm coming over! Wow..

Benito's picture
Benito

Well don’t say wow yet, I’m sure they’ll bake up fine but hopefully my flavor ideas will work.

Yes once the pandemic settles down and life can start to return to normal we need to meet up Frank.

Benny

justkeepswimming's picture
justkeepswimming

These look so tasty already!

A trip to a Korean market so I can try Yuzu tea &/or marmalade is on my list once I get vaccinated. While things are mostly open here (with many still wearing masks, etc.), my personal outings are still limited to a short list of locations. Soon.... 

Mary

Benito's picture
Benito

I hope you do get some yuzu tea Mary, I really love the stuff, it is such a floral take on lemon and goes well with lemon.  More importantly I hope you get your COVID-19 vaccine soon.  

Benny

slohcooker's picture
slohcooker

I eagerly read through, excited to see the results. Dang. Should've scrolled down first to see if there were results. Fingers crossed on this one. 

Benito's picture
Benito

Sorry for the build up and let down.  I had some time to write this up today so rather than write it up tomorrow I typed it up today.  I’ll bake mid morning unless I somehow sleep in which rarely happens.  

Benny

Benito's picture
Benito

I miscalculated when I cut them planning on making nine but cut 10, so one was proofed and baked in a ramekin.  I also made way too much icing, I could probably reduce to ⅓ and still have more than enough.  

justkeepswimming's picture
justkeepswimming

Nice! Was the taste what you hoped for? 

Benito's picture
Benito

Yes it was, I forgot how sweet icing is so in the future, I might try making a yuzu syrup instead to top these with Mary.

Benny