The Fresh Loaf

A Community of Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts.

courage bagel

bob_flet's picture
bob_flet

courage bagel

Hi there baking bagel community - I live in London - and have seen the craze for Courage Bagels online in LA - as a bagel enthusiast, would love to have a crack at these bagels at home. (No travelling due to the pandemic) 

Any thoughts or tips on how to recreate this bagel? they look so different and crusty / chewy 

Looks like a sourdough bread roll boiled...so Im guess high hydration and even a autolyse method...or perhaps a worked pizza dough boiled and baked? 

 

Any thoughts? comments

all the best 

 bagel_fan_21

 

 

 

 

justkeepswimming's picture
justkeepswimming

I had not heard of them before, so I read a few articles. Sounds like they specialize in Montreal style bagels. Perhaps doing a google search would get you the recipe/technique you are hoping for. (And kudos to any eatery that was able to start up and thrive during CA severe lockdowns, quite a number have not fared nearly so well.)

Good luck! 

ifs201's picture
ifs201

Bagels are generally low hydration actually. Check out the recipe on The Perfect Loaf site. 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

It takes a pandemic with the loss of tastebud sensitivity to come up with a burnt bagel that tastes good.  From California?  A state with one of the highest infectious rates?  Hmm.   I like a bold bake but this is too much burnty for me.  Seeds tend to get bitter when burned.   "Courage" Antigen test.      

Ok, kick my sweet little 'ol Lady butt now.   -Mini

Dan_In_Sydney's picture
Dan_In_Sydney

No, no - burnt seeds = bitter.

Still, perhaps better than when I tried to add some sesame seeds to a baguette and, only after I had it in the oven, did I realise that I had used the SOAP water spray bottle to wet the top of the loaf!

deuxcv's picture
deuxcv

i’m obsessed with them too. been keeping an eye on their instagram and reading articles and all i’ve gathered is the following... yes, sourdough. no wood-fire, looks like a bank of old convection ovens. honey in water. though she calls her style california-montreal, there really doesn’t seem to to be any likeness to montreal style other than honey, 🤷‍♂️. i plan on going in may or june and hopefully gather some more intel. 

bob_flet's picture
bob_flet

yes - looks like a very robust pizza dough...high H20....possibly made with a pre ferment/starter...even a ciabatta boiled....then baked...yes they look so moorish...would love to try them...

thanks 

dustyknuckles's picture
dustyknuckles

these bagels are out of this world. Shatteringly crisp with an open crumb and chewy interior. I'm hopelessly addicted and venturing across town every other week to get my fix. 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

 A bagel with an open crub?   Lol.   My dictionary is laughing.

chapguy's picture
chapguy

Has anyone tried recreating this bagel? It's unlike anything I've had. BTW, it's not much like a Montreal bagel. I wouldn't try attempting it unless you've actually tasted it. It's this unique chewy hybrid of tasting like a bagel but having with an exterior that's crisp and crackly like a baguette. 

bob_flet's picture
bob_flet

interesting yes i live abroad so i haven't managed to try these amazing looking bagels IRL - but from a lot of photos it looks like a baguette hybrid pizza dough high h20 % with natural levain....slow cold fermentation?  but how so crispy perhaps they are just cooked quite hard in a convection oven rather than a deck oven...need to have a play at home. 

have you had any luck trying to recreate? 

 

 

deuxcv's picture
deuxcv

they are boiled, as are most bagels. they are high(ish) hydration, id guess 70%. they are baked on parchment lined sheet pans in an old oldschool convection oven. they are naturally leavened. don't know how long ferment. the proofed dough portions are stored in stacking pizza doughtrays. the dough portions are opened up by coating with flour, poking a hole and gently opening up the hole before dropping in the boiling water.

 

the natural fermentation, higher hydration and boiling are what I'd guess lead to the shattering delicate outer crust. 

bob_flet's picture
bob_flet

Excellent intel i think the trick is all in the shape and tension of the fermented dough. Thank you ! 

deuxcv's picture
deuxcv

or in their case the lack of shape and tension. my observation is that these dough portions had minimal preshape and tension (unlike a portion of pizza dough ball) and were more just delicate pillowy blobs like foccacia dough. then doused in flour, a hole pinched in the middle and delicately opened, then dropped in the kettle.

 

bob_flet's picture
bob_flet

Fantastic stuff - loving this! - it would make sense poaching gentle light fluffly clouds - need to experiment and visit courage once travel restrictions are lifted.  do you think they rest a little before hit the water? or just hole and boiled? 

deuxcv's picture
deuxcv

they dough blobs were definitely rested/proofed. after the hole was formed there was no/minimal rest. cant remember for sure if it was stretch hole and immediately into water, or if they stretched out the whole tray and then plopped them in all at once, but either way, no measurable rest.

bob_flet's picture
bob_flet

zooming in on those photos looks like a ciabatta dough so high h2o .... any sweetness in the bagel? or just straight up crunchy goodness? 

deuxcv's picture
deuxcv

i'd guess 70%. maybe up to 75%. but really doubt it was in ciabatta 80% range. no perceivable sweetness or fat, but somewhere i ready they used honey in their bagels. but in bagels, the sweetener (usually malt) is in the boiling and often but not always in the dough. if in the dough, i'd guess prob not more than 2%. the most striking part was their crunch/shatter and open holes, both not typical of bagels.

and while you're in the southland, rent a car and go to folks pizza in costa mesa. probably the best pizza i've ever had, and that's coming from a pizzeria owner that makes pretty great pizza.