The Fresh Loaf

A Community of Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts.

Happy Purim!

Ilya Flyamer's picture
Ilya Flyamer

Happy Purim!

Today is the day have been waiting for: homentaschen day! I already shared my sourdough adaptation of my grandma's recipe for homentaschen (https://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/66330/grandmas-poppy-seed-roll-sourdough), and this time I actually shaped them properly. As usual, I had more dough than poppy seed filling, and turned the extra dough into mini cinnamon buns.

Cross-section:

Mini cinnamon buns:

I rolled the dough out thinner than I did previously when I made them with yeast ones, and pretty sure thinner than what my grandma does - and I quite like it! On top they get crispy, almost cookie-like, but still have a bit of softness on the bottom. The buns are very soft throughout.

Comments

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Every year I think to myself I should make hamentaschen. And every year I fail to do so. "Happy Purim Ilya". 

Nowadays there are numerous variations but in my mind the true hamentaschen has got to be the poppyseed. Very nice bake and nice to see the more traditional style. Have yourself a glass of wine, or two, with those. 

Ilya Flyamer's picture
Ilya Flyamer

Thanks Abe. We decided to postpone getting drunk to the weekend ?

I've never had them with any other filling, so the idea is strange to me! I'm sure it would be delicious too, but just wouldn't be the same thing for me.

Benito's picture
Benito

Happy Purim Ilya, your homentaschen look great, they must be a treat to eat.  Great idea turning the extra dough into cinnamon buns.

Benny

Ilya Flyamer's picture
Ilya Flyamer

Thanks Benny! Very successful batch, happy with the results. And as usual, making buns from spare dough is not my idea - my grandma always makes more dough on purpose, to make some buns :)

isand66's picture
isand66

These look awesome!  It’s been a lifetime since I had my Grandmother’s homentaschen.  Yours look and I’m sure taste amazing.

Happy Purim.

Ilya Flyamer's picture
Ilya Flyamer

Thank you! It's been a while since I had any made my grandma, living in a different country is not helping. But she was happy to share the recipe, which I adapted to sourdough, and the results are a good substitute for hers. I'm very happy with the outcome this time, very tasty indeed.

JonJ's picture
JonJ

They look superb. I have a love-hate with the mon filling (poppy seed), detested the taste in childhood and yet when I see yours they look incredible and I'm drooling.

My mother now uses her scone dough for making homentaschen (the one with fizzy lemonade in it). Should you feel like scones instead of cinnamon buns next year!

Ilya Flyamer's picture
Ilya Flyamer

Thanks Jon! I really like poppy seeds in general - I think because I associate them with homentaschen with mon filling which I love :)

Wow scone dough with fizzy lemonade? That sounds interesting! And so it makes more of a cookie-like homentaschen then? I have a whole book with scone recipes, and haven't seen one with lemonade!

JonJ's picture
JonJ

You're right - they're more like cookies:

Scone dough hamantaschen

Dough is: 3 cups flour, 1/2 cup sugar, 5 tsp baking powder, pinch salt, 3/4 cup margerine (for parev reasons, otherwise use butter), 1 egg, 1 cup lemonade

Ilya Flyamer's picture
Ilya Flyamer

That looks good, thanks for sharing!

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Is this the same as lemon-lime soda? Like 7-Up? Lemon pop? Carbonated lemon drink?.......So many different names in different parts of the world.  But the bottom line is that the lemon drink is lemon flavored, is carbonated and has sugar in it....right?

Mozoltov to all! Thank you for a yummy looking post!

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

7-up would be considered lemonade. Sweetened carbonated water with a little flavouring. Totally different to a lemonade that is still, with real lemons and often cloudy. 

Chuiry's picture
Chuiry

Oh, my! I have been looking for a yeast Hamantashen recipe for years. My Grandma made 2 kinds of Hamantashen-prune and mohn. But she did not use a cookie dough, she always used a yeast dough. When I would sneak a prune Hamantash fresh out of the oven, she would admonish me that the yeast would continue to grow in my stomach. I nearly fainted when I saw your photo. I do not yet do sourdough, so I wonder if you would be able to post your grandmother's original recipe before you revised it to a sourdough-based recipe?

Ilya Flyamer's picture
Ilya Flyamer

That's a lovely story! I didn't even know that non-yeasted homentaschen existed until I saw that all the recipes online are for some cookie-style versions. Here is the formula for the original recipe with yeast (this will make quite a lot of dough, you can just scale it down): https://fgbc.dk/1cog

Note that it's for fresh yeast, so for dry yeast normally I think it's supposed to be 1/3 of that by weight (or just check what the label says). Also, I converted some volume measurements to grams (e.g. sugar - half cup, salt - teaspoon, oil - 2 tablespoons). And most importantly, amount of flour is approximate and it's the amount I use with plain flour I have for the sourdough version. So I would add perhaps 100g less and then add little by little until it feels good. The recipe says to add flour until the dough holds its shape and it's not sticky, but it's still soft. I find this dough is very pleasant to work with, soft and supple, but not sticky and easy to shape.

With yeast, the procedure is as follows.

Bloom the yeast in a little water or milk with a teaspoon of sugar and flour. Combine milk, butter, oil, sugar and a salt in a sauce pan, and heat up until butter and sugar dissolve. Making sure the liquid is not too hot, combine with the yeast and mix. Then start adding the flour, until "the dough can hold its shape, but still soft", which was the specified in the formula amount for me. Then let it double, and punch down, and repeat that a couple of times (the more doubling/punching, the more flavourful the dough will be). Then shape (make balls of dough, then roll into a circle, put the filling on top, and pinch the sides to make a triangle), do an egg wash, and bake at 200°C without convection until the right colour.

I hope this is helpful! Please share the results if you bake them :)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

https://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/18112/nybakersnorm039s-book-recipe-tests#comment-120236

A bunch of us did some test recipes a while back.  I like the prune fillng with lemon peel that I tested.  

Ilya Flyamer's picture
Ilya Flyamer

That looks like a fun group activity! I'd join something like this if it was now.

And your hamantaschen look good! What kind of dough was that? I've never tried the prune filling, all I know is the poppy seed one from my grandma (I think she actually got the filling recipe from a jewish cook book, not a family recipe, unlike the dough), but I'm sure it's delicious as well.