The Fresh Loaf

A Community of Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts.

Powdered Honey for Bread Dough

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Powdered Honey for Bread Dough

Does anyone have experience using honey powder in place of liquid honey or other sweeteners in bread dough?

Are there benefits to using honey powder in sourdough bread doughs?

Thanks in Advance,
Danny

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

Hi Dan.. I'm a hobby beekeeper. Honey has about 18% water/moisture content. Honey powder would/should just be dried out honey that's been ground into a powder. I would be skeptical about what's in it unless I did it myself. But then again what's the point? Adulterated honey is a real problem. If you haven't watched it yet there's an episode about fake honey on Netflix in a show called Rotten. Unless you have it on hand for some reason I'd rather buy a jar from a local beekeeper. No better way IMHO. Let us know..

 

Benito's picture
Benito

That’s really cool Frank, how many hives are you keeping?  I thought you lived in Toronto but perhaps you’re outside of the city?

I have a friend who moved out of town to the countryside east of Toronto about1.75 years ago and he has two hives.  I have a bottle of his hives’ honey but haven’t yet dipped into it yet.  The current bottle is from a beekeeper friend of his.  These wildflower honeys are delicious and so much better than what you can buy at the supermarket.

Dan I hadn’t even heard of powdered honey before.

Benny

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

I've had urban hives on a rooftop in the city and on fields in the country. You'd be surprised how many hives are in the city and probably not that far from wherever you live downtown. I'm a member of the UTBA - Urban Toronto Beekeepers Association that's testament to that. I now have my hives on a friends property just north of the city. I'll have between 2 and 4 of my own hives depending on how they get through the winter, etc. I lost two hives this past summer so two are going through the winter right now. It'll be easy to quickly split them into 4 in the spring. The issue is really keeping a lid on it. It's easy to go from 2 to 12 given how prolific the queens are in a good summer. As to your friends honey - get in there. There is nothing better than local raw honey!  The taste is remarkable. And varies subject to what the bees are feeding on in their local area.

 

herbsdimples's picture
herbsdimples

Hello all,

I wish I could actually be more useful by offering an answer to Danny's question, but since I just recently purchased some honey powder from The Silk Road Spice Merchant in Calgary, I wanted to jump in and maybe find out more myself.  I seem to be a collector!

I'd also never heard of it until I started browsing their website, so my curiosity got the better of me and decided I needed some.  They describe it as a natural honey powder (ingredients listed as sugar and honey) and suggest using it "as a replacement for granulated sugar in marinades, glazes, dressings, sauces or just in your cup of tea.  It's particularly well-suited to spice mixes, dry rubs and as a powdered garnish on baking."

Cheers,

Ingrid

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Just this morning I mixed a Chocolate Sourdough using JR’s formula. 2 changes were made. The salt was lowered to 1.8% and 3% powdered honey was added. The chocolate paste was super bitter so hopefully the honey will over-ride some of that. Didn’t want bitter bread, but also didn’t want very sweet bread. We'll see... 

Using powdered honey is a first for me. The powdered honey was a bit nicer to work with than the liquid honey, IMO.

Danny