The Fresh Loaf

A Community of Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts.

Tiramisu

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Tiramisu

I take much pleasure in making various desserts even though I don't really have a sweet-tooth. IMO there are several technical aspects that one should pay attention to when making a good tiramisu. However, I would normally approach this with a chef’s instinct, rather than being a stickler for precise quantities of ingredients. That being the case I have arrived at a definitive record of how I make tiramisu.

The important principles of tiramisu:

  • It should use only mascarpone. Some recipes use whipped cream to bulk it out, but this mutes the flavour of the mascarpone.
  • It should use raw eggs. I understand some may be uncomfortable with this but they are essential in providing the right texture.
  • It should use cocoa powder for the topping, and this is best applied before serving.

Ingredients:

Crema di mascarpone:

  • 500g mascarpone
  • 100-120g sugar (to taste)
  • 4 large eggs (UK large eggs)
  • 3 tablespoons Marsala wine

Sponge layer:

  • approx. 40 Savoiardi (Ladyfinger) biscuits
  • 6-8 strong espresso shots
  • sugar and Kahlúa to taste

Prepare the espresso in advance, add Kahlúa and a little sugar and enough water to make approx. 400ml 320ml*. Set aside. Next make the crema di mascarpone which will require an electric mixer many bowls and at least one spatula. First carefully separate the eggs into yolks in one bowl and whites in another. At this stage add a small pinch of salt to the whites.

Next make a cold zabaglione (sabayon) - Mix egg yolks, sugar and Marsala wine and use an electric mixer with a whisk attachment to beat on a medium to high speed until very thick. This will take at least ten minutes - stop at intervals to scrape down the sides of the bowl to ensure a homogenous mix. The prolonged mixing time will ensure the sugar has dissolved and wine is fully emulsified. Transfer the mixture into another bowl and set to one side.

Next remove mascarpone from the fridge, empty into a large bowl (this will occupy the final mixture) and work it a little just to loosen it. Separately, using an electric mixer and the whisk attachment whip the egg-whites until "stiff peaks". This is another crucial stage; while the whites at "soft peaks" still look foamy at the "stiff peak" stage the whites will look smoother. A good sign is the whisk will leave a trailing mark in whites and the top sides will taper in. Don't over mix as the water within the egg whites will leech out. It is equally important that they are not under worked either as we need a strong structure that stiff-peak egg whites will provide.

Lastly for the crema di mascarpone; the sabayon, whipped egg whites and mascarpone are carefully folded together. There are varying ways to do this but generally it is easiest to mix-down, i.e., start with the stiffest mixture and loosen it. To do this add part of the sabayon to the mascarpone and mix until homogenous. Then add the remaining sabayon in stages folding carefully to retain as much air as possible. It should feel loose and aerated. Next add the whites, again in stages being careful to fold them in gently to avoid knocking out any air but ensuring there are no unmixed parts. This gets easier with practice.

Finally construct the tiramisu - Briefly submerge the ladyfinger biscuits in the cooled coffee mixture and layer them. Alternate with the crema di mascarpone and smooth the top with a palate knife or spoon. Cover with plastic film or foil and leave to set overnight in the fridge - at least 8 hours.

Cut pieces and dust with cocoa powder to serve.

Done!

*Updated based on feedback.

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

You make a fantastic looking tiramisu but don't have a sweet tooth. I do have a sweet tooth and craving some of that tiramisu. I think we can find a compromise that suits us both. 

Lovely indeed! 

P.s. no need to cut into pieces. That's one serving. 

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Haha, thanks Abe.

My tiramisu has gained a reputation and has been commissioned on several occasions.

This one has sadly vanished...

Benito's picture
Benito

That is one fine tiramisu Michael, I’d love a piece of that right now.

Benny

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Thanks Benny.

Unsurprisingly it has all been consumed!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

That is my favorite dessert. Seeing yours makes me think about mixing one up.

If anyone reading this post has never tasted Tiramisu, do yourself a flavor and give it a try. I doubt you’ll regret it.

The Italians know great food. Eggplant Parmesan and Tiramisu are at the top of my list...

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Italians certainly do know how to make the most delicious food! Good to know it's your favourite.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

You got me so jazzed up, I just ordered some Valrhona and Callebaut chocolate for the Tiramisu and also hot chocolate.

I can still recall my daddy saying, “boy, you’ve got champagne taste with a kool aid pocket”.

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

You've gotta make the ladyfingers from scratch Dan. 

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Valrhona, I first encountered that when working in the kitchens of The Ritz Hotel, London. Ah memories!

I particularly enjoyed working in the patisserie annex where they make all the sweets for the afternoon teas. I recall mixing up a batch of chocolate something or other and the thrill of being told to add all these bottles; 2 of Kahlua and 2 of dark rum. It was quite a moment!

Nothing wrong with seeking out the best!

Yippee's picture
Yippee

???

Must one have a machine to make espresso shots? I only have espresso powder. Is there any way I can use it to replace the shots? 

Thx

Yippee

 

P.S. How big is your glass container?

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

I would prefer actual espresso shots but making them from espresso powder would be the next best thing (although doesn't really come close). Just use enough powered and hot water per one shot. Should come with instructions on quantities. See below...

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Thanks Yippee,

Can't imagine the powder getting close to the real deal. Can you get fresh espresso from a local café? Current impositions notwithstanding... that's what I would do.

The glass dish measures (internal) 8 inches by 8 ½ at the top by 2 ½ deep. For me there was more than enough mix to fill this.

Cheers,
Michael

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Hi Michael,

I made your tiramisu again, but this time I had to leave the espresso mixture in the fridge overnight because I got caught up with something else. When the "critic" in the house took the first bite, he immediately complained that the dessert was lacking that unique, intense coffee and liquor flavor, the taste of dairy was too overwhelming, which made the tiramisu lose its characteristics and taste more like "cake".

Lesson learned: must use fresh, strong espresso mixture.

Other than the above issue, it's still very delicious. Your formula makes the perfect amount to completely fill my 12"x8" pyrex dish. And precisely, I used 24 ladyfingers and 200 ml of espresso mixture.

Thanks again for sharing this simple yet absolutely delicious formula, it is our "resident dessert" from now on.

Yippee

 

P.S. if you have any other dessert recipe as excellent as this one, please share. Thx!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I would have thought that the refrigerated espresso would have been fine. Thanks for sharing. 

Yippee's picture
Yippee

After making this recipe several times, I also realized that the amount of espresso brewed has cumulative effect on the strength of its taste in the dessert.  Therefore, even if only 4 shots are used, I usually make 8 .

The amount of espresso mixture needed depends on how loosely the biscuits are laid out.  The number of biscuits I use is between 24 and 30+. So, the amount of espresso mixture needed varies from 200 ml to 400 ml+.

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

Yippee - consider buying a moka pot like this one: https://www.amazon.ca/Jeffergarden-Portable-Stainless-Coffee-Espresso/dp/B07QYZNLNL/ref=sr_1_12?dchild=1&keywords=moka+pot&qid=1609195869&refinements=... They're relatively inexpensive and make really good espresso. They come in different sizes. And you can easily buy espresso ground coffee beans like this: https://www.amazon.ca/Lavazza-Espresso-Rossa-Brick-Coffee/dp/B0769YK4JG/ref=sr_1_5?dchild=1&keywords=espresso+coffee+beans+ground&qid=1609196016&sr=8-5  The pot will last a lifetime.. Here's how to use them properly if you're not familiar with them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpyBYuu-wJI I have at least one or two full pots every day. One bit of advice - save your brain cells and be sure to buy a stainless steel version as shown in the link above, rather than the aluminum version they use/show in the video. Enjoy.. now time for me to make some Tiramisu..

albacore's picture
albacore

You make me want to make it! I shall add it to the list.

Please could you clarify the size of the espresso shots. A fairly standard shot uses 14g of ground coffee to give 28ml of liquid. So would you say to use this amount, ie 7 shots giving 196ml? It does seem like quite a lot.

Lance

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Is 30 ml. I've just looked up how much of an espresso shot is coffee solids and it comes to 8-12%. So as an educated guess use 2.4 ml - 3.6 ml instant espresso coffee grounds and top up to 30 ml for one shot. Or 1 tsp of instant espresso coffee per shot. 

As for using actual espresso if you have a Nespresso machine it's one capsule per shot. If you've got a manual one it's 6-8g of ground coffee per shot or 15g if you are able to do two shots in one go. 

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Portafilter 4-shot line = 16g ground coffee 

Water measuring cup 4-shot line = 206g water

After filtering, espresso =190 g

Coffee ground : espresso = 1:11.9 = 8.4% 

This ratio seems to be within the range of your % calculation(am I correct?). The espresso already smells and looks like Chinese herb tea. Everyone in my family is complaining about the coffee smell/aroma. I don't think I can tolerate a stronger concentration either.

Yippee

P.S. How should I store the beans? In the freezer? Thx.

mwilson's picture
mwilson

You may have sensed the importance I placed upon the crema di mascarpone, this being where I heed the most crucial detail. Indeed, this is true but I thought it best to provide a little freedom with regard to the coffee part. Really one needs only make enough coffee liquor for the quantity of biscuits used, which can vary considerably, and for it to be to taste, with regard to coffee liqueur, sugar and espresso content.

In recalling, this is where it gets a little sketchy but in my case I used a Nespresso machine and Napoli capsules which are very strong. I made 6 espresso shots which are 40ml each from 3 capsules. Granted the second shot from each is practically piddle. I added a scant tablespoon of caster sugar and ‘glug’ of Kahlua and some water. I estimate the final liquid was circa 400ml, possibly less. I had plenty (a small glass worth) left over which went on to become an iced coffee.

So essentially, just make the coffee part as you wish...

I hope you make this,

Cheers,
Michael

albacore's picture
albacore

Thank you for your clarification Michael. I've thought about shot sizes a little more and I will add the following:

A true single espresso uses 7-8g of ground coffee to make a 14-16ml shot. However the true single espresso has all but died out (at least in the UK) and if you ask for a double shot, you are likely to get 2 x 28ml of coffeee, not the 2 x 14ml you should get.

So bearing this in mind, I plan to use 3-4 x 28ml shots, made from 42-56g of ground coffee. Of course this is mainly of relevance to those like me who are lucky enough to have a pump pressurised espresso machine, but the quantities may also be applicable to those using Moka pots.

Lance

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Because online order takes time to deliver, and I need to make the tiramisu today, I bought this and this machines today from nearby stores. I don't drink coffee, so learning to use these machines is a new challenge. Lance, could you please tell me how many grams of ground coffee and how much water I need to use, and how many times I need to repeat in the espresso machine to come up with 400 mil of espresso? 

Thanks much,

Yippee

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

What is the model number? I'm looking at instructions. 

I'm looking at the video... Wow! What a to-do! It's complicated and it looks like you'll need to do it 10x to get enough espresso. It's going to take you time to get used to it and draw the perfect espresso then repeat multiple times. 

I think because you wish to do the recipe very soon it's best to buy 10 shots of espresso and this machine will be ok for future use once you've figured out the best way to use it. 

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)
Yippee's picture
Yippee

It will cost me $20+ to buy 10 shots of espresso???

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Bit difficult to see how it works without being able to actually try it out. However...

It can make either 2 shots of espresso or 4 shots of espresso. So I guess you will need to set it up for 4 shots x 2 and 2 shots x 1. 

The instructions tell you how much coffee for 2 or 4 shots and go for finest ground coffee. 

I think you need to manually brew it and turn it off. 1 shot is roughly 36ml but 40 should be fine for what you need it for and to allow you to brew enough more easily. 

Hope this helps. 

albacore's picture
albacore

Time differences meant I couldn't reply promptly to your question. It looks like you've sussed it all all out admirably though! I'm sure it will taste delicious.

And now to make my Kahlua.....

Lance

Yippee's picture
Yippee

is plenty indeed. I'd say even half of that is enough for the recipe.

Yippee

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

6-8 espresso shots. Why did we think 10? Nevertheless I'm glad to see you figured it out and it's all coming together.

mwilson's picture
mwilson

I'm sure 400ml is enough, better enough than not. Thing is, the amount required can vary considerably. The dish size and shape will determine how many biscuits are needed and even they too can absorb different levels of coffee. Getting the coffee flavour to come through is the main thing. As per the recipe I like a good hit of coffee liqueur in the mix. Kahlua is great stuff!

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

This looks great! I'm going to make this for New Year's Eve dessert! Perfect timing.. Thanks!

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

Excellent! This is five-star restaurant stuff right there! 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Delightful and dream worthy.  I wish It was standing in my fridge right now.  Mmmmmm.  :) 

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Will and Mini, thanks for the high praise, certainly I aspire to restaurant quality standard.

semolina_man's picture
semolina_man

Great looking tiramisu!

A moka pot is a good idea for the espresso. 

Ladyfingers can be made in the traditional shape, or in a loaf form and sliced into thin layers.  Recipes and videos are available on YouTube. 

mwilson's picture
mwilson

I'm glad I shared this. Thanks to all that commented, much appreciated.

Cheers,
Michael

Yippee's picture
Yippee

do you guys use to grind the espresso beans?

Thx

Yippee

 

 

albacore's picture
albacore

I would get a pack of ready ground Yippee. A decent grinder will cost you big bucks and the cheap blade type are useless for coffee (but good for spices).

If you have Lavazza Rosso available, it's a good standard espresso blend, but I'm sure there are plenty of others.

Lance

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Yippee, I am probably replying to late to help. I assume you have already purchased you expresso supplies. I just make very strong coffee and soak the lady fingers in that. It floats my boat...

Yippee's picture
Yippee

I don't even have a coffee machine! No one drinks coffee in my family! One way or another I need to buy something to make it work ?

Another Girl's picture
Another Girl

That looks impossibly light and wonderful.

–AG

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Ah wow thanks AG!

Yippee's picture
Yippee

I licked the spoon, licked the spatula, and licked the mixing bowl! Wish I had made more!

 

 

Can't wait for our New Year's Eve dessert! Thank you for sharing! 

 

Happy New Year!

 

Yippee

mwilson's picture
mwilson

You liked it then!! ?

Thanks Yippee

? Happy New Year ??✨?

Yippee's picture
Yippee

 

 



 

Benito's picture
Benito

Oh wow Yippee, great way to celebrate the new year.  All the best in the new year to you and your family.

Benny

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

I made some for New Year's Eve. Seriously good recipe! I was tempted to skip the Khalua and Marsala wine but they truly made the dish. The only thing I did differently was to only dip the bottom half of the lady fingers in the coffee to prevent them from getting too mush by the time we ate it. It came our really well! Thanks for sharing and inspiring me to make it!

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

I had some leftover a few days later.. it was even better!! I wrote my kids an email with the recipe and process and told them to keep this one.. really great! Thank you.

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Thanks Frank. I'm really pleased you liked the recipe as much as you did and you got a great result too, well done! Great to hear you passed this one on.

Cheers,
Michael

PS. Sorry for the late reply.

albacore's picture
albacore

Mine turned out way too sloppy, but nevertheless extremely tasty and moreish.

I think the mascarpone I got was too soft (it had the consistency of Greek yoghurt) and also the (French!) savoiardi had a glazed underside which didn't absorb liquid and so I overcompensated by breaking them up so they sucked up the coffee.

Still, a very pleasant learning curve!

Lance

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

of my glass dish?  Oh, I hear my dish calling...

MichaelLily's picture
MichaelLily

We made Tiramisu for our January Taste Tester Box subscribers (we have about 130 subscribers). That amounted to 12 half sheets and I’m really hoping for some leftovers! People loved it.

I used a recipe called “the best tiramisu you will ever taste.” It was very good. It did use cream (it’s normal to cut pastry cream with whipped cream for various uses, so it didn’t strike me as off the mark), and it did cook the sabayon (it TEMPERED the eggs. The amount it changed the texture (I don’t know how much this is) is acceptable to me, plus I was unwilling to distribute a raw egg product in a scenario like this). I and my customers loved it. I ought to have quite a bit of mascarpone left, so I may have to try your recipe as I am diddling around the house for a week after coming back from South America, where the bread is very inexpensive and very average!

albacore's picture
albacore

I made Michael's Tiramisu again this weekend. My first attempt was very tasty but a bit sloppy; this one was much better. The Brescia mascarpone I used this time was far thicker (and tastier) than the Ambrosio I used last time (not recommended).

Also this time I used home made sponge fingers according to Chef Eddy's recipe for that extra touch of class!

Thank you Michael for your recipe!

 

Lance

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Hi Lance.

Sorry been a little busy and I missed your initial attempt of this.

I remember all to well having issues with setting. As I found out, in my case the issue with setting properly was with respect to the handling of the egg ingredients.

If you don't mind me saying, it still looks as if you have encountered some degree of setting issues, albeit less so.

What I discovered was the egg yolks need to be whipped for a considerable amount of time to create a stable mixture. If not beaten enough the Marsala wine will separate out. A rest period will be proof of this...

Then, next the egg whites. It can be difficult to ensure they are whipped to their optimal point. The window between over and under is very narrow indeed! But achieving this optimal point is quite crucial, as the whites provide the major backbone structure which is enveloped by the rich and unctuous mascarpone.

Still, your results look super tasty and well presented. I am glad you like this recipe!

Thanks,

Michael

albacore's picture
albacore

I have to agree, Michael - it's still not quite as structured as I would like.

A question: when you make the sabayon, do you use the K beater or whisk? And how would you describe the consistency when ready?

 

Lance

mwilson's picture
mwilson

With the whisk attachment. The resulting consistency should be very thick and very viscous but also very aerated too. I'd say the volume increase is about quadruple the initial, possibly even more. Looking into the mixer I could see a repeating cycle of large bubbles forming and bursting. Also I could see the viscosity of the mix in the trailing marks of the whisk.

As written in the above recipe:

Mix egg yolks, sugar and Marsala wine and use an electric mixer with a whisk attachment to beat on a medium to high speed until very thick. This will take at least ten minutes - stop at intervals to scrape down the sides of the bowl to ensure a homogenous mix. The prolonged mixing time will ensure the sugar has dissolved and wine is fully emulsified. Transfer the mixture into another bowl and set to one side.

Another critical point, is folding it all together. This requires a good technique to ensure as much air as possible is retained.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Hi, Michael,

I've paid much more attention to the details of your instructions and perfected my techniques in making tiramisu. I've had tiramisu for lunch in the past few days. Today I finished the last quarter of the tiramisu during lunch. Time to make more! It's truly addictive! 

As you can see, I don't even bother to scoop it out slice by slice. I'd been eating it directly from the 12"x8" pyrex dish. 

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Wow, looks spot on Yippee! 10 out of 10 ?, and what a way to lunch, good times!! ?

At least not dishing it out saves on the washing up!

I'm glad you like this so much, most appreciated!

Chuffed to bits!

Michael

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

are you letting them dry completely before using them?  

albacore's picture
albacore

Well, I guess they were "spongey". Do they need to be dry?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I've always used dried crispy lady fingers.  A very quick dunk or roll into the coffee and then after everything is together the mosture moves from the cream and coffee to the center of the fingers to moisten them. (That's what the chilling and waiting is about.)  If the "cake" is already moist from the start, there won't be any excess liquid getting soaked up.  

Another thought, dipping a moist lady finger might actually be taking on too much coffee than the dried ones.   Try it and see.  Or perhaps knock back the moisture in the coffee dip, make it more concentrated and spray it on perhaps with a mister so the fingers are not so wet.

 

albacore's picture
albacore

I've still got some ladies fingers in the freezer. Next time I'll try re-baking them at low heat before using.

 

Lance

albacore's picture
albacore

I put the thawed homemade ladies fingers in a 100C oven for 25mins before use. They were nice and crunchy without being rock hard - and no styrofoam ;)

They made an excellent tiramisu with clearly defined layers:

I forwent the cocoa powder topping because the leftovers look sad after a night in the fridge.

 

Lance

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Since Michael posted his desert in the OP, I made 3 Tiramisu. Each one tasted outstanding. The latest used gelatin in hopes of solidifying the custard a bit. Eventually, I’d like to make a free standing version similar to cakes with their exposed sides. It would be much nicer to slice. I used a packet (7 grams) of Knox gelatin, but I believe 3.5 grams would have given me a lighter texture and still been stiff enough to stand on it’s own.

I haven’t tried Mike’s recipe because I’ve made this for years with another recipe which actually uses cooked eggs. Plan to try the recipe in the OP, but will pasteurize the eggs just to be safe since they are not cooked.

Were it not for the calories, all would be eaten in short order. Yippee is correct when she says it is addicting. Will try freezing a few squares, but I am concerned about the lady finger portion to hold up well. We’ll see.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

I thought it takes160F to kill salmonella, but your sous vide link uses 135F???

Yippee

P.S. If you whip the yolks and the whites sufficiently according to Michael's instructions, the slices will free stand w/o problems, and most likely, you won't need the gelatin. My last tiramisu (the lunch) was much firmer than the first one I made. And I noticed that the properly whipped one had a more creamy/yellow color.  But I understand that not wanting to eat raw eggs is a different concern.

 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

The link is to the Anova site, so I trusted it. If you learn different please let me know. 

Thanks

Yippee's picture
Yippee

https://www.foodsafety.gov/blog/salmonella-and-eggs

https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/food-technology/bacterial-food-poisoning/#:~:text=Salmonella%20are%20destroyed%20at%20cooking,after%20use%20with%2....

I think if you use eggs that are cooked/tempered to the above temperature(s), the texture of the tiramisu will be different from Michael's version.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Yippee the many articles I’ve read about pasteurization of eggs are all over the place. I’ve read 135, 140, 150, and 160F. At 160 the eggs may begin to start cooking. Since Patsy, my wife has a compromised immune system, I may have to stick with my original recipe. It calls for heating the eggs on the stovetop with the sugar. 

Thanks for the help.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Here is the response I got from Anova. 

******** 
Safety of food is determined by both time and temperature so for sous vide, even though things are cooked at lower temps than traditional cooking methods, since they are cooked for longer, the food essentially becomes pasteurized.

There is much discussion around this topic and we encourage you to check out what others are saying in our forums for some great resources on the topic, as well as our members' opinions and concerns: 
http://community.anovaculinary.com/t/sous-vide-food-safety-or-how-to-keep-everyone-alive/281

Please let me know if you have other concerns.

Regards,

Jocelyn Damian
Anova Culinary

www.anovaculinary.com
***************


Below is an interesting and informative article pertaining to Sous Vide, times, and temperature. Although it deals with chicken breast, the information is relevant to all things Sous Vide and relating to bacteria.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/07/the-food-lab-complete-guide-to-sous-vide-chicken-breast.html

Thanks for posing your question. It lead me to a better understanding of food safety.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Is there any scientific research showing that existing Salmonella is killed by prolonged exposure (75 mins) to lower temperature(135F, per Anova sous-vide instructions to pasteurize eggs)?  Or do these conditions just prevent the bacteria from multiplying?

Is preventing the bacteria from multiplying the same as killing it?

???

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

What temperature kills off salmonella and what temperature do eggs cook? 

Turns out that 150°F and above kills off salmonella and it takes a temperature of atleast 158°F for eggs to firm. A narrow window but it can be done! 

gerhard's picture
gerhard

have to be washed, in Europe they don’t and eggs are less likely to have bacteria contamination because the protective coating provided by the hen remains intact. 

gerhard's picture
gerhard

all eggs in stores are washed and require refrigeration. I remember we were in the UK and visited Fortnum & Mason and I was surprised by the variety of different chicken breed eggs and from birds other than chickens (ducks, sea gulls are two I remember) and they weren’t refrigerated. 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I tried freezing pre-cut portions of Tiramisu and happy to report that once the desert thaws out the color, texture, and taste are excellent. This is beneficial, since most is stored in the freezer and I am not tempted to eat all of it as it taunts me sitting there in the fridge. This stuff can seduce even the most disciplined of people.

mwilson's picture
mwilson

I'm watching the video recipe.

So we're cooking the eggs, okay sure no biggie, I've taken that approach on occasion...

Wait what, we're doing custard... Why not just do a sabayon...?

Cream. Okay, here we go. Cream it up! This is the 21st century after all! I'm the dinosaur!

The electric whisk is whisking, that's "done" I say, still whisking, "stop" I shout at the screen. Still going, "stop for the love of...". "Overwhipped, yeah it's over whipped" I say. This ain't the 70s y'know!

.. applies layers of custard and over-whipped cream, "lasagne?! What is gong on!" This is madness!

Honestly this video recipe has to be the worst rendition of Tiramisu I have ever seen!

Sorry Danny.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I figured this would blow your mind <still laughing>

I am obviously not the traditionalist, but the Tiramisu I make, or what ever you want to call it, taste absolutely great to me.

I still plan to try yours, but I can’t imagine how it could possibly taste any better. We’ll see...

I remain open minded.

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Good to know my humour isn't lost on you...

Our Crumb's picture
Our Crumb

My wife and I used to like this dish so much that we named our first two German Shepherds Tira and Misu.  Great dish. Great dogs. Sadly missed. 

Tom

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Great story, Tom!

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Ah, they sound like a great duo Tom.

Sadly time always takes from us. But memories are such a powerful thing!

Thanks,
Michael

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Hi,

I bought a bag of Lavazza yesterday, but I'm not sure whether it's whole bean or ground. The texture kind of feels the same as my Starbucks espresso roast by touching it through the package(not very sure though), but it doesn't have the "whole bean" logo as the Starbucks one. (See the red circles in the picture) I hate to open it and then return it after I find out it's not whole bean. What do you think?

Also, it's intensity is 5/10. Do you think it's as strong as the Starbucks "dark roast"? (See the green circles in the picture). How do I compare the two?

Thx,

Yippee

albacore's picture
albacore

Yippee, it should be easy to feel the whole beans through the plastic in a soft pack like that. Ground coffee would feel more like a bag of white sugar.

Don't worry about the intensity - I'm currently using Illy Classico beans which say they are mild and the coffee is actually pretty strong!

 

Lance

Yippee's picture
Yippee

I pinch a piece of "grit" through the bag and then squeeze it.  It slides like a pea slipping out of its pod. I test the Starbucks one using the same method, and it slips the same.  Now I am sure the Lavazza is whole bean.  Thanks Lance.

Yippee

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Hi Michael,

If I have 680 grams (1.5 pounds) of mascarpone cheese, and I want to use it all at once to make tiramisu, can I proportionally increase the other ingredients in your recipe by 36% to achieve the taste of your original recipe? Because this is not bread, I am not sure if this is the right way. If not, how would you adjust the recipe? 

Thx,

Yippee

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Hi Yippee,

Indeed, it's not quite as simple to scale compared to a bread recipe and so you'll need to be bold and apply a chef's instinct to get this right. The sugar, flavourings and mascarpone should scale well however. The eggs might be a little trickier, I'd go for 5 eggs rather than 6 and I'd also consider 5 eggs plus one additional yolk. Like with the original recipe the sponge fingers are a separate entity and are to taste. You just need enough ladyfingers to fill your chosen dish.

Hope that helps,

Michael

Kistida's picture
Kistida

..mascarpone..I've to try making this! Thank you for sharing the recipe. :)

- Christi

mwilson's picture
mwilson

You're very welcome Christi. Sounds like you're quite enticed already.


Cheers,
Michael

Kistida's picture
Kistida

.. the ladyfingers, mascarpone (took over 16 hours), pasteurizing/tempering the yolks, whites, .. crazy? Yes. Was it worth it? Yes & No. 🤣

By the time I got to whisking the egg, sugar syrup, some cream (cos I’ve leftover) and the mascarpone, I realize how much time had passed and the cream did not get as smooth as I like thanks my chilling stuff while life got it the way. Also, I was eating each ingredient before assembling the cake. 🤤 so, next time I’ll make a ton of the cream then make other flavorful versions of this, after I go on a diet for a year. 
Thank you once again for this inspiring recipe! ☺️

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I can sure relate to tasting all the ingredients before getting the dessert made.  Often we assembled when all the women got together loosing a good portion of the ingredients.  Kudos for making your own lady fingers.

Can you imagine the lively chaos of 4 women making this with children munching on lady fingers and each sister with a spoon in the cream?   Yup, scared the men right out of the kitchen to wait for the finished product come evening. Making it was half the fun.

Mini 

albacore's picture
albacore

Looks great Kristi! I too have made my own lady fingers, but haven't gone as far as culturing my own mascarpone. I have thought about it though....

I have noticed that bought mascarpone varies a lot both in thickness and flavour. The best I've had was an organic product (forget the name).

I do think homemade fingers are a lot better than most bought ones. Bought ones are often too sweet and some (French?) are glazed on the outside bottom and sides, so don't soak up at all.

What you can do to make life easier is to bake in sheets rather than fingers. Then cut to finger size and put back in the oven on a low heat to crisp up.

Lance

Benito's picture
Benito

Wow impressive Christi, you made it all from scratch, well done you!!  I love tiramisu but all those calories at my age.

Benny