The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Can you convert diastatic rye malt to non-diastatic rye malt?

quartet1977's picture
quartet1977

Can you convert diastatic rye malt to non-diastatic rye malt?

Hi, I was just given four pounds of diastatic malted rye berries. I know a little about the differences between diastatic and non-diastatic malt, and I am definitely quite ignorant of the process that goes into creating them, but I want to experiment with both. Can I create non-diastatic malt simply by roasting some of my current supply of diastatic rye malt at a higher temperature than it was originally roasted?

Thank you so much for any tips/info/etc.!!

Abe's picture
Abe

Heating them up higher then a specific temperature will deactivate the enzymes. Just the exact procedure and how high the temperature will need further looking into or hopefully someone will chime in but it can be done. 

quartet1977's picture
quartet1977

That's what I was hoping to hear. I'll be curious to learn more details, particularly the process. Hopefully, it'll be a simple matter of scattering the malted rye berries on a baking sheet and popping them in the oven. I imagine the times and temps will vary depending on what I will use it for, but I wanted to at least confirm that a second roast would work.

Thanks again!

Abe's picture
Abe

And have been searching for some diastatic rye to turn into red rye malt. By any chance do you live in London? We could swap some. 

Red rye malt can be made from diastatic rye by rehydrating, fermenting, drying and heating. Red rye malt is non diastatic but needs to go through the other stages first. So it's possible to turn your rye into red rye malt if you wish. If you're not bothered about it being red rye malt it might be as easy as heating or it might need to be rehydrated and go through the same process skipping the fermenting.

quartet1977's picture
quartet1977

I live in Portland, Oregon. Otherwise, I'd be happy to trade, but alas.

Red rye malt is on my list of things to try, as I've been reading Stanley Ginsburg's The Rye Baker, and many of the interesting breads in their call for red rye malt. I'll look into the process that you mention. I'll likely want to experiment with it.

Thank you!

Abe's picture
Abe

...Red rye malt http://www.thefreshloaf.com/comment/433067#comment-433067

A basic outline: rehydrate, drain, warm to a certain temperature and allow to ferment for a day or two, dry and heat treat. Be careful as you don't want mouldy rye. 

quartet1977's picture
quartet1977

This is very helpful. Thank you so much!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Are you sure it is diastatic?  If it was originally roasted, it wouldn't be diastatic.

quartet1977's picture
quartet1977

Sorry, I made a mistake in describing. It's labeled diastatic. I figured it was roasted at a low temp to preserve the enzymes but maybe roasted is the wrong word. 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

“ I was just given four pounds of diastatic malted rye berries” 

If the berries have been sprouted, they are diastatic, otherwise they are not diastatic.

Search the net for the proper temp (I don’t recall), spread the berries on a baking sheet and hold at that temp for a while. They are instructions on the net and they are not difficult to do.

quartet1977's picture
quartet1977

They are diastatic according to the label. They have been sprouted. I'll experiment with roasting some of them to a darker color. I've not used sprouted or malted grains, so this is entirely new to me. I got them in a trade for some perennial wheatberries I had. Looking forward to baking with them.

Abe's picture
Abe

Non diastatic but if you wish for Red Rye Malt, which is also non diastatic, they'll have to go through a process. Basically one step back two steps forward! 

quartet1977's picture
quartet1977

I'm curious to try that. I looked at the link you posted. Lots of good info there. Thanks again. I'm also curious to try it in its current diastatic form. Fortunately, I have a fair amount to mess around with. I didn't get the malted rye with anything specific in mind, just figured it would interesting to learn about and work with.

Abe's picture
Abe

Then used 1-2 tsp in this recipe https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/our-version-of-tartine-style-bread/ and it worked a treat. Best Tartine i've ever made. So since you're new to this I say start off simple. Grind a bit into flour and use 1-2 tsp per 2lb loaf. 

quartet1977's picture
quartet1977

My plan for the diastatic was to start small as you suggest. I was thinking no more than 2% of the flour weight. But that's based on my experience with diastatic barley malt, which I put in pizza dough. Not sure how diastatic rye compares, but I'll look into that. I really appreciate all of your suggestions!

Matt