The Fresh Loaf

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Formula development: Falzonovich’s New York Deli Rye. Bake #1

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

Formula development: Falzonovich’s New York Deli Rye. Bake #1

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The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

Time was not on my side last night. I decided to forgo a late-night affair in favor of an early morning fresh start. 

10:00 AM - We are 3 1/2 hours into the four-hour room temperature sponge ferment.  

Observations. Even at the higher hydration, the actual steps are closely mirroring Ms.Beranbaums, procedure. 

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

Mixing on Bosch, speed # 1 more than half of the bassinage water was incorperated over some eight minutes. At that point, the shaggy dought was left for a fifteen-minute rest. After the rest, all but 7grams of the remaining bassinage water was incorperated. This leaves us with a 74% hydration dough. The oil was added, and the Bosch speed #2 selected. After a five-minute spin, we now have a cohesive, homogeneous workable dough ball. Let the bulk fermentation begin.

The flour mixture and sponge are combined. 

The held back, water is slowly and painstakingly incorporated.

After a fifteen-minute rest, all but 7 grams of the bassinage water is incorporated.

 

The oil is added and the gluten developed at speed #2 for five more minutes. We now have achieved a very nice looking dough ball, entering bulk ferment. 

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

Scale, divide, shape, and proof. 

Scale: Batard 600 gram/Baguette 367 gram

 

Pre-shape

Shape

Proof

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

The actual bake:

I tried to get fancy with the scoring. I forgot to spray the loaves as I wanted to. Even with the towel and the hot pan, I am very unhappy with the color. Batard should be done directly.

Holy crap! It really does smell terrific in here! My gut tells me I am going to be thrilled with the crumb. Time will tell. How do I store these bad boys till tomorrow for the best outcome?

Benito's picture
Benito

Looking good Falzon!

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

Pastrami on baguette-shaped N.Y. style rye. The bread is very tasty and pillow-soft. Dare I say, the perfect sandwich bread! 

 

Benito's picture
Benito

Great baking Will.  That is the first rye baguette that I ever recall seeing, an excellent vehicle for your pastrami sandwich!

Benny

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

At the top of the page, there is a link named videos. Hidden on the second page is a video named shaping and slashing. If you watch some of the linked videos you will notice what seems at first glance very unorthodox methods being used, such as scoring the loaves right after shaping and before proofing. Some of the comments hypothesized that it was being done for video production. Then someone mentioned It looked like these french loaves were rye. The slashing was done early to give them time to open before the oven! Interesting videos have a look-see.

Benito's picture
Benito

I can’t see a link up there Will, I must be losing my vision or something.  It is interesting that they scored their dough so early, I’ve never seen that before.

Benny

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

La coupe Chevron & Le pain polka are of special interest.

Formes de pains (free.fr)

Another Girl's picture
Another Girl

Nice looking bread! I'm kinda diggin' the unusual scoring on these loaves. And you guys are killing me with the deli meats on your deli breads! WHY DIDN'T I THINK OF THAT??? I'm going out for some corned beef, stat!

–AG

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

Please direct your attention to the attached photo. I always have a good supply of dehydrated onion on hand for use in Norm's onion rolls. The link below will take you to the play by play of bake #1, and soon the blow by blow of bake #2. Right now, I am warming up my white flour mother culture. The plan is to inoculate the 100% hydration rye starter with it, after a quick feeding.

 

The steeping of the onions is now underway. Why two separate steeping pots you ask? I beg your patience. The answer to that question and many more will become evident in good time. 

 

At the six-hour mark, the sponge was mixed with the final dough, flour onion water, sugar, and yeast. The shaggy mass was set to fermentolyse for 30 minutes. After which it took a 5-minute ride at Bosch speed #2. Now we add the onion and go another 10 minutes at Bosch #2. The sticky mess of dough is now set to rest for 10 additional minutes. 

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

I ran into more than a few issues with this bake. I first was too high a hydration. I neglected to hold back some water until the gluten was somewhat developed. I did not compensate for the water in the rehydrated onion., even with wringing them out good. Last night it became evident I was not going to be able to shape this stick mess, even with the addition of a couple of tablespoons of flour. I decided to cut my losses and scrape it out of the mixer. my hope was a cold slow ferment would make the dough more manageable. Well even refrigerated the dough doubled before I went to ben (2 hours) I punched it down and hoped for the best. This morning it seemed like the dough was already on the decline. During shaping, I did my best to redistribute some sugars without totally degassing. 7:00 AM I fired up the oven and refrigerated the now shaped dough. Monday morning payroll is due. At 8:00, something I was ready to bake. add in a few more rushing mistakes and... Somehow by hook or crook, I may have pulled this one out! 

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

A very respectable result. 

Another Girl's picture
Another Girl

That was a heroic rescue! Your write-up made me laugh. My kitchen is frequently a comedy of errors; I don't have to plan experiments, they just happen :-)

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

We have some really great, methodical, and scientifically inclined bakers in this club. Me, I am more the fly by the seat of my pants kind of hobby baker. Sometimes I plan out in my head how the bake will look. Most of the time, it turns out that... "The best-laid plans of mice and men, oftentimes go awry". I describe myself as a Roman among Greeks in this club. That is surely how I feel. (I would not have it any other way!)