The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Eric’s Poppyseed NY Deli Rye Bread

Benito's picture
Benito

Eric’s Poppyseed NY Deli Rye Bread

This is my first bake of rye at this percentage, prior to this I have only used 5-10% in my sourdough breads.  I’ve followed Eric’s original recipe but followed Dan’s procedure building the gluten before adding the levain, salt and holdout water.

 

The crust is soft after it cools and will slice better the next day. If you need bread that will stand a few days, this mix is good for mailing across the country. Sealed in a plastic bag after cooling, this rye will be great 4-5 days later and freezes very well.

 

For one loaf

 

Rye Sour

50g Active Rye starter

137.5 g Rye (Whole or White Rye)

137.5 g water

Mix and set at room temp overnight. (If this stage will longer than 8 hours I suggest refrigerating after 3 hours and warming to room temp before proceeding)

 

 

Final Dough:

All Rye Sour 163 g of rye total so 29% rye

242g water (consider holding back some water say 22 g or so) hydration 73%

394g bread flour

½  Tablespoon sugar

½  teaspoon instant yeast

11g Sea Salt

 

(Total flour 557 g)

 

Build the rye sour overnight.

 

Mix bread flour, water (minus holdout water), yeast and sugar using a mixer.  Once incorporated let rest for 15 mins.  This is a stiff dough.  Then mix on low speed to build gluten.

Once gluten well developed add levain mixing again until well incorporated and gluten well developed.  Then add the salt and holdout water gradually and again mix until well developed.

Transfer the dough to a well oiled bowl and continue bulk fermentation 80ºF for about 1 hour or until the dough has at least doubled.

Once bulk is complete and the dough has at least doubled pre-heat the oven to 500ºF with the dutch oven inside.

Dust the surface of the dough and the countertop with flour and release the dough onto the countertop.  Degas the dough by patting it down with the heel of your hand.  Shape into a batard.

Transfer the batard to your final proofing device.  I used a cookie tray with bottles of wine on either side, then my couche and then a sheet of parchment paper.  I placed the dough seem side down onto the parchment supporting the sides of the dough.  I brushed the surface with water and put poppyseeds on the outside of the dough.  

The dough was left to final proof at room temperature.

After about 45 mins when the over was ready the dough was lifted off the couche using the parchment as a sling, placed on the countertop and scored with a bread knife.  The dough was then transferred to the dutch oven and the lid placed on top for steam.

The oven temperature was dropped to 470ºF and the dough was then baked for 15 mins lid on.  Then the lid was removed and the dough was baked for a further 20 mins at 420ºF.  After 20 mins the temperature was dropped to 350ºF and the bread was done after about another 10 mins and removed to a wire rack.

A glaze of cornstarch and water was brushed on the crust.

The bread will be left until the next day to slice.

 

 

 

Comments

Ilya Flyamer's picture
Ilya Flyamer

That looks gorgeous. Looking forward to seeing your crumb, I'm sure it'll be great, and delicious.

Benito's picture
Benito

Thank you Ilya you are always so kind and encouraging.

Benny

Benito's picture
Benito

I’m quite pleased with my first bake of Eric’s Rye.  The crust wasn’t too thick and had a nice crisp crunch.  The crumb was relatively light, yet moist without being gummy at all.  It had a nice mild rye tang and I’m glad I went with the poppyseeds rather than the more common caraway seeds as they aren’t my favourite.  I think I like rye more without the caraway component.  I will keep this in my rotation of baking especially given how super fast it is to make.  I can’t believe it started a bedtime and was done early morning!

I want to thank Dan for his suggestion to fully develop the gluten before adding the rye sour.  I suspect that contributed greatly to the success of this loaf for me.

The bread is great for a sandwich and particularly good with some Eataly roast pork.

GlennM's picture
GlennM

I‘m going out to the kitchen now to refresh my starter. I’m making this tomorrow!

Benito's picture
Benito

That’s great Glenn, I hope you post how your rye turns!

isand66's picture
isand66

This looks perfect for what this type of bread should be.  

Benito's picture
Benito

Thanks Ian, I haven’t had rye bread like this in many many years so wasn’t sure how it should turn out.  I’m glad it worked out and is a good tasty bread.  Not being fond of caraway seeds I prefer the poppyseeds on this.  Looking forward to your upcoming rye bake as well on the CB.

Benny

isand66's picture
isand66

Oh my! :)  That is certainly not common on rye but I'm sure it tasted just fine!

You need to try some onions either inside or toasted dehydrated ones on top.  It's one of my favorite combos with rye.

I'm going to try and revise one of my favorites which I did in honor of Eric's passing.  This one had a combo Yeast Water and Rye starter but I'm going to combine them into one Rye starter I think and probably make a few other changes.

You can check out the original on my blog: https://mookielovesbread.wordpress.com/2012/12/10/onion-sourdough-yeast-water-onion-rye-ale-bread/

 

Benito's picture
Benito

Ian your blog website is great.  Very nice photos and detailed write ups of your baking over many many years, very impressive.  Yes the sautéed onions are a good idea for this bread, I’ll need to try that, thanks for the suggestion.

Benny

Benito's picture
Benito

I decided that bake this again, partially because it is a good bread but also because I wanted to see if pushing bulk further would reduce the splitting in the sides of the crust.  Someone posted that the splits occur if the dough is a bit underproofed.  So for this bake I pushed bulk much further maybe about 50% further, although it is hard to say because the dough temperature was low due to the proofing box being full with another dough.

The proof was definitely pushed because you can see the oven spring wasn’t as great as the first time and the bread spread somewhat in the dutch oven.  The sides didn’t split though so I do think that you can minimize that splitting by pushing bulk, but I do think I pushed it a bit too far.

I may not be able to post a crumb photo because this loaf will be gifted.

pmccool's picture
pmccool

The slashes have definitely bloomed and the overall shape suggests that there was adequate, if not massive, oven spring.  I expect the recipients will be quite happy with the loaf.

Paul

Benito's picture
Benito

Thank you Paul, yes I’m pretty sure that my friend will enjoy this bread despite the fact that it didn’t get massive over spring that I was spoiled with on the first bake.  Usually my second bakes are better than my first rather than the other way around, but again, I deviated from the recipe with bulk times.

Benny

GlennM's picture
GlennM

No exactly , I forgot to hold out the salt at the end but I got good oven spring. I added some onion flakes, fennel seed and caraway l will leave it a day before cutting it but looks good so far. I had a bakeware pan to cover it but I ended up just steaming the oven because it looked like the pan was too small 

Benito's picture
Benito

That looks really great Glenn, I hope you're happy with it when you finally get to try some.  I'll look forward to your crumb photos too.

Benny