The Fresh Loaf

A Community of Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts.

In praise of Durum flour, from Brar Mills.

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

In praise of Durum flour, from Brar Mills.

I've gone through at least 30 pounds of this Sher brand high extraction durum flour, from Brar Mills, that I've purchased from a local Patel Brothers grocery store.  It's called "Fiber Wala."  ("Wala" is the Hindi word for "the one with ..." or "suppIier" or "provider.")  I assume it's at most Indian grocery stores in North America.

It's a true flour, not a coarse semolina.  I've used it for loaf bread, but it's really best for flat breads, such as tortillas, chapatis, and thin pizza crusts.   Durum, a yellow wheat, does not make as good gluten as red or white wheat.  But, if you want a high extraction, high fiber durum for your Altamura/Pugliese bread, this is it.  The label says "whole wheat", but I don't think it is 100% whole grain.

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For those who want a more "white" flour (though this is still yellow in color), endosperm only, with a low fiber content similar to All Purpose flour, they make "Desi Style" durum.  But I have not tried it.

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

Has less fiber.

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

Has more fiber than Desi Style.

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy
idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

This is a reconstituted flour (some bran has been added back in) and is a blend. Has some fiber, but not 100% whole grain. Has enrichments (vitamins added.)
Benito's picture
Benito

So Dave, is this the one of the Golden Temple flours that is 100% durum, so similar to Semola rimacinata?

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

If you can expand the photo, it says "Durum wheat flour, durum wheat bran, and wheat flour blend."  So it's obviously a "reconstituted" type of flour, having bran added back in.  

The "and wheat flour blend" makes me think it is not  100% durum.  (I forgot to take a photo of its official ingredient list. Last I looked it had vitamin and folate enrichments.)

Golden Temple has two types of flour. Here's what Alfanso bought (his pic):

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/comment/459711#comment-459711

The label looks the same.  And he liked it.

I did try some Golden Temple many years ago as a partial ingredient in bread machine bread. It seemed okay, but that was before I was a bread snob.

The only other one I tried, say within the last 2 to 4 years, was Fiber Wala, and I distinctly remember liking it.

I'm going  to have to try the Patel brand now.

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All the above four products are true flour,  not the gritty semolina.  Though Patel does sell various semolina.

 

alfanso's picture
alfanso

down here (I'll take you there when you come down on a field trip to a few Int'l grocers, if you wish).  I baked with it once just to test it out and it was just Jim Dandy.

Benito's picture
Benito

I’m hoping that we can still come down this winter.  I’d really miss getting to Fort Lauderdale if we don’t.  Sure I’d be interested in seeing some of the international markets in Fort Lauderdale Alan, that would be great.

In the meantime, I’ll have to do a bit of research on Semola rimacinata here in Toronto.  

Thanks for starting this thread Dave, now that I’ve baked with Semola this interests me greatly.

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

Benny, you're just going to have to buy a bag of each and try them out. ?

Maybe give away half of each bag if you have storage limitations. 

We see your dining area in most of your photos. You have plenty of room! Just get a 4 shelf wardrobe style cupboard at Ikea.

Benito's picture
Benito

LOL like my partner would agree to that.  I already have overflow flour in my walk in closet in the bedroom as embarrassing as that is to admit to.

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Refers to one particular flour. I've seen the word Atta on bags of flour referring to many different types of grain.

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

Yes, atta can be interpreted to indicate (though not the literal meaning) "has at least some bran."  Atta does not necessarily mean 100% extraction either. The opposing word in India is "maida", which indicates a refined flour wih a bran content similar to our AP flour. And that is not to say it is equivalent to American AP flour -- I'm just comparing bran content.

semolina_man's picture
semolina_man

Big fan of semolina here.  I prefer semola rimacinata for its mixing and shaping performance. 

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

For a tortilla or chapati with Fiber Wala whole grain durum, from Brar Mills in Canada. See photo of the bag in a previous comment.

  • Fiber Wala Flour, 100%.
  • salt, 2%
  • spring water, 74 - 75%.
  • oil, I use grapeseed oil: 1 - 2%.

Mix flour and salt. Add water and mix well to a cohesive mass, not shaggy. Let rest at least 5 minutes. Add oil and mix again until oil is well integrated.

Let rest at least 30 minutes. 

Roll out thin. About 54 grams of dough (30 grams of flour) should give a 7 to 8.5" diameter tortilla. 2 or 3 drops of oil spread on your rolling pin will help keep the dough from sticking to it.

Cook on a heated griddle, medium-low heat, until both sides have golden brown (not dark) spots. Surface of tortilla should still be soft.

Let rest in a closed container, such as a tortillera, to cool and for moisture to equalize and further soften the surface.

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

For a tortilla or chapati with Golden Temple durum flour (atta), in the white and red bag. See photo of the bag in a previous comment.

  • Golden Temple durum flour (white/red bag), 100%.
  • salt, 2%
  • spring water, 62 - 63%.
  • oil, I use grapeseed oil: 2%.

Mix flour and salt. Add water and mix well to a cohesive mass, not shaggy. Let rest at least 5 minutes. Add oil and mix again until oil is well integrated.

Let rest at least 30 minutes.

Roll out thin. About 50 grams of dough (30 grams of flour) should give a 7 to 8.5"  diameter tortilla. 2 or 3 drops of oil spread out on your rolling pin will help keep the dough from sticking to it.

Cook on a heated griddle, medium-low heat, until both sides have golden brown (not dark) spots.  Surface of tortilla should still be soft.

Let rest in a closed container, such as a tortillera, to cool and for moisture to equalize and further soften the surface.

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

For a tortilla or chapati with Swad brand durum semolina, the gritty stuff.

Examples:

UPC (4 lb package): 0.51179.17530.3.  I paid $4.99 US at a local store.

  • Swad durum semolina, 100%.
  • salt, 2%
  • spring water, 57%.
  • oil, I use grapeseed oil: 2%.

Mix semolina and salt. Add water and mix well to a cohesive mass, not shaggy. Let rest at least 10 minutes. It takes a while for gritty semolina to absorb the water. Add oil and mix again until oil is well integrated.

Let rest at least 30 minutes.

Roll out thin. About 48.3 grams of dough ( 30 grams of flour) should give a 7 to 8.5" diameter tortilla. 2 or 3 drops of oil spread out on your rolling pin will help keep the dough from sticking to it.

Cook on a heated griddle, medium-low heat, until both sides have golden brown (not dark) spots. Surface of tortilla should still be soft.

Let rest in a closed container, such as a tortillera, to cool and for moisture to equalize and further soften the surface.