The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

seed and grain bread

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ejm's picture
ejm

seed and grain bread

seed and grain bread

Our multigrain bread recipe has a fair amount of rye flour in it. I still haven't found reasonably priced rye flour so decided to replace the rye flour with wheat flour and some corn flour. This is the great thing about bread recipes. They are pretty forgiving and substitutions can be made fairly easily.

The dough was somewhat slacker than it is when it's made with rye flour. But it still rose well. Ha. Almost a little too well.

After mixing it, I left it to rest for about an hour rather than the 20 minutes I thought I was going to leave it. It had risen considerably and only required about 5 minutes of kneading instead of the 10 to 15 I would have given it.

I did manage to shape it in time though. It was just starting to approach the top of the rising bowl - pretty much perfect amount of rising. Okay, maybe a little bit over-risen....

Too bad I saw dmsnyder's post entitled The effect of scoring on loaf shape AFTER the bread was already in the oven!

I almost didn't score it at all - it was on the verge of being over-risen (cough). I was going to score it crosswise but then decided I like the look of the length-wise score. However, if I'd known it would cause the bread to flatten, I would have gone with the crosswise slash - or herring bone. Next time....

Still, in spite of being allowed to overproof, the bread turned out beautifully! It was so pleasing that we decided to use it as cinnamon toast for dessert (after wonderful chicken and vegetable soup made from the carcass of our Thanksgiving roast chicken). When we sliced into it, the aroma was fabulous. I will definitely be making this variation again.

seed and grain bread

Comments

fredsambo's picture
fredsambo

That looks yummy! I am slowly working my way towards the more hearty style breads at home, I'll definately keep this formula! Thanks!

Jolly's picture
Jolly

Hello Egm:

 

I just got through mixing up dough for some seed bread by Rose Levy "The Bread Bible." Golden Honey Oat Bread

 

The pictures of your seed breads are awesome.

 

I had to adapt my recipe for I live at 5,000 feet. So I left out the Vital Wheat Gluten flour, that Rose said really lightens the loaves. Especially when you're adding grains and using whole wheat flour.

 

Vital Wheat Gluten Flour---I cannot use the gluten flour at this elevation for it blows up my breads like balloons. That's one ingredient I simply don't need at this elevation.

 

Plus I'm allergic to yeast. So I have to depend on sourdough to raise all my breads naturally.

 

I decided to develop (Sourdough Lady's) Wild yeast starter a while back and it's working great. So I made a firm starter using my new wild yeast and used an organic finely milled whole wheat flour where some of the bran has been removed to make the firm starter. Then I added Richard Bertinets "Slap and Knead" method to help lighten the dough.

 

Wile I was using the (Slap and Knead method) I noticed at this elevation that I only need to use it for about 3 to 5 minutes. I can actually feel the dough getting soft and elastic within minutes. 

 

Using a sourdough firm starter is well suited for baking at higher elevations. My problem is my breads rise to quick. But using a firm starter at my elevation is wonderful for a long slow rise. Just what I needed now I can see why the need for so many different starters.

 

The dough looks good and feels like it has a lot of elasticity and feels light. I'm going to let it rise overnight to develop more flavor and fold the dough a couple of times.

 

Last year I bought "Pie In The Sky" by Susan G. Purdy so I could learn how to bake at a higher elevation. With all the adaptions I've learned from Susan I sure hope the bread turns out great.

 

Looking at your pictures of the seed breads has really been encouraging. So my version of a seed bread recipe will be a mild sweet sourdough version containing no yeast or vital wheat gluten.

 

Jolly

 

 

 

 

 

ejm's picture
ejm


Thank you for your kind words, Fred and Jolly. It is really good bread. So good that I'll be making it again tomorrow.

I have zero experience with baking at high altitudes so I'll be interested to hear how this turns out for you, Jolly.

-Elizabeth 

ejm's picture
ejm

I made the bread again last night (sorry no photos), put flax seeds AND sesame seeds on the outside and slashed it in a herringbone pattern. This was an attempt to get the bread to rise upwards rather than outwards. No such luck - it spread outward in pretty much the same fashion as when it was slashed lengthwise. The herringbone pattern looks nice though.

-Elizabeth

seed and grain bread recipe