The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Wax and the kneading bowl

  • Pin It
micki's picture
micki

Wax and the kneading bowl

I need info on carnauba wax to apply to a kneading bowl.  I'm not asking any questions except what store to head to and a specific product name? 

Still keeping my head lowered since I found out about mineral oil but since I haven't heard back from anyone (and you guys have a great sense of humor), I figure no one has heard my tale ( . . . or you're thinking about a total ditz!).  I'm still stumbling through the threads.  Don't know how finding that old kneading bowl and the discussion ended up under "Images".

This baby was extremely thirsty for the oil but about ready for the final coat.  I remember hearing about carnauba wax for cars but I also know it is used for makeup and in the kitchen.  HELP!!  Mic

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Micki,

Unless you are looking for a very high-gloss finish, which is what the carnauba wax will give you, I'd stick to the mineral oil.

I just "renewed" a maple cutting board this morning that had been salvaged from a commercial kitchen.  It's been sanded and steel wooled, then washed with bleach and soap, and is presently air drying.  Tomorrow I will apply a couple of coats of mineral oil.  Which reminds me, I need to oil a couple of other cutting boards and my knife handles, too, while I'm at it.

Paul

micki's picture
micki

Paul, thanks much.  Didn't realize I could just proceed without having a wax finish.  Makes sense.

Darn you, this is the weekend and I'm supposed to be lazy.  I've got a set of Chicago handles that could really use some oil.  Micki

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Micki.

I'm going to take you at your word and not try to convince you that you really want mineral oil.

Besides its use in car wax, canauba wax is also used to polish briar pipes. If there is a good smoke shop near you (one that sells fine pipes and pipe tobacco), you might ask them to sell you a bit, if they keep it around.

Here is a source Google found for a product made for wood polishing:

http://www.realmilkpaint.com/carnauba.html

Here's a source or Carnauba wax for briar pipes:

http://www.jhlowe.com/finishing.htm


David

micki's picture
micki

David, thanks for your help.  Got the word on mineral oil and carnauba wax from 'emh'.  It's "six of one and half a dozen of another" as to how folks view this stuff.  I'd seen that carnauba was used on pipes.  Just hadn't finished the thought process to check with a tobacco shop.  Micki

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Please buy only food grade. Heated and lightly coated on salt for pretzels is one example. I don't know where you would find it. Might require melting, brushing, and some extra equipment, be prepared.

Food grade mineral oil can be used for a myriad of things as you found out. It doesn't take much (that's why the raised eyebrows) and when I need a lot of unscented natural oil wipes, I take a box of unscented tissues and pour a few tablespoons of mineral oil on them (in a proper container of course) and give them a day to soak it up. Then use them on behinds, wooden furniture, cutting boards, knives, paneling, oil painted fingers, or sap from the pine tree. Nothing cleans an oiled surface better than oil. After cleaning and allowing the rubbed on oil to soak in buff with a clean dry cloth to remove excess. This is not a hurried process the first time. Allow the wood to just take its time. No other topping or finishing surface needed.

Another reason to go with just oil is that wax when added over the oiled surface, may not bond well to the bowl and only flake off sooner. Oil sinks into the 3D cell structure of the wood filling and in hollows preserving it. If one were to put just a drop of oil onto dry wood and watch it, over time one sees it change as it absorbs and runs with the grain. Where there was a drop, there is now a long line with the width of the drop. A little goes a long way.

On another subject: Everytime I post a picture, one picture always ends up in "images." If I erase it, I erase also the photo in my posting. Lovely bowl you have there. Got another picture now that it's cleaned up?

Mini O

micki's picture
micki

Thank you also for your help.  The pic you saw was from Hullaf and she does have a beautiful bowl.  I haven't got mine posted yet.  Do have the before and after looks.  I'm thrilled with the appearance.  Now 'knead' to find out how it works.  We're not sure if it ever was used for making bread. 

We were doing some clearing of a storage room that had been 'added to' for the past 20 years.  Boxes from husband's mom's house held some great treasures - this bowl among them.  I've done LOTS of cleaning, scrubbing and soaking on it.

Please continue reading to hear my tale on mineral oil.  This site is an addiction!  Can't wait to get back and read more.  Micki

micki's picture
micki

Okay you guys, here's the deal.  Put down the coffee cups.  I don't want your screens to get wet as you choke on a swallow when you start laughing your 'buns' off at me.

 Had several people suggest mineral oil to get my kneading bowl back in shape and some were very concerned that I use only "food grade".  Sent my husband to our local druggist with the request.  They had no idea what he was talking about.  I went to a large K-Mart, checked their kitchen area, then asked 3 druggists for food grade mineral oil.  They suggested I check a grocery store.  Went down the road to the health food store - also a blank, don't-have-a-clue look.  At the grocery store, I go down the "aspirin" aisle.  There's a bottle of mineral oil next to some brand name laxatives.  Pick it up and read the label.  "Laxative Lubricant - Odorless/Tasteless"

As a teenager in the 60's, I'd add a couple drops of iodine to a bottle of baby or mineral oil, shake well and slather my body for tanning purposes.  (Mineral oil was heavier than baby oil and stayed on better.)  The ONLY thing I ever knew about this stuff was equated with baby oil uses - lubricants.  If I had another problem, mom used prunes.  I swear I didn't know about this other use.

Now if you can swallow this stuff as a laxative, doesn't that make it "food grade"?  Why wouldn't a druggist understand that?  Food grade and laxative don't fit in the same thought process?  If there is something I'm missing, PLEASE fill me in.

I'm fixin' to make a batch of bread tomorrow.  Hope to be using my well oiled, not waxed, old kneading bowl.  Hope you're laughing with me more than at me.  Mic

efm411's picture
efm411

Google Mineral oil and check out several sites.

Here is an excerpt from one:

USP-grade mineral oil is a popular choice as it is the cheapest pure food-grade oil you can buy (do not use vegetable or olive oils because they can turn rancid). Mineral oil remains safe throughout its life. There are various oils available for cutting boards and butcher blocks. Some are called "Butcher Block Finishes" or "Mystery Oil." Save some money by visiting the local hardware or drug store and purchasing Mineral Oil. (not mineral spirits - this is paint thinner). 

When you see the words "food safe finish" in a description of a wood product, this generally means mineral oil has been used. Simply wipe mineral oil on the surface of your board and watch it soak in. When the wood won't take any more oil, you can wipe off the excess with a clean dry cloth. Don't worry about applying too much oil - more is better. 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Mineral oil is an old standby treatment for constipation. If you want information regarding this use, ... You're in the wrong forum.

For present purposes, all you need to know is that it passes through your system without being broken down or absorbed by the gut. It probably would have no effect if used on your bowl if it's absorbed by the wood.


David

edh's picture
edh

Oh heavens Micki!

I'm so sorry if I confused or shocked you; now you know what I meant when I said my pharmacist thought I had a problem!

Really though, mineral oil is all you need; I just said the bit about beeswax in case you ended up finding only food safe finishes that had a bit in them, they're fine too. Carnauba wax really isn't anything you want or need to mess with for this; by itself it's an incredibly hard wax that needs very high heats (well, 180 F) to melt it. Wood turners apply it straight by using the friction of a fast turning piece of wood to heat it up. I melt it into a homemade paste wax along with beeswax and mineral oil so that I can rub it on, let it sit, then buff it off for a sheen on decorative, more sculptural bowls. Not what I'd do for a kneading bowl though!

Sorry not to have responded sooner; I was off line for a bit.

edh

micki's picture
micki

bread bowl as i found it