The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Mockmill 100 vs 200: principal difference

Irina Merkulova's picture
Irina Merkulova

Mockmill 100 vs 200: principal difference

Hi! Planing to buy Mockmill for home using, but I don't understand principal difference between 100 and 200. 

200 give more fine grinding?

200 can grind more solid grain?

Or they differ only in the speed of grinding?... 

Help me understand pls! 

thank you in advance)

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

I don't have either, but according to the PleasantHill Grain website, they have the same size stones, and look to have a similar layout, and the only difference listed is the size of the motor.  My guess is that the 200 will grind the berries faster than the 100, and that the 200 is more suited to larger amounts of berries than the 100 at a time, because it has a more powerful motor. 

Irina Merkulova's picture
Irina Merkulova

Thank you for your feedback. 

Yes, I know that they have a difference in engine power. Can the engine power affect the degree of grain grinding?

ifs201's picture
ifs201

I have the 100 and generally bake 2 loaves each weekend. I really like the 100. A lot of cottage bakers use the 200, but if you are just using the mill for family baking than the 100 is probably fine. I mill rye, spelt, wheat, corn generally.

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

Irina, no,  I don't think the size of the motor will affect the fineness of the flour.  In general, the fineness of the flour is determined by the how flat the stones are, how close they are set together, and what allowances the manufacturer has made for variations in the plane of rotation.  AFAIK,  both models use the same stones, held in the same way, and the mechanism to adjust them is the same , so they should give similar results in terms of coarseness and fineness of flour.  

naturaleigh's picture
naturaleigh

I have the Mockmill 200 and am very happy with it.  It grinds the wheat berries pretty quickly without too much dust thrown up.  I got the 200 because of the difference in the motor size compared to the 100, but based on my prior research, I think either would have been fine for my 1-2 loaves per week, plus a couple of batches of focaccia and/or pizza dough.  To be fair, this was the first mill I have owned so I have nothing to compare it to.  I am glad I finally bought one as it allows so much more flexibility in bakes and you can't get flour any fresher than from your own mill!  It's been a fun adventure making my own flour blends and I like that I can mill to whatever coarseness I want.  I like to use slightly coarse durum flour in my pizza dough and store bought is a bit too fine--not a problem when you have a home mill as you can grind it how you want it.  

I guess it will all depend on how much flour you think you want to mill each week.  If it will be a fair amount, I would go with the 200 for speed.  If just one to two loaves per week, you'd probably be OK with the 100.

sblevine's picture
sblevine

I own the 100 and I am very happy with it.   But, I find that if I dump a pound of wheat into the hopper on the finest setting it will stall the motor and the only thing to do at that point is to dump it all out (a pain given the weight of the machine) and dribble it in.   So my standard procedure now is to grind twice, once at a course setting and again at the finest.   Even then, on a rare occasion the course grind may need a little encouragement to go down the hole.   So that is one reason to consider the 200 model.   In my marketplace I have access to only one wheat and it's not labeled so I can't know if it's a hard wheat or not so if you're grinding a soft wheat your millage may differ.   

Another consideration is that grinding wheat in this machine is VERY noisy and at my age, wanting to hold on to my hearing, I am using ear protectors.  Something to consider.

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

sblevine,  I recommend hearing protectors, or doing it in a separate room for nearly all mills I have used .  The mills themselves normally make some noise ( some louder than others ) but the actual grinding of the grain also makes a ton of noise.   The quietest I have , by far, is the Retsel, all the others vary from very loud ,  to wow that is loud.  

charbono's picture
charbono

When grinding hard wheat, I compare the noise of my Retsel Mil-Rite to a microwave oven.  After a couple of years, I started wearing ear protectors, just to be on the safe side.

 

Irina Merkulova's picture
Irina Merkulova

yes, I read that someone grinds twice to get a finer grind. However, the manufacturer itself does not give such recommendations. I don't know if double grinding has a negative effect on the millstones. But if you first grind into grits and the second time into flour, then probably nothing will happen to the millstons. I think so) 

And many just say that these mills work quiter then others. But for me a noise isn't a problem. 

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

Some manufacturers say do not double grind, because the mill is designed in such a way that the size of the berries limits the amount of wheat that can be in the milling chamber at one time -  For example, the Lee, which uses a totally different system, has a very narrow tube to feed berries into the chamber, and only admits more once the ones in there are milled and exhausted to the collection bag - so trying if you poured a bunch of already partially milled berries - flour into the hopper , it could easily overload the mill and cause the motor to stop, and if not shut off immediately, could burn out the motor.  If you needed to do it, because you milled it too coarse by mistake,  it would be clumsy, but you could feed small amounts into the lee at a time, and listen to the motor to make sure the milling chamber does not get too full.   The Komo, which is similar to the Mockmill, has a different design, and is not as sensitive to the size of the input - so I doubt it would damage the machine or the stones,  though you would still want to listen ( even with your hearing protection on ) and if you hear the motor start to labor or slow down,  you would turn it off and empty the hopper .

gglockner's picture
gglockner

In my experience, the Mockmill 100 will seize up if you load the hopper with hard-to-mill grain and turn on the power while the stones are set to a very fine grind. The solution is to start the motor with the hopper empty, adjust the grind until the stones are just barely touching, add grain, and set the grind just one stop finer if desired.

Also, I found that it doesn't work on a fine grind for unhulled buckwheat. The solution was to switch to hulled buckwheat.

sblevine's picture
sblevine

There is no constraint on two pass milling on the Mockmill 100 from the manufacturer.  And since the mill is designed to mill even the smallest spices like mustard seed or grains like quinoa, small gains of wheat are not a problem.

charbono's picture
charbono

Another option is to mill, sift, and re-mill just the coarse fraction.  That said, I wouldn't buy a mill if I thought it wouldn't produce reasonably fine wheat flour on the first pass.

Ryanfalen's picture
Ryanfalen

I have the 200 and I think it's all about increased grinding time. I have heard (from someone who used to own one) the 100 can only grind for so long before overheating the motor and needing to stop for 20 mins or so to let it cool down...the 200 can grind for hours without overheating or stopping. Come in handy when you have to grind flour for 100 loaves a week or more.