The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Croissants not proofing.

miuxsa's picture
miuxsa

Croissants not proofing.

Hello

 

I’m making croissants. I have rolled and shaped them about 3-4 hours ago and still they have not proofed. They haven’t changed in shape/size whatsoever. I have put them in a room with the temperature of 23 celsius. 

 

I have made croissants before and they didn’t workout. at first it was because I used a regular butter “Lurpak” and it was a mess. Then I used President butter as it’s the only french type of butter I could find where I live (in the middle east). It was better but not perfect as you know the water content is still a bit higher than recommended. Butter started peaking and I’m not sure if it was just the butter or the dough itself was thin more than it should be? i tried to conceal the patches with a bit of flour dusted on top. I managed to roll the dough and shape the croissants. They look decent and I tried to keep the butter as solid as I could without making it rock hard. I don’t know why the croissants aren’t rising though. Could it be because of the flour (I don’t think I have used a lot of it since I just dusted on top) or could it be the temperature? I’m afraid if I set it at a higher temperature the butter would melt. 

 

 

Also I have read that I could whip the butter and add flour to it so it would help with the melting and the rolling situation. 

 

I love baking so much and I really want to master the croissants. But I’m afraid I won’t be able to without proper French butter 

 

Thank you 

foodforthought's picture
foodforthought

I assume you’re using some sort of yeast and not just straight sourdough levain? I‘d start by testing your yeast by placing a small amount in some water with a little sugar or honey. It should respond fairly quickly (within 5-10 minutes) by liquefying then bubbling. Dough not rising sounds a lot like the yeast is tired or possibly overproofed upstream of shaping.
You might also get more/better counsel by providing your formula and process for prepping the dough prior to laminating and shaping.

Good luck,

Phil

miuxsa's picture
miuxsa

Hello Phil 

 

Thank you for getting back to me. 

I don’t think it’s the yeast as the dough itself had risen before the lamination process. I have used Julia Child’s recipe for the dough. The yeast (yes, it was commercial yeast) did in fact bloom as I prepped the rest of the ingredients. I let the dough rise for two hours in room temperature, shaped it and let it rise again overnight in the fridge. Next morning I started the lamination process with the butter. The first turn was going really well until the second turn where a small patches of butter appeared. I tried to cover them with a bit of flour dust and continued the process. After that, I shaped them into croissants, egg wash and let them proof. I let them proof for a really long time, more than six hours and nothing has changed. 

 

Is it possible that the yeast can’t handle this amount of time? If so, is there a way where it would be possible? Or should I just make my own levain and do it that way? 

 

Thank you 

foodforthought's picture
foodforthought

Have used Julia’s recipe many times though lately I’ve been riffing with sourdough levain and pate fermentee. The symptoms sure sounded like possible over proofing.

That said some batches of croissant don’t exhibit a whole lot of obvious proof poof for me, either. Did you get some spring when you actually baked them? Even when I don’t see much poof, if the surface feels soft after an appropriate rest they seem to rise fairly well on baking. Let me know how your quest progresses.

Best wishes,

Phil

miuxsa's picture
miuxsa

hello phil

 

i have baked them after 6-8 hours knowing they did not proof at all and they basically had the texture of biscuit or something like that. not croissants at all. just shaped like them. so i think i will try the recipe again with less time proofing the dough because i did let it proof for a longer period of time (before shaping).

 

thank you phil 

just passing by's picture
just passing by

I think maybe your yeast might have fizzled out before the final rise.  I've had yeast work during the first rise, but then after that--nothing.  This was regular active dry yeast and not instant or rapid rise either.  The only difference is it was the store brand and not the regular national brand I usually buy.

miuxsa's picture
miuxsa

hello 

 

thank you for replying 

i do think it’s the yeast too. but this one isn’t a generic  brand yeast and it works perfectly with other recipes ive tried with it. but maybe because i let the dough rise/proof for a longer time than i should’ve. i will try it again with proper time managing. 

 

thank you 

retired baker's picture
retired baker

after 2 hrs on the table it was a gonner.  expired.

2 hrs in the cooler would be the way to go. 

Its not the butter.