The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bread of Summer: Corn, Tomato & Basil SD

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Bread of Summer: Corn, Tomato & Basil SD

Got a very classic but delicious combo. It’s hard to go wrong with corn for it’s at its peak at the moment. What better time to have corn bread than now?

 

 

Corn, Tomato & Basil SD with 40% Sprouted Durum

 

Dough flour

Final Dough

Levain

Total Dough

 

g

%

g

%

g

%

g

%

Flour (All Freshly Milled)

300

100

270

100

30

100

303

100

Sprouted Durum

120

40

    

120

39.60

Whole Kamut Flour

180

60

    

180

59.41

White Whole Wheat Flour (Starter)

      

1.5

0.50

Whole Rye Flour (Starter)

      

1.5

0.50

         

Hydration

    

33

100

273

90.10

Water

  

240

88.89

30

100

273

90.10

         

Salt

4

1.33

4

1.48

  

4

1.32

Vital Wheat Gluten

7.5

2.5

7.5

2.78

  

7.5

2.48

Starter (100% Hydration)

    

6

20.00

  

Levain

  

66

24.44

    
         

Add-ins

72

20.00

72

26.67

  

72

23.76

Grilled Corn

60

20.00

60

22.22

  

60

19.80

Concentrated Tomato Paste

9

3.00

9

3.33

  

9

2.97

Dried Basil

3

1.00

3

1.11

  

3

0.99

         

Total

  

659.5

244.26

66

220.00

659.5

217.66

 

Sift out the bran from dough flour, reserve 30 g for the leaven. Soak the rest, if any, in equal amount of water taken from dough ingredients.

Combine all leaven ingredients and let sit until ready, about 4 hours (29°C).

Roughly combine all dough ingredients except for the corn. Ferment for a total of 3 hours. Mix on low for 2 minutes at the 30 and 40 minute mark. Fold in the corn at the 50 minute-mark. After the bulk, shape the dough then put in into a banneton. Freeze for 1 hour before retarding in the fridge for 10 hours.

Preheat the oven at 250°C/482°F. Score and spritz the dough. Remove the dough from the fridge and bake straight at 250°C/482°F with steam for 20 minutes then without steam for 25 minutes more or until the internal temperature reaches a minimum of 208°F. Let it cool for a minimum of 2 hours before slicing.

 

 

This bread is loaded with corn. Some of the corn fell out while I was slicing it… It’s perfect for those with a sweet tooth. The basil added a savoury touch, which I really like. The tomato is undetectable though. I should probably be less stingy with it.

 

____

 

Dou Ban Jiang braised glass noodles with egg tofu

 

Preserved duck egg & Chinese sausage garlicky fettuccine

 

Fried egg topped minced lamb ragu with rice

 

Sweet and sour rice noodles with shrimps & peppers

 

Macau-Portuguese-inspired salted cod scrambled egg fries

 

Wasabi soy seaweed rice cake squares with kipper

 

Lamb & zucchini dumplings

 

Chicken makhani, coconut chole, marinated eggs, kipper with red cabbages, mixed veggies, spiced biryani, and naan

 

“Batzels”

 

Comments

Benito's picture
Benito

Elsie, I’m always impressed at how much effort you put into your wonderful meals.  I usually don’t have the energy to make more than a one course meal on a daily basis.

Love the bread, I’m not sure that I’ve seen roasted corn in bread before, it bet it was really good.  I’ve used tomato paste as well before and found other than a hint of colour, it didn’t do much for the flavour.  I agree you have to be more generous with it to actually taste it in bread.

Love the pretzel bagel, I love both so why not make them as one!

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

This wasn't my first bake with it in fact. I posted another one some time ago, with Thai sweet chili sauce instead of tomato paste :)  If a natural red dye is desired, I might go for smoked or sweet paprika instead. Not only has it got more colour, but also more flavour.  

For 6 days of the week, I only cook lunch for myself. The meals are generally simple and quick to whip up. I do prepare dinner for my parents and myself, but merely once a week. So it's not that I'm spending a lot of time in the kitchen every day. The weather is too hot for that. The tricky part about cooking for my parents is that quite a few ingredients are banned from the menu. Coincidentally, many are some of my favourite foods, including lamb, squid, oyster, capelin, beef tongue and all cheese (esp. blue cheese and goat cheese what???) except Mozzarella and Cheddar... 

The pretzel bagel is pretty good indeed. Very chew and has got that typical alkaline flavour. Absolutely no substitute for lye!

isand66's picture
isand66

I love adding corn to bread.  I've experimented with this several times as well. I just posted my last bake with polenta which also is worth trying.  This formula would make some excellent rolls to have with some brisket and ribs :).

Love all of the food, especially those dumplings!  Tell me more about your Batzels.  Those sound fabulous.

Regards,

Ian

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

It was a firm 53% hydration Tipo 00 bread flour dough. To gain better control over the fermentation, I adopted a 50% hydration biga (70 g flour + 35 g water) instead of the regular SD starter. It doubled after 6 hours (29°C) with 0.1% instant dry yeast. I mixed it with 170 g flour, 92 g water and 1.5% salt. This contributed to roughly 30% prefermented flour. The dough was left to rest for half an hour. Then, I rolled it out and passed it through the pasta machine... Much kinder to my shoulder than traditional kneading :) When the dough sheet looked smooth, I divided it into four equal parts and kneaded them briefly to get four balls. After a 30 minute rest, each ball was rolled into a thick rope. The ends were joint by gentle pressing so that it formed a ring. The rings were placed on a parchment lined baking sheet and proofed until 30% risen. They were then sent to the fridge to retard overnight. The next morning, I dipped them in 4% lye solution and baked them for 12 minutes at 450°C. The Batzels have got the best of both worlds: the chewy bagel texture and the characteristic pretzel flavour! 

Glad you like the bread and the dumplings, Ian! Corn is indeed a fantastic addition to bread. I'll surely check out your polenta bread tomorrow. Tired from the lab works at the moment. Brisket and ribs definitely sound like the perfect kind of pick me ups!

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks for sharing your formula and procedure.  Very interesting with the biga. Normally when I make yeasted pretzel rolls I do it as a straight dough, but I may have to give this method a try.

Happy Baking!

Ian

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

I hardly bake with straight dough anymore. Using a preferment like biga and poolish not only improves flavour, but more importantly, allows more time flexibility. It can be refrigerated if I end up not having time to baby sit the dough. Moreover, it speeds the bulk fermentation up so I can save time.