The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Finaly I think my pizza dough is perfect.

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

Finaly I think my pizza dough is perfect.

Laat addtions some honey to give the crust more color. 

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

You can't post that you found perfection and not share.. recipe please! :)

 

Benito's picture
Benito

I agree with Frank, please share your formula.

Benny

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

80% pizza flour
20% semolina
60% water
2% salt
2% olive oil
2,5% honey
2,5% starter


Levain
45 gram pizza flour
45 gram water
9 gram starter

 235 gram pizza flour
75 gram semolino
164 gram water
9 gram honey
7,1 gram salt
7,1 gram olive oil

Bulk rise on 30 degree C for 3 ours
Then about 24 ours in the fridge.

Get it out of the fridge about two ours before baking.

G Pizza's picture
G Pizza

Looks Yummy, on occasion I'll use molasses for color at less than 5%.  

Benito's picture
Benito

Thanks for sharing your formula dbazuin. 

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

I use flour from Mulino Caputa
80% tipo 00 ‘Cuoco’
20% semola rimacinata

 

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

dba:  Thank you for the further specifications about the flours that you use.

just a point of reference..... semola rimacinata is known in the US as refined durum flour, or fancy durum flour, or extra fancy durum flour.

Semolina, the word by itself, no qualifiers, in the US, is generally understood to be the gritty kind, not the fine-ground flour.

--

another point of reference... semolina, in the US (and international, as far as I know)  is without the bran and germ.  

I have not encountered or heard about "whole wheat semolina" (so far.)

But,... there is whole wheat (whole grain) "durum flour."  

Net:  "semolina",  the word by itself, no qualifiers, means "gritty" and "bran-less/germ-less."  and, of course, it comes from the durum grain.

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

I live in The Netherlands and this flour comes from Italy. 
I buy it from a small webshop specialized in everything pizza. 

I assume your comment is specialy intresting for USA citizens. 

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin
gavinc's picture
gavinc

Reminds me of Barbara Eden materialising from the bottle (I dream of Jeannie). Wonderful teenage years :)

 

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin
idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

Molto bene!

 

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

Thanks

GrainBrain's picture
GrainBrain

Thank you for sharing your pizza recipe, can't wait to try it, yours looks truly photo perfect. For those in the U.S., Caputo "Semola Rimacinata" can be sourced from Italian specialty food stores and comes in a 1kg package. The package says: "Durum Semola with high elasticity and compact calibrated granulation, ideal for fresh pasta making and durum bread."
The U.S. importer is Orlando Food Sales in Maywood, NJ

Timothy Wilson's picture
Timothy Wilson

Looks really perfect, you did a great job. I wish I always had such appetite and round pizza. You've mentioned about adding honey for color, I've never heard about it but start thinking about adding it too.

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

I get it from from a Italian pizza chef in one of the many video’s I watched. I guess it is the sugar I have also see some guy using malted sugar. 
Getting the round shape is not something I get right every time. I think even the last one is not perfect but  close enough. 


I have everything I need in stock so I will give it a other try later this week. 

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

I get it from from a Italian pizza chef in one of the many video’s I watched. I guess it is the sugar I have also see some guy using malted sugar. 
Getting the round shape is not something I get right every time. I think even the last one is not perfect but  close enough. 


I have everything I need in stock so I will give it a other try later this week. 

GlennM's picture
GlennM

I bake my pizza in a blackstone pizza oven and the taste of the honey is very nice, but, it will burn at high heat before the top is properly melted. I find if I drop the honey I can use the very hot deck and it  comes out great. I leave the dough balls two or three days before using and I have gone as long as a week with no issues 

 

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

Looks tasty. 

GrainBrain's picture
GrainBrain

Just to clarify, I have nothing to do with the great pizzas in the photos and can only offer my compliments.
But, to help those with a home oven who, like me, are baking at 550 degrees. A recipe and hydration are best matched to the correct oven temperature. We miss the mark when we copy a technique perfect for hotter ovens. At 550 you may find a tablespoon or less of honey improves browning, be careful to add it late in your dough mixing. Within reason you can adjust the amount for correct browning, but it's always a balancing act with the perfectly baked crust and getting your toppings baked perfectly. I wish everyone good eating, great pizza is not as simple as it looks ;- (

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

Mine recepi is made for baking at 250° C that is as high as my oven get. If you have a oven that goes to 300 a 350 then you do not need the oil or maybe even not the honey. 

 

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

Mine recepi is made for baking at 250° C that is as high as my oven get. If you have a oven that goes to 300 a 350 then you do not need the oil or maybe even not the honey.