The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Another new Ank owner angst!

Wisygreen's picture
Wisygreen

Another new Ank owner angst!

I am a new owner having broken two KA mixers over the past 3 years.  I loved the bread I used to get from our local bakers in England - just a plain white sandwich loaf and could not get it in California so I have spent the last 8 years making it every week.  After the second mixer broke I was kneading by hand.  Perfect results every time.  I use about 60% hydration, just flour (white 12.2% protein) water, 10% yeast, 20% salt.  Sadly I just cannot seem to make it with my lovely shiny Ank.  I have tried roller and dough hook.  The latest batch I made (1200 gms flour) are a little better but no oven spring at all.  I ran the machine on low until mixed then left for 20 minutes.  Turned the machine on medium for 5 minutes, then another 5, then another 2.  The dough was just clogging on the dough hook and not kneading, it got better then became very tacky.  Did I over knead?  I have tried a higher hydration but did not like the texture and it made a heavy loaf.  Any suggestions?  What am I doing wrong?

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Can you post a very short video?

Also Doc.dough (Fresh Loaf user) post this video that may help.
https://youtu.be/VNHRiHcPgMU

GrainBrain's picture
GrainBrain

I'm getting my eyes checked this week, but am questioning what I'm reading. Do you truly mean 20% salt, or 20g?

20% would be 240 g of salt, or nearly half a pound! Seems that could influence oven spring ; - ( 

Are you using instant yeast? Or what type? There are some clues here in that you were kneading by hand and things went well. What about kneading more at medium or above until you sense it becoming a bit tacky, then a short rest? The good news is you aren't going to break your Ank, it does require adapting your methods a bit. Have you tried the roller with various amounts of spacing relative to the rim? Would love to see this work for you, please clarify yeast and salt in grams.

Rock's picture
Rock

I don't own an Ank so I can't speak to whether you're overmixing, but that seems like a long time to me. What is the temperature of your dough after that mix? Optimum temperature for me after a mix is 76°.

Dave

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

This sounds qua hydration a bit like my pizza dough. 
I mix that on slow speed for a minute or 2 and then set the timer on 8 minutes and set the speed to about ⅔. 

I only use the roller so It about a inch from the side when the dough gets firmer.  
I do the window pane test and mix a other 2 minutes id needed. 

The dough for my four grain boule I mix on high speed setting the timer on max (about 15 minutes). 

Wisygreen's picture
Wisygreen

Thanks for t% dried yeast and 2% salt.  I will try and post a video after I next try later this week.   I do love the machine but am perplexed by it so I really appreciate everyones input and support.

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

Stick with it,  you should get there.  I think the users that had the most experience with KA's have a slightly tougher time with the Ank that those of use that used other mixers.  So far, there is nothing my Electrolux ( older version of the Ank ) can't do.  

GrainBrain's picture
GrainBrain

Many here would like to offer a response, but a useful one is hard without observing your method. This is an issue with many posts.

What is unknown is whether you put all ingredients in the bowl at once, or add flour then water, or water then flour? It's just a question of matching method to machine. Have you tried putting your starter in first, then adding water, breaking up the starter, then adding flour combined with yeast and salt gradually? You will discover that adding ingredients in a different order will yield different results. Hope you can get the best result with very little experimentation.

Camarie's picture
Camarie

I still have the older version of the Ank, the Electrolux Assistant DLX- 2000, & it still works good!!
GrainBrain's picture
GrainBrain

Thanks for your photo and I'm happy to see what this machine has gone through. Just based on your photo, I don't think there are any serious functional differences with a new one. It's a great testimonial to why people should buy one AND be patient in learning how to get the most out of it.

Camarie's picture
Camarie

You're welcome.