The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Herb-y Nutty(Seed-y?) SD ×2

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Herb-y Nutty(Seed-y?) SD ×2

Two herb-y nutty SD this week. One with cheese and one without. Make your choice… Or let’s have both :)

 

 

Tarragon Walnut SD with 40% Sprouted Durum

 

Dough flour

Final Dough

Levain

Total Dough

 

g

%

g

%

g

%

g

%

Flour (All Freshly Milled)

300

100

273

100

27

100

303

100

Sprouted Durum Flour

120

40

    

120

39.60

Whole Kamut Flour

120

40

    

120

39.60

Amaranth Flour

60

20

    

60

19.80

White Whole Wheat Flour (Starter)

      

1.5

0.50

Whole Rye Flour (Starter)

      

1.5

0.50

         

Hydration

    

30

100

261

86.14

Cold Water + Hot water

  

231

84.62

27

100

261

86.14

         

Salt

4

1.33

4

1.47

  

4

1.32

Vital Wheat Gluten

7.5

2.5

7.5

2.75

  

7.5

2.48

Starter (100% Hydration)

    

6

22.22

  

Levain

  

60

21.98

    
         

Add-ins

39

12.00

39

14.29

  

39

12.87

Toasted Walnuts

36

12.00

36

13.19

  

36

11.88

Dried Tarragon

3

1.00

3

1.10

  

3

0.99

         

Total

  

614.5

225.09

60

222.22

614.5

202.81


 

Rosemary Edam Pumpkin Seed SD with 40% Sprouted Emmer

 

Dough flour

Final Dough

Levain

Total Dough

 

g

%

g

%

g

%

g

%

Flour (All Freshly Milled)

300

100

270

100

30

100

303

100

Sprouted Blue Emmer Flour

120

40

    

120

39.60

Whole Kamut Flour

180

60

    

180

59.41

White Whole Wheat Flour (Starter)

      

1.5

0.50

Whole Rye Flour (Starter)

      

1.5

0.50

         

Hydration

    

33

100

303

100.00

Water

  

270

100.00

30

100

303

100.00

         

Salt

4

1.33

4

1.48

  

4

1.32

Vital Wheat Gluten

7.5

2.5

7.5

2.78

  

7.5

2.48

Starter (100% Hydration)

    

6

20.00

  

Levain

  

66

24.44

    
         

Add-ins

58.5

12.00

58.5

21.67

  

58.5

19.31

Edam, Diced

36

12.00

36

13.33

  

36

11.88

Toasted Pumpkin Seeds

21

7.00

21

7.78

  

21

6.93

Dried Rosemary

1.5

0.50

1.5

0.56

  

1.5

0.50

         

Total

  

676

250.37

66

220.00

676

223.10

 

(* For the instruction below, the numbers before and after the slash (/) are for the 1st formula and the 2nd formula respectively)


Sift out the bran from dough flour, reserve 27/30 g for the leaven. Soak the rest, if any, in equal amount of water taken from dough ingredients.

Combine all leaven ingredients and let sit until ready, about 4/4 hours (28/28.5°C).

Roughly combine all dough ingredients except for the nuts, seeds and cheese. For both bread, ferment for a total of 4 hours. Mix on low for 2 minutes at the 30 and 40 minute mark. Fold in the reserved add-ins at the 50 minute-mark. After the bulk, shape the dough then put in into a banneton. Freeze for 1 hour before retarding in the fridge for 10 hours.

Preheat the oven at 250°C/482°F. Score and spritz the dough. Remove the dough from the fridge and bake straight at 250°C/482°F with steam for 20 minutes then without steam for 25 minutes more or until the internal temperature reaches a minimum of 208°F. Let it cool for a minimum of 2 hours before slicing.

Both loaves are quite complex in terms of flavour and texture. The first one is sweeter with the yellow grains and the vanilla aroma of tarragon, while the second has an additional salty note from the cheese. I might enjoy the latter a touch more. After all, it has got cheese.

 

____

 

Macau Portuguese-inspired salted cod fried rice

 Egg & shiitake mushroom Zhajiang noodles with crispy peanuts

 Minced lamb & pea biryani

 Ancho chili spinach mushroom Edam enchiladas

 Simple fried rice noodles with snap peas, Chinese sausages & marinated eggs

 

Chicken & mushroom fettuccine in creamy coconut sauce

 

Spicy lamb & leek gozleme 

 

Comments

Benito's picture
Benito

Elsie, great baking and cooking as always.  Salivating here looking at the amazing foods.  I'm not familiar with Spicy lamb & leek gozleme, but they too look delicious.

Benny

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

The gozleme was pretty killer :) It was bursting with flavor and there was lamb juice dripping out... It was't by any means traditional though. The filling was inspired by both Chinese stuffed bing and Indian paratha. I seasoned the caramelized lamb and leek with ground cumin, coriander, smoked paprika and asafoetida. The mixture was then spread onto a thinly rolled out leavened dough. It was folded over and pan fried to achieve a golden crust. I particularly like the contrast in texture between the crispy crust, chewy bread and tender lamb. Every time I make stuffed flat bread or buns, I shout to myself that I should make them way more often!

Glad you like the food! Thanks for the comment as always. 

isand66's picture
isand66

The breads look fantastic!  The food as always is making me salivate.  

Happy Baking.

Ian

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Not everyone appreciates this kind of bread. There are quite a few people who judge bread by crumb size. To them, larger holes = better bread. Hopefully, they will learn to love other kinds of bread one day as they broaden their horizons. Why limit yourself to one when you can enjoy them all? It's a pity how whole grain bread gets such a bad reputation flavour-wise. If only people could stop purchasing commercial whole wheat bread made with rancid flour... 

Thanks for the compliment! Happy baking and stay safe.

Hotbake's picture
Hotbake

Delicious looking bread!

May I steal the recipe of your dough for the gozleme please? Oh that looks so good

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

The formula for the dough couldn't be simpler. It was a 65% hydration AP flour dough with 0.1% instant dry yeast and 0.5% salt. I roughly combined all the ingredients and let it rest for an hour. After that, it was manually mixed for around 3 minutes. Then, it was left to ferment overnight, around 8 hours (30°C). It almost tripled the next day as the weather was so hot... I gently shaped it into a ball, rolled it out and stuffed it as described in the comment above. For gozleme of this size, 70 g flour and 100 g lamb mince were used. 

This week I've been experimenting with glutinous rice flour. I steamed some man tou made with 20% glutinous rice flour. This gave them a snowy white colour and a mochi-like texture. It'd probably extend their shelf life by improving moisture retention too. I think subbing a portion of glutinous rice flour for AP flour would be a nice upgrade to the gozleme dough. 

Thanks for your comment, Hotbake! Glad to see you back. Hope you'd be savouring some gozleme soon :)

Hotbake's picture
Hotbake

I've got 4 pounds of lamb shoulder chop the other day and besides my usual Moroccan lamb stew I want to make something like potstickers but you just gave me an even better idea. 

I've used glutinous rice flour for mochi brownies(with straight raw flour in batter)and hokkaido milk buns( with a cooked tangzhong/mochi made of milk and sticky rice flour), I absolutely love the texture. Sounds like a promising experiment to me!

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

There're so many possibilities with lamb. Potstickers are by no means a bad idea. Why would you have to decide between the two when you've got 4 lbs of lamb? I couldn't think of a reason for giving up on either :) Actually, I made some zucchini lamb potstickers last week. I'm craving them again thanks to you!

It's brave of you to attempt making tangzhong with sticky rice flour. I tried it once and got quite frustrated. The mochi tangzhong loved my hands so much that it resisted parting with them... I'd rather stick to regular wheat flour tangzhong since then. I love mochi-textured baked goods too. Pao de queijo is one of my favorites among all. I haven't had much success replicating them at home though. Good luck with your mochi experiment!

Hotbake's picture
Hotbake

The majority of the lamb shoulder and all of the bones goes to my Moroccan lamb stew😋Which I usually made huge batches and freeze them! I think I'm definitely going to use the rest for the gozleme this time.

For mochi tangzhong, I've gone through my phase of soft bread addiction, so I developed some short cuts, to avoid handling the tangzhong directly without a mixer, right after cooking the mochi tangzhong and off the heat, pour cold milk/water in it, break it down with a spoon or whisk, that should cool it quite a bit, and when the temperature is cool enough just dump the flour, yeast and the rest of the ingredients in there, much easier to mix. 

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Nope. There is hardly room for 4 lbs of raw lamb, not to mention lamb stew made from that... 

I used to practice a similar approach as you did: stir the rest of the dough water into the tangzhong right off the heat. It certainly made my life easier. However, now I've learnt a little more about starch gelatinization from my food chemistry course. If the hot paste was disturbed while cooling, gel formation would be disrupted. I ain't sure how significant the impact would be. Yet the gelling performance and thus the water holding capacity of the starch granules might be compromised to some degree. Guess we can't have our cake and eat it too :(

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

and i havent even looked at the plate specials yet!  Oh my!  I gotta go eat something fast and come back.  Unfortunately I wish I had just one of your breads in my kitchen right now.  Nuts!    :)

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Your sweet words definitely put a smile on my face :) The plate specials rarely reappear on the menu so enjoy them while they last! I've finished the last three slices of this batch of bread this morning so there is none left in my kitchen as well... A new loaf is almost ready to slice though. I bet there are some rye loaves sitting in your kitchen too.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

for me.  First time in along time no bread in kitchen or freezer!  Yes, it can happen.  We've been working in the garden and putting a fence up and time just flies by so quickly!   So need to bake a quick loaf while the sourdough is fermenting.  This cool spell weather is perfect for using the oven!

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

It only happened to me a few times that I ran out of bread. Now I usually plan ahead so that the tragedy wouldn't take place again. Nothing wrong with a quick yeasted loaf. Any loaf is better then no loaf :) Guess your garden must be blooming with all your hard work!

I'm so jealous of your cool weather! It can get to 33°C here and there's no sign of cooling down. I'm all wet every time I turn on the oven or stove.