The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

FWSY overnight straight loose

Surfcast23's picture
Surfcast23

FWSY overnight straight loose

I have made this recipe a few times with success so last night I decided to experiment. Instead of using  AP I used Caputo 00. Did the over night bulk then shaped the dough  and it look and felt pretty much as it has in the past. I put the dough in the frige last intending to bake today. When I took it out today the dough was far gassier,  had tripled in size and was looser than in the past. I have read that 00 absorbs more water than AP so my question is could that have contributed to the looseness and can it still be baked? Also can I work more flour into it?

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

Who knows?  Try both ways, assuming you used dry yeast, and not sourdough.  Divide in two.  Bake half, as is, folded and shaped, in a pan (tin), or any oven-safe vessel of appropriate size. (I have used borosilicate {Pyrex} bowls and measuring cups, up to 2 liter.) The other half: Add more 00 flour, let proof again, and then bake however seems good to you.  Please report back and let everyone know how they turned out.

By the way, did you add diastatic malt, or some sugar, to your 00 flour?  Or did you use pre-malted flour?

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By the way-2, just saying "00 flour" is confusing/insufficient.  There are many types of 00 flour, of all kinds of protein levels, and elasticity/extensibility types, and strength types.  In the US, many people mistakenly think 00 flour is specifically pizza flour, but that is not accurate. 00 just means the ash content (hat tip to mwilson), and doesn't specify protein or other attributes.  Besides, this is a world-wide forum, where not everyone has the 00=pizza notion.   If you want to educate yourself a bit on the various types of 00 flour, you could start with the Caputo English web site:  www.mulinocaputo.it/en/flour

 

Surfcast23's picture
Surfcast23

I will try it both ways. The flour was Caputo 00 and it did say whether it was pre-malted or not. Other than substituting the 00 for AP I followed the recipe exactly so there was no sugar or malt added. 

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

Caputo has 3 types of 00 pizza flours,  "Pizzeria", "Pizza A Metro", and "00 Americana".  All three are available in the US through www.brickovenbaker.com  and other re-sellers.  

"Pizzeria" has no malt.  "Pizza A Metro" has a little malted wheat flour. "00 Americana" has a little more malted wheat flour.

Caputo has several other 00 types of flour for bread: Classica, Chef/Cuoco, Superiore, and Saccorosso/Rinforzato.  Several of which are, or have been, featured on brickovenbaker.com

Personally, the only Caputo flour I used was the "Chef" type.   I thought it hydrated well with less water, percentage wise, than King Arthur All Purpose. IE, it was less thirsty.

 

Surfcast23's picture
Surfcast23

Hi Idaveindy,

I got the flour from nuts.com and this was their description. 

For a pizza crust that will surely impress, make it with 00 flour! Milled slowly for optimal water absorption, this flour can be used at high temperatures between 500-600 degrees Fahrenheit. It’s a blend of select wheat varieties on the Italian and European market, to produce a flavorful crust. We recommend using 00 flour for American-style pizza. You’ll love the crust so much, you’ll almost want to eat it alone without the toppings.

This flour is 12.5% gluten. The high quality protein and gluten content are optimal for a consistent dough.

New to all of this so please forgive my ignorance. 

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

I found the 00 flour page at nuts.com: https://nuts.com/cookingbaking/flours/00-flour/2.html

It looks like they borrowed the descriptive copy from https://brickovenbaker.com/collections/caputo-flour-00/products/antimo-caputo-americana-pizza-00-flour

They are not explicit, but the 500-600 degree part sure makes it  "sound like" it's the 00 Americana that has a little malted wheat, which is what makes it for 500-600 degree ovens.   In other words, it's a "re-pack", and there is nothing wrong with that.  Yet... they say it's 12.5% protein, which is Caputo's regular "Pizzeria", not "00 Americana."

So.... nuts.com is creating some confusion there.

And there's nothing too wrong with using Caputo's "00 Americana", or regular "Pizzeria" for bread.  It's just "different".  And needs a little tweak in terms of hydration.  And perhaps less yeast, and/or less ferment/proof times due to the added malted wheat in Americana.

If I'm correct about it being Caputo's "00 Americana", then nuts.com should have explicitly said so, and should have included "malted wheat flour" in the ingredients.  Also, "00 Americana" is 14.25% protein according to Caputo, not 12.5%.

If it is not Caputo's  "00 Americana" flour , then they borrowed text/copy from the wrong web page. 😉

Now I'm _really_ curious how your bread turns out.  Americana, as a strong flour, will likely survive the re-mix of additional flour, but will probably result in chewy bread due to the high protein.

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

The Cuoco is the pizza flour for long fermatation. 
I recently bought a few bags of specilay for overnight fermation SD pizza dough. 

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

Yes, from the specifications, I can imagine that it would be a good pizza flour.

Do you add any diastatic malt or "dough conditioners" to European flour when you bake bread or pizza?

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The 1 kilo package of Chef/Cuoco that I bought was US $7 at a local store, so I doubt I will buy more. For the cost of 3 of those packages, I could buy 22.7 kg (50 pounds) of American-origin 00 Neopolitan-pizza-style flour.

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

When baking my 50/50 Whole wheat, white what I add a little malt, mainly because I still have some of it. 

For pizza I add 15% semolino. 

I pay € 2,39 for a kilo cuoco that is $ 2,69.