The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Meringue Flattening Out

MSR Bienenstich's picture
MSR Bienenstich

Meringue Flattening Out

When we produce our Meringue with a Kitchen Aid 4.5qt mixer, the meringue comes out fine and lasts. Now, when we use our Hobart 30qt D300T mixer, the meringue comes out fine after 25minutes of mixing, but after about two hours, it starts to run out. In the Kitchen Aid we can only produce one batch while with the Hobart we produce several batches at once. The suggar, honey, water mixture is heated to 250F when pouring in  the mixers

A) What can be happening?

B) What can be a solutions as we plan to use the 30qt Hobart more due to an increase in demand. 

Your input in were well appreciated!

 

 

pmccool's picture
pmccool

The larger mass of the 30-quart bowl may be enough that the meringue isn’t heated sufficiently.  In other words, a significant quantity of the heat in the syrup goes to warming the bowl instead of to warming the meringue. 

One way to check would be to measure the temperature of a finished batch of meringue from each mixer.  If the small batch is warmer, that would confirm this guess.  

Another guess is that it takes longer to pour the larger quantity of syrup into the mixer than it does the smaller quantity, which would allow the syrup to cool a few degrees before it is mixed in.  

A final guess is that the larger mixer simply isn’t as effective at beating air into the meringue.  

Paul

drainaps's picture
drainaps

Maybe you’re losing too much heat. Preheat the bowl with a hand torch (those with a small gas cassette, but I’m sure you know what I’m talking about) before mixing, or heat with said torch as needed while mixing the meringue. Again, Paul was spot-on in saying that a temperature take right after the batch is mixed would help you steer things in the right direction.

Needless to say, we both assume that you’re preparing the syrup to the right temperature and you’re measuring said temperature every time before mixing.

MSR Bienenstich's picture
MSR Bienenstich

many thanks for your input! The stove is about 50 feet away fron the mixer. We will move the stove closer to the mixer. I'll let you know the results!

semolina_man's picture
semolina_man

Try using a few grams of cream of tartar for a 5 quart batch, and scale this up for your larger batch.  

Also, I like to whip the egg whites to fairly firm peaks, before adding the hot sugar.  

What temperature is the meringue when it falls after 2 hours?  Weather is warming now in Europe, Asia and North America.  This can and does create problems for bakers including bread and pastry. 

 

MSR Bienenstich's picture
MSR Bienenstich

I will try the cream of tartar. Temperature is about 22 degrees celsius. We are located at 1500m above sea level. (mile high)

MSR Bienenstich's picture
MSR Bienenstich

We tried the creme of tartar; a quarter tablespoon for every two eggwhites. It did not work. The meringue came out worse! Any other suggestions?

MSR Bienenstich's picture
MSR Bienenstich

The next step will be to compare the temperature of both bowls

semolina_man's picture
semolina_man

I have made (Italian) meringue many times, and the recipe and method I use works reliably. 

The size of your batch may require different techniques.  The bowl will take alot of heat out of the ingredients.  

I would whip the whites to very firm peaks before adding the sugar.  Be sure the sugar is at the right temperature, and be sure to whip the whites until completely cool, after the cooked sugar is added.  And use lemon juice or cream of tartar.  Meringue is not difficult, there is something happening in your method. 

What is the temperature of your kitchen?  Also measure the temperature of the finished meringue.  Meringue can be frozen before use.  It doesn't freeze due to the sugar, it simply gets cold and firm, but not hard. 

semolina_man's picture
semolina_man

Hello MSR Bienenstich, 

I think 1500m elevation is a factor.  What temperature are you cooking the sugar?  I cook sugar to 121C / 250F.  At higher elevation the sugar should be cooked to approx 115C, but check it for yourself. 

Can you post your recipe? 

What type of egg whites are you using?   

retired baker's picture
retired baker

if you're taking a small recipe, typically in cups, and multiplying it for a big batch its very likely to veer way out of balance.  Better to start with a larger commercial recipe and divide down if its too big.

its done in 60 qt machines all the time with no problem , if anything it helps rather than hinders.

1 qt whites

3 lb gran sugar

pint glucose or corn syrup.

follow your usual method.