The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

More Cheese, Meat, Seafood & Carbs

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

More Cheese, Meat, Seafood & Carbs

Cheese bread continues…

 

 

Edam Cranberry SD with Sprouted White Quinoa & Sorghum

 

 

Dough flour

Final Dough

Levain

Total Dough

 

g

%

g

%

g

%

g

%

Flour (All Freshly Milled)

300

100

270

100

30

100

302.5

100

Whole White Wheat Flour

180

60

    

180

59.50

Sprouted White Quinoa Flour

60

20

    

60

19.83

Whole Sorghum Flour

60

20

    

60

19.83

White Whole Wheat Flour (Starter)

      

2.5

0.83

Whole Rye Flour (Starter)

      

2.5

0.83

         

Hydration

    

32.5

100

302.5

100.00

Water

  

270

100.00

30

100

302.5

100.00

         

Salt

4

1.33

4

1.48

  

4

1.32

Vital Wheat Gluten

7.5

2.5

7.5

2.78

  

7.5

2.48

Starter (100% Hydration)

    

5

16.67

 

 

Levain

  

65

24.07

   

 

         

Add-ins

78

26.00

78

28.89

  

78

25.79

Edam, Diced

78

26.00

78

28.89

  

78

25.79

Dried Cranberries

15

5.00

15

5.56

  

15

4.96

         

Total

  

694.5

257.22

65

216.67

694.5

229.59

Chevre Sunflower Seed SD with Sprouted Einkorn & Amaranth 

 

 

Dough flour

Final Dough

Levain

Total Dough

 

g

%

g

%

g

%

g

%

Flour (All Freshly Milled)

300

100

263

100

37

100

303

100

Whole Durum Flour

150

50

    

150

49.50

Sprouted Einkorn Flour

90

30

    

90

29.70

Whole Amaranth Flour

60

20

    

60

19.80

White Whole Wheat Flour (Starter)

      

3

0.99

Whole Rye Flour (Starter)

      

3

0.99

         

Hydration

    

40

100

243

80.20

Water

  

203

77.19

37

100

243

80.20

         

Salt

4

1.33

4

1.52

  

4

1.32

Vital Wheat Gluten

7.5

2.5

7.5

2.85

  

7.5

2.48

Starter (100% Hydration)

    

6

16.22

  

Levain

  

80

30.42

    
         

Add-ins

66

22.00

66

25.10

  

66

21.78

Bûche de Chèvre, Diced

66

22.00

66

25.10

  

66

21.78

Sunflower Seeds, Toasted

12

4.00

12

4.56

  

12

3.96

         

Total

  

623.5

237.07

80

216.22

623.5

205.78

(* For the instruction below, the numbers before and after the slash (/) are for the 1st formula and the 2nd formula respectively)




 

Sift out the bran from dough flour, reserve 30/37 g for the leaven. Soak the rest, if any, in equal amount of water taken from dough ingredients. 


Combine all leaven ingredients and let sit until ready, about 6/5 hours (25.5/25.5°C). Roughly combine all dough ingredients except for the add-ins. Ferment for a total of 5/4 hours. Mix on low for 2 minutes at the 30 and 40 minute mark. Fold in the add-ins by a set of lamination at the 50 minute mark. After the bulk, shape the dough then put in into a banneton. Retard for 8/10 hours.

Preheat the oven at 250°C/482°F. Score and spritz the dough. Remove the dough from the fridge and bake straight at 250°C/482°F with steam for 20 minutes then without steam for 25 minutes more or until the internal temperature reaches a minimum of 208°F. Let it cool for a minimum of 2 hours before slicing.

 

 

 

In my experience, hard white wheat is much weaker than red wheat. Most other wheat species, such as spelt, einkorn, durum and kumut, give rise to a stronger dough in comparison. This is contrary to popular belief but very true, for me at least.

 

 

 

For some reason, bread with amaranth browns exceptionally well. Read: it burns real fast so watch out! The bread was baked darker than usual because of this :)

 

____

 

Korean style sautéed seafoods with rice and poached egg

 

Seasoned basmati rice with pan-grilled shrimps, roasted cauliflowers, crispy chickpeas & feta cubes

 

 

Carbonara with pancetta

 

Sweet potato starch noodle salad in a black vinegar-tahini dressing + tons of seasonings (garlic, cilantro, red onions, fried shallots & Sichuan pepper)

 

Lamb chili enchiladas

 

Stir fried squid hand-pulled noodles with Korean chunjang

 

Gouda-stuffed chestnut-fed pork chop over mushroom rice

 

White bread (40% wg 60% T55): 13% each sorghum, finger millet & barley:

Quality white flour does make a difference. The aroma is evidently superior. I am convinced!

 

Comments

Benito's picture
Benito

Another smorgasbord of delicious looking and sounding food Elsie.  I love your creativity in your breads and meals.

Benny

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

and for enriching my vocabulary bank. I had never heard of the word "smorgasbord" until now :) 

Today I mixed up a simple dough, 100% whole wheat and nothing else. I honestly can't remember the last time I did that... It doesn't make sense at all but I actually felt kind of adventurous. The dough felt so different, strong, yet in an unfamiliar way. We shall see how it turns out.

Angelica Nelson's picture
Angelica Nelson

Wow finger millet!  I hadn't expected that :)  Very creative.

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

I visit carry a range of alternate grains. They have amaranth, corn, barley and various types of millet available in both the whole form and flour form. How could I possibly resist bringing some home? Even the pre-milled ones are of high quality. Fresh aroma and very finely ground. Finger millet is a particularly interesting grain to use in bread. Not sure why but the flour smells somewhat like fermented batter to me... It actually reminds me of dosa. Its flavor is more sour than sweet, resembling rye and emmer. 

Thanks for the comment!

Hotbake's picture
Hotbake

Oh all those cheese breads and delicious food🤤

I've made quite a few 100% hard red wholewheat bread since before the quarantine, because I couldn't find anything else and that's the only flour I had a lot of. Honestly thanks to panic buyers, it's nice to have something so simple and delicious again. I'm sure yours will turn out amazing 

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

with grains. There are still tens of pounds left so they should easily last me through another half a year. People here are only starting to clear the flour shelves. In the past two to three months, their focus were put on masks, sanitation items and other stables. For most people, flour was hardly the first thing that came to mind. That said, they are now switching the battlefield. Last week I headed to the bakery supplies store and it had never been so packed with people! It is a tiny shop yet there were over 20 people waiting in the queue. Even my aunt, who hadn't baked in months, began baking again. 

Hopefully the baking craze will come to an end soon as people discover other interests. It's good to see more people enjoying fresh baked goods. Yet, it is certainly problematic when there are too many of them! Glad you like the bread and thanks for the praise :)