The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Tarragon Orange Peel Edam Cheese SD

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Tarragon Orange Peel Edam Cheese SD

Back to my favourite sweet & savoury combo.

 

 

Tarragon Orange Peel Edam Cheese SD

 

 

Dough flour

Final Dough

Levain

Total Dough

 

g

%

g

%

g

%

g

%

Flour (All Freshly Milled)

300

100

268

100

32

100

305.5

100

Spelt flour

150

50

 

 

 

 

150

49.10

Sprouted Blue Emmer Flour

90

30

 

 

 

 

90

29.46

Sprouted Red Quinoa Flour

60

20

 

 

 

 

60

19.64

White Whole Wheat Flour (Starter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.5

1.80

Whole Rye Flour (Starter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.5

1.80

         

Hydration

 

 

 

 

37.5

100

290.5

95.09

Water

 

 

253

94.40

32

100

290.5

95.09

         

Salt

4

1.33

5

1.87

 

 

5

1.64

Vital Wheat Gluten

7.5

2.5

7.5

2.80

 

 

7.5

2.45

Starter (100% hydration)

 

 

 

 

11

34.38

 

 

Levain

 

 

75

27.99

 

 

 

 

         

Add-ins

72

70.00

72

26.87

 

 

72

23.57

Edam Cheese, Cubed

54

18.00

54

20.15

 

 

54

17.68

Candied Orange Peel, Diced

15

5.00

15

5.60

 

 

15

4.91

Dried Tarragon

3

1.00

3

1.12

 

 

3

0.98

         

Total

 

 

680.5

253.92

75

234.38

680.5

222.75

Sift out the bran from dough flour, reserve 32 g for the leaven. Soak the rest, if any, in equal amount of water taken from dough ingredients. 


Combine all leaven ingredients and let sit until ready, about 5 hours (21.5°C). Roughly combine all dough ingredients. Ferment for a total of 3.5 hours. Construct 2 rounds of 3 minute Rubaud mixing at the 20 and 40 minute mark. Fold in the cheese and orange peel by a set of lamination at the 50 minute mark. After the bulk fermentation, shape the dough then put in into a banneton directly. Retard in the fridge for 9 hours.

Remove the dough from the fridge 1 hour before baking. Preheat the oven at 250°C/482°F. Score and spritz the dough. Bake at 250°C/482°F with steam for 20 minutes then without steam for 25 minutes more or until the internal temperature reaches a minimum of 208°F. Let it cool for a minimum of 2 hours before slicing.

 

 

As you can see from the crumb, the bread was not proofed to the optimal level. It was a bit tough to judge the degree of fermentation with so many add-ins. Thankfully the melty cheese pockets create an illusion of holey bread :)

 

 

Tarragon is my most used spice recently. I like to add a generous pinch to most dishes for a sweet, vanilla touch. Here it pairs wonderfully with the citrusy candied peel and the salty cheese. Together with the nutty quinoa and malty emmer, they produce quite an umami loaf.   

 

____

 

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Comments

tortie-tabby's picture
tortie-tabby

I grew up there but I'm a student in Chicago now. The food you make and your plating and tableware make me homesick! My parents would looove if I cooked for them like this when I visit home.

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Although I've given up on the idea, I once considered doing postgraduate studies overseas too. Ain't going to lie, I'm really not the traveling kind of person. The thought of having to leave home for 4+ years makes me shudder... I've got to know quite a few PhD students who can only return home for a few days a year. Taking a research-based program is more exhausting in HK than, let's say, the US or Canada. There's no summer break for them. It's fine for us local students though, so I'd probably go that route! After all, how can I possibly  go that long without baking? Hmm I suppose I could carry my grain mill with me, no? :)

I can already picture your parents devouring your home cooked meal. Nothing's more comforting!

tortie-tabby's picture
tortie-tabby

If you don't mind me asking. And ah, yeah, my cousin who did graduate school in Hong Kong never got much time off. I'm impressed you mill your own grain in HK, bread-baking doesn't seem like a big hobby back there. Where do you buy the grains to mill?

Your meals are all so creative! I'm inspired.

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

as my major is Food and Nutritional Science. The most ideal case is to apply for PhD directly, that is, if I can maintain my GPA! I've learnt in the lab of two professors in the field of Dairy Science and Polyphenol respectively. This summer I'll conduct an internship in Canada. This time it's a Cereal Science lab led by a professor who studies SD! Finger crossed the epidemic would be got under control soon so that things can go as planned.

You're right that bread-baking isn't the norm here, not to mention SD-baking. East Asian seem more drawn to food with melt-in-your-mouth texture. Except me of course, who love getting a nice jaw work-out everyday. So... You probably won't be surprised at the fact that bagel is the first type of bread I've fallen in love with!

Sometimes I buy wheat and spelt locally in large-scale international supermarkets. Most of my grains are ordered online from Breadtopia though. It's certainly not cheap but otherwise, I'll be paying local bakeries 5 times the price for something far inferior. They hardly sell the sort of bread I bake anyway. There's seriously no turning back once you get a taste of good bread, not that I have any complaint or sense of remorse :) After all, where's the fun in buying store-bought bread?

Thanks for praise btw! Glad you find the post inspiring. 

tortie-tabby's picture
tortie-tabby

I love bagels!! I am really impressed you managed to make so many different kinds of bread in Hong Kong. It's true though, the bakeries in Hong Kong seem to favor the pillowy, sweet tangzhong type of bread. I haven't looked for any artisanal bakeries back home, but I should next time I'm in town. Let me know if you have any recommendations.

Angelica Nelson's picture
Angelica Nelson

How innovative, thanks for sharing!  Give my love to Hong Kong. <3

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

And thanks for the comment, Angelica! I'm posting my cooking here in the hope that someone would find it helpful. No boring meals for me, thank you... 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

And everything looks soooooo delicious!

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Appreciate your compliments as always. School has switched to online teaching so we've got to stay home a lot more. I personally loathe this teaching mode but what option do I have... At least we have lots of tasty food. Because, well, what else can one do other than cooking and baking when stuck home? Err except eating obviously :) In fact, I've been cooking lunch myself every day lately. Tasty food soothes the soul!