The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Coffee Provolone Piccante SD with 30% Sprouted Black Quinoa

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Coffee Provolone Piccante SD with 30% Sprouted Black Quinoa

I have a sudden fondness for coffee flavored baked goods lately. Nowadays, people pair cheese with not only wine and beer, but also coffee. Since wine, beer and coffee bread already exists, there’s no reason not to upgrade it by adding cheese, right? :)  

 

 

Coffee Provolone Piccante SD with 30% Sprouted Black Quinoa

 

 

Dough flour

Final Dough

Levain

Total Dough

 

g

%

g

%

g

%

g

%

Flour (All Freshly Milled)

300

100

272

100

28

100

304.5

100

Sprouted Black Quinoa Flour

90

30

 

 

 

 

90

29.56

Whole Blue Emmer Flour

60

20

 

 

 

 

60

19.70

Whole Red Wheat Flour

150

50

 

 

 

 

150

49.26

White Whole Wheat Flour (Starter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.25

0.74

Whole Rye Flour (Starter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.25

0.74

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

 

 

 

 

32.5

100

262.5

96.06

Water

 

 

230

84.56

28

100

262.5

86.21

Coffee concentrate

 

 

30

11.03

 

 

30

9.85

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

4

1.33

4

1.47

 

 

4

1.31

Vital Wheat Gluten

9

3

9

3.31

 

 

9

2.96

Starter (100% hydration)

 

 

 

 

9

32.14

 

 

Levain

 

 

65

23.90

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add-ins

66

22

66

24.26

 

 

66

21.67

Provolone Piccante

60

20

60

22.06

 

 

60

19.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coffee Concentrate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coarse Grind Coffee (I used a Mexican Arabica variety)

6

2

6

2.21

 

 

6

1.97

Hot Water

30

10

30

11.03

 

 

30

9.85

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

646 

237.5 

65 

232.14

646 

212.15

 

Sift out the bran from dough flour, reserve 28 g for the leaven. Soak the rest, if any, in equal amount of water taken from dough ingredients. 


Combine all leaven ingredients and let sit until ready, about 5 hours (24°C).

Make the coffee concentrate by brewing the coarse grind coffee in the hot water. After 5 minutes, filter the solution and discard the residue. Keep refrigerated until needed.  

Roughly combine all dough ingredients except for the cheese. Ferment for a total of 4 hours. Construct 2 rounds of 3 minute Rubaud mixing at the 30 and 40 minute mark. Fold in the cheese by a set of lamination at the 50 minute mark. Shape the dough then put in into a banneton directly. Retard for 9 hours.

Preheat the oven at 250°C/482°F. Score and spritz the dough then bake straight from the fridge at 250°C/482°F with steam for 20 minutes then without steam for 25 minutes more or until the internal temperature reaches a minimum of 208°F. Let it cool for a minimum of 2 hours before slicing.

 

 

This loaf has a moderately open crumb. Its crust is particularly thin and crispy because of the milk fat. The cheese also gives the crumb a pleasantly chewy mouthfeel. 

 

Err isn't this kind of scary looking...? 

 

The coffee flavor is rather subtle in this bread. It acts as a complement to the quinoa, intensifying its nuttiness. The savory taste of provolone, sweetness of grains and sourness of coffee & SD contribute to a well-rounded sensory profile. 

 

_____

 

 

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Pork, water chestnut & scallion dumplings in seaweed Jinhua ham broth

 

Scallion & Provolone pancakes with tuna cream cheese

 

Greek moussaka x Italian lasagna (pressure cooked pulled lamb in spiced tomato sauce, noodle sheets, sliced eggplants & cream cheese)

 

Homemade pork sausage in porcini mushroom gravy, with sautéed brussel sprouts and Pecorino masa “polenta”

 

Thai yellow chicken curry, glass noodles with shrimp oil, caramelized kabocha squash, tomatoes & scallops, shrimp paste sautéed assorted mushrooms and cabbages, and plain steamed Thai rice

 

Scallion white, garlic, sesame, seaweed & Provolone pizza with a wasabi honey glaze (SD scallion green crust)

 

Comments

theo's picture
theo

everything looks delicious!!! You're very talented Elsie.  Where do you get some of your recipes?! I would love to ty making some of these

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

not recipes. They could come from magazines, food blogs and books from all over the world. There're way too many to recommend... Most of my dishes are mashups accredited to various cooks. I'd have you believe that it's because I want to practice creativity. Yet the fact is, well, I simply couldn't make myself follow a recipe! Not strictly at least. That's part of the reason why you don't see a single dessert above.

With all that said, you're more than welcome to ask for the recipe of any of the dishes :) I understand that many feel more comfortable to cook from a recipe. Just let me know which ones you'd like! It'd be my pleasure to help. Thanks for the interest!

theo's picture
theo

you should definitely do a blog/vlog. I would love to follow you as well.  

It's hard to pick anyone but I would love to try 

"Thai yellow chicken curry, glass noodles with shrimp oil, caramelized kabocha squash, tomatoes & scallops, shrimp paste sautéed assorted mushrooms and cabbages, and plain steamed Thai rice"  Emphasis on the yellow chicken curry if youre too busy to write it all out :)

 

Thank you so much Elsie! 

 

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

The sautéed veggies are very quick to make. First, chop the cabbage and slice the mushrooms. In the cold wok/pan, add 2 cloves of minced garlic and 1-2 tsp of oil (peanut oil preferred). Infuse the oil with garlic over low heat until fragrant. Add 1-3 tsp of shrimp paste (check the sodium level) and fry in the oil for a second. Toss in the 200-300 g of assorted mushrooms and turn the heat up to medium-high. Cook until caramelized. Add 1 tbsp Shaoxing wine and 1/2 tsp white pepper. When the wine has evaporated, add the cabbage core, stir fry until softened. Put in the cabbage leaves. I prepared around 600 g of cabbage. Cover the pan/wok to let the mixture steam for a minute. Adjust the seasoning and serve. 

For the caramelized kabocha squash, tomatoes & scallops: Preheat the oven at 220°C/428°F. Toss 150 g each of sliced kabocha squash and halved cherry tomatoes with 1-2 tsp clarified butter/ghee. Bake for 15-20 minutes, until caramelized. Meanwhile, heat 2 tsp of clarified butter/ghee over medium heat. When the pan is hot, turn the heat to medium-high. Pat dry 100 g or 6 medium scallops and carefully add to the pan. Sear for 1-2 minute on each side to form a golden crust.  Arrange everything on a plate, sprinkle with flaky sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Ghee/clarified butter contributes amazing flavor here. Bacon fat, scallion oil, shrimp oil and mustard oil are also good. I'd not recommend flavorless oil.  

The other two dishes involve more ingredients and steps so I've put them in a separate file. Check out the drive document here. Hope this helps! Please feel free to ask if you face any issue or need anything else.  

theo's picture
theo

thank you so much.. cant wait to try. Ill post my results You should consider vlogging :)) 

Benito's picture
Benito

My goodness Elsie, it is incredible how good your food is!  I’m always amazed at how inventive you are and how varied your menus are!

Benny

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Wouldn't dare to call myself "inventive", I'm merely integrating elements that already exist :) It's a good skill to master for us students. That's how we avoid plagiarism when most of the ideas aren't our own. Change the order & verb forms, use synonyms, and mix up concepts of multiple sources... 

Thanks to the multicultural cuisine we're exposed to in Hong Kong, I've had a rather varied diet since young. However, the internet has to take most of the credit for it's truly broadened my culinary vision. My urge to start cooking and baking is attributed to it as well. We're so blessed to have access to all these great info for free!

Thanks again for the generous praise!

elf's picture
elf

Have you got a blog? I'd love to follow your work

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Alright, I know you're referring to a personal blog here. Nope, I haven't got one for the moment. Managing one is extremely time-demanding. This is evidenced by the fact that most popular food bloggers work full-time blogging. As a university student, time is not something I have much to spare. I've been cooking more frequently lately for we're still taking the holiday break. It'll be a different story when school starts.

Can't be sure if I'd start a personal blog someday. Yet sorry to say that it's not happening in the near future... Nevertheless, I'll keep on posting on this site so stay tuned! Glad that you like the post. Your comment is very encouraging to me. 

tortie-tabby's picture
tortie-tabby

I've tried making something like this once, but it didn't turn out especially crispy and I wasn't sure I loved the strong SD taste. Did you use a lot of oil or add more flour? Yours looks so yummy.

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Just regular baking soda leavened. I don't have much success with SD pancakes either. They always spread out way more than desired. Also, their texture is too airy and spongy, somewhat like ricotta pancakes or Japanese souffle pancakes -- not my cup of tea. I guess that's because both my starter (50% white wheat 50% rye) and flour mix are whole grain. Gluten and starch would have been excessively degraded by enzymes by the time the batter is bubbly. Oh and I don’t care for the baking powder version as well. Too cakey. Ahh right I’m sooo picky when it comes to pancakes!

These scallion pancakes were prepared according to my go-to formula, which I've been using since 4 years ago. It never failed me. The pancakes yielded are consistently thick, fluffy, moist and flavorful (at no added-fat or tablespoons of sugar!). No reason to convert everything to SD when there's a simpler and tastier alternative, right? :) Not using a starter allows more flexibility in grain choice too!

On a side note, ahem, I really should update that post...

tortie-tabby's picture
tortie-tabby

And are clearly so versatile! Seems like you've successfully made them with every possible add-in ever. I'll definitely give them a go. I got a little tired of pancakes a while back because I would keep making recipes for "fluffy" pancakes online and find them to be sort of cakey and dry.