The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Kitchenaid restore questions

Whatsername's picture
Whatsername

Kitchenaid restore questions

I recently got a Kitchenaid K5-A from my mom as a wedding/Christmas gift and I love it. I'm not sure what year it is, the speed knob moves smoothly, it hums along quietly, I've made two cookie doughs with it (I than ran out of flour) and it did a great job on both. The plug is kind of old, two prong round plug it looks like it might have been changed at some point or spliced but I can't really tell. It works fine but I worry about the lack or ground. So one of my questions is, for anyone who has done this sort of thing before, does the ground really help since it never had a ground to begin with? Also is it relatively easy to do? I have found a few videos but nothing that shows me right up close where all the wires go which for me is something I really need. Also I've been looking for a flour shield, I've read the new ones just sort of sit on the bowl and are no real help. My mom has an artisan from 2003 that has a two piece shield that snaps together and onto her bowl. I've seen some older ones that are metal I believe and others that are white plastic but I'm not sure which one of those would go with my bowl type. Is there any place that you can find these pretty steadily? Out of curiosity how many people have repainted theirs? I've got an idea I love for the paint and I've done a mock up on photoshop for how I want it to look. Thank you for any information anyone can give me. 

 

foodforthought's picture
foodforthought

I’d start by opening up the housing and inspecting how the wiring connects inside. Whoever replaced the plug may have snipped or bypassed the grounding conductor which have been pretty standard on appliances for at least 30(?) years. So best case, you’ll be able to see obvious connection points for 3 conductors from the power cord.

If you see no signs of a third wire in the cord, you can buy a molded plug 3-prong appliance cord at a good hardware store (advice there, too, maybe), building supply or Amazon. You might possibly need a replacement rubber/plastic grommet to protect the cord from wear where it passes through the housing. As far as I know, appliances are typically grounded to their chassis (where you might touch the beast during an unlikely electrical malfunction). So, in the absence of an original ground connection lug, you would attach the ground conductor to something like a mounting screw...almost anywhere other than where the two hot wires are connected. Any electrician/bakers out there who can clarify?

Phil

Doc.Dough's picture
Doc.Dough

I have a K-45 and it came with a two prong plug. It also has a mechanical speed control which can arc when it gets old.  Mine still works fine but I do make adjustments every 10 or 15 yrs.

Those old machines are great.  I would encourage you to open the gear box and see if it needs new grease.  It is probably at least 40 yrs old and while they were really well built when Hobart made them, the grease can get oxidized and park itself away from the gears.  Though if it is not making noise you might be in great shape.  Maybe it was not used much.  You can find instructions on-line on how to open it up.  And I found that parts are still available (some even better than original - though not always).

Whatsername's picture
Whatsername

No strange noises, the speed control is very smooth it has a definite click when turning it ON than seems to seamlessly slip through and has a definite click when hitting 10. I haven't made anything except cookie dough so far but my husband really wants me to make some pretzels. Would a pouring shield for a k45 work with my mixer? I know a lot of people don't use them but I personally like to. How do you adjust the speed control? Is it just like a maintenance thing if there isn't a problem? As far as the plug, I saw on a video that they suggested this cord as a replacement. Sorry for all the questions I just want to cover my bases before I have problems and keep this baby going. 

Doc.Dough's picture
Doc.Dough

As I remember, the K5A is a 5 qt mixer and the K45 is 4 1/2 qt, but I also seem to remember that the K5A has a round bottom on the bowl rather than a pedestal so the bowls could be the same diameter.  But this is something that you really need to have right and even one small difference could make it incompatible.

Again, as I remember, there is a single screw that provides adjustability on the speed control and somewhere there is a calibration procedure for setting it up. You don't need a tachometer since you can just count revolutions in one minute to measure speed. Somebody on TFL may be able to help by pointing to a source. I think I have it tucked away someplace but can't immediately find it.

 

charbono's picture
charbono

I have two K5-As.  One has the original 2-prong plug.  The other has been replaced with a 3-prong plug.

 

Camarie's picture
Camarie

 Painted mine in orange!!

 

 

 

 

Whatsername's picture
Whatsername

I love that color! I actually have a pattern from some vintage bowls that I own of Hall's China from the 40s/50s I'm not sure when I'll get to painting but what was your process? I'm looking at sanding my beater down because it's chipping has anyone done that with success? 

Camarie's picture
Camarie

I did a little sanding before I painted mine.