The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Croissant rollout woes

lennyk's picture
lennyk

Croissant rollout woes

Hello,

 

any suggestions on dealing with dough which becomes very tight to roll out after the first turn ?

I am using weekend bakery croissant 3 day recipe, have tried others also.

Using AP, tried bread flour but was even harder to roll out.

I cannot understand how I also see sheeting machines roll out dough so easily.

It is quite frustrating as I have made many attempts and not getting any consistency, some tries are very good others very bad.

I have tried the usual recommendation of "let it rest in the fridge" for a variety of times, 10, 20,30,60 mins etc

Could it be that my hydration is too low ?

Should the dough be able to do some window pane prior to first turn ?

thanks,

L

BaniJP's picture
BaniJP

There can be multiple reasons for the dough being tight:

- too low hydration (something between 50-60% is normal)

- too cold dough or butter or both (both should be cold, but still malleable)

- overmixed dough (leads to very tight gluten network, thus tight dough)

lennyk's picture
lennyk

The weekend bakery recipe is just slightly under 50% which is about same for most that I have seen.

I will try 60% and see how it goes, might just make a batch of dough and do folds without butter to see how extensible it is.

 

my ap flour is 12.5 protein also. May try dropping that.

thx

ds99303's picture
ds99303

When you initially roll out your dough, before you put add the butter block, do you have to put pressure on the rolling pin to get the dough to roll out or is the dough soft enough that you can practically stretch it out into the proper size rectangle by hand?   If it's the former, then you need to up the hydration of your dough.  Also, don't knead the dough.  The kneading will happen automatically when you do all the turns.  Kneading it too much in the beginning might make the dough too tight.

lennyk's picture
lennyk

yes it usually requires some effort.

ds99303's picture
ds99303

I looked at the recipe and with the flour to liquid ratio, it looks like it would be a rather stiff dough.  Instead of using 500 grams of flour, try 390 grams. You can always add more if you don't think it's enough.  It's easier to add more flour to a dough than it is to add more liquid.

lennyk's picture
lennyk

ok, so about 60% then

lennyk's picture
lennyk

I just mixed out a batch at the 60%, seemed quite a bit looser, might even be too wet but will see after it settles in fridge and tomorrow when I try laminating.

ds99303's picture
ds99303

Just be sure to use plenty of flour on your work surface when you roll out the the dough.  In fact, it doesn't hurt to have more than enough because all excess flour on the dough needs to be brushed off with a pastry brush before you add the butter and start the lamination process anyway. If you save that flour and keep re-using it, you'll find that very little of it actually gets worked into the dough.

chleba's picture
chleba

Hi:

Try the following?

1. Mix the initial dough less, so it just comes together

2. before you begin rolling out the folded dough, press down with the rolling pin across the dough to make an impression of the pin, beginning in the middle, go up and down, then turn the dough 90 degrees and repeat.  Turn the dough back to original, and try rolling it.

3. when it gets tough to roll, put it the covered dough back the fridge for 15-30 minutes more, then bring it out again.  You might need to let it sit at room temp for a few minutes.  Then do pressing of #2 and start rolling.  Repeat this if necessary. 

4. if you are using a dowel-type pin (without handles), make sure your hands are at the ends of the pin, and you start rolling from the middle of the dough.  Press down at and forward or backward angle. I'm new to rolling, have a dowel without handles, and had my hands placed between the middle and ends, and found it much easier once my hands moved to the ends

5. I've read somewhere that it helps to have a heavy/strong pin; I can't confirm/deny this, maybe consider this as a last resort?

I'm trying to find a video that demonstrates #2.  Okay, here is one:

https://youtu.be/9soLlXPL4zM?t=279

Purpose of video is not to show recipe, but technique of what I'm trying to say in #2 :)  Try doing that when it gets tough to roll, but careful, it might soften the butter too much.

lennyk's picture
lennyk

I have tried exactly what you say there many many times, the rest 30mins over and over until the cows come home.

chleba's picture
chleba

Are you able to roll out the dough without butter?  Try that.  Do the laminating steps without butter.  This might help us understand if it's actually the dough that's the problem.  If you are worried about waste, then just bake the resulting dough.

lennyk's picture
lennyk

Well the 60% was a no go,

a floppy mess even when cold.

will try 55% next.