The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Everything Kabocha & Other Non-Kabocha Food

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Everything Kabocha & Other Non-Kabocha Food

It’s been a month since I last posted… That's why there are bunch of food photos to share! To save time, I didn't type out the bread formulae. Do let me know if you want them though. Updated: Formula for the Kabucha SD now uploaded.

 

Kabocha Sourdough 

 

Dough flour

Final Dough

Levain

Total Dough

 

g

%

g

%

g

%

g

%

Flour

300

100

270

100

30

100

302.5

100

Bread Flour

210

70

 

 

 

 

210

69.42

Indian Atta Flour

90

30

 

 

 

 

90

29.75

White Whole Wheat Flour (Starter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.25

0.41

Whole Rye Flour (Starter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.25

0.41

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

 

 

 

 

32.5

100

239.5

79.17

Water

 

 

207

76.67

30

100

239.5

79.17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

4

1.33

5

1.85

 

 

4

1.32

Starter (100% hydration)

 

 

 

 

5

16.67

 

 

Levain

 

 

65

24.07

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add-ins

100

33.33

100

37.04

 

 

100

33.06

Roasted, Peeled & Pureed Kabocha Squash (from around 150 g raw)

100

33.33

100

37.04

 

 

100

33.06

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

647

239.63

65

216.67

647

213.88


Combine all leaven ingredients and let sit until ready, about 6 hours (26°C). 

Roughly combine all dough ingredients except the salt and levain. Autolyze for 4 hours. 

Using Rubaud mixing, incorporate the levain and salt at the 0 minute mark and 15 minute mark respectively. Construct a set of lamination at the 30 minute mark. Ferment for a total of 4 hours. 30 minutes before shaping, do a set of coil fold. Shape the dough then put in into a banneton directly. Freeze it for 1 hour before retarding in the fridge for 12 hours.

Preheat the oven at 250°C/482°F. Score and spritz the dough then bake straight from the fridge at 250°C/482°F with steam for 20 minutes then without steam for 25 minutes more or until the internal temperature reaches a minimum of 208°F. Let it cool for a minimum of 2 hours before slicing.

 

Extremely soft and sweet…

 

40% Red Fife, 30% each sprouted red quinoa and durum:

Very aromatic and has a balance of sweetness and acidity

____

 

Thai turmeric fried rice with currants and cashews

 

 

Porcini risotto with grilled chicken thigh

 

Fermented napa cabbage & tofu stir fry with plain steamed rice and a marinated soft boiled egg

 

Broccoli corn cream cheese rice pilaf with seared lamb chops

 

Grilled chicken breast tacos (75% masa harina, 25% atta) with corn & black bean salsa

 

Korean fried rice with a fried egg

 

Corn risotto with pan-fried cod

 

Broiled capelin with rava upma and ghee roasted carrots & potatoes

 

Miso poached mackerel, braised kabocha, marinated soft boiled eggs, pickled daikon radishes, pork cartilages in a black vinegar glaze, chestnut sesame rice, and sautéed veggies with sweet onions   

 

100% Kamut Kabocha pancakes

 

I know it’s getting very cold in places but here in HK, it’s only starting to feel like fall :)

 

Comments

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

All of it! And when you have time, please post the Kabocha recipe. 

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Glad to know your interest in the Kabocha bread, Danni :) Too late to bake it for Canadian Thanksgiving or Halloween... Yet do we ever need a reason to have pumpkin bread? 

Please note that I baked two different versions of the bread. The 1st time I followed the same formula posted, which had 30% whole grain. However, I used bread flour only for the 2nd time since the loaf was for my aunts. The hydration was thus around 5% lower. You can probably see the difference in colour in the crumb. All but the third photo came from the 2nd bake. Oh and getting some chili, cinnamon and nutmeg powder into the dough is a good idea too!

Thanks for the praise!

merlie's picture
merlie

oh how I wish there was a book with all your recipes in it !!!

Merlie

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Well you don't really need the book... I'm more than happy to share whichever recipe you want. All you have to do is ask :)

Thanks again for the kind words!

Angelica Nelson's picture
Angelica Nelson

Lovely food and bread.  I love the flavor of quinoa in bread. 

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

I can't help mentioning this over and over again: quinoa bread is extraordinary! When sprouted, quinoa is among my top 3 favourite grains to bake with. That's saying a lot considering how many kinds of grains and pseudo-grains I have lying at home... I prefer the black and red varieties to the white one though. White quinoa is more suitable for cooking in my opinion. It's rather mild when milled and used as flour. The kitchen smelled absolutely heavenly while the red quinoa was dehydrating!  

Thanks for the compliment, Angelica!

Benito's picture
Benito

Love Kabocha and I've never seen it in a bread before, very enticing.  Elsie all your food has me drooling right now.

Benny

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

because of its lower water content in my opinion. After roasting, it becomes even drier so the hydration wouldn't get too messed up. It's likely the most popular variety of pumpkin among Japanese bakers. Since one of its Chinese names translates to "chestnut pumpkin", I'm thinking about putting pureed roasted chestnuts in bread next :) This bread is perfect for people newly introduced to SD. It's very sweet that hopefully the acidity wouldn't be over-whelming for them. And it's almost too fragile to be cut thanks to the extreme softness. I'd even go as far as to compare it with a spongy chiffon cake! 

Glad you like the bread and food, Benny! Hope you'll come up with your own version of Kabocha bread soon!