The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Flour for Lebkuchen Dough

albacore's picture
albacore

Flour for Lebkuchen Dough

I'm about to make some long time lebkuchen dough for Christmas.

What would be the best type of flour to use for the dough? ie, rye, wheat or spelt or a mixture?

I intend to Mockmill whole grain, so also need to know whether to leave the flour as wholegrain or sifted, eg fine kitchen sieve or #40 or #50?

Lance

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Growing up we used the generic word "kuchen" for one type of cake which was a roll normally filled with chocolate. So whenever I see the word kuchen which can mean any German, or Central European, type cake it immediately conjours up this particular one. It is a Jewish version of a German/Hungarian mix cake roll.

Hopefully the recipe will give you ideas.

EDIT: Just had a look at what Lebkuchen is and now i feel silly - it's a cookie! Which is strange because kuchen means cake so I just assumed. So my comment doesn't help that much but I recommend you try it.

albacore's picture
albacore

That recipe does look good - I'm a sucker for poppy seed cakes/mohnkuchen.

Interesting the word "Hirshon" in the link; it sounds similar to the Hirschhorn/stags horn/ammonium carbonate used as a raising agent in Lebkuchen, so perhaps a link after all!

Lance

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

you can use rye 100% or any blend with wheat up to 100%.  Normally fine flour.  I personally like predominantly rye with a little spelt.  Do let the dough rest for at least a few weeks in an oiled sack or container pressing out the air, in a cold pantry or refrigerator to let the spices mingle.  :)  I also like nut flour in the dough.  Have fun :). Yum!

albacore's picture
albacore

Thanks, Mini - I knew you would provide the answer! I think I will try rye, as you say, with some spelt and wheat.

It's interesting that the French classic pain d'epice also uses an aged dough.

Lance

hanseata's picture
hanseata

If you want to make a nice spiced cookie, you can use any flour (and rye would be my favorite). But traditional German Lebkuchen are made with their usual flour for cakes and cookies, Weizenmehl Typ 450 (equivalent: pastry flour).

You can certainly use all-purpose flour, or, maybe, high extraction wheat, but other flours are not traditional.

Karin (originally from Hamburg)

albacore's picture
albacore

Thanks Karin - I might add in some typ 450 then - I can get a Polish version from my local Polish shop in the UK.

I've got my spice packet mix ready, bought on a recent trip to Germany:

I did try making my own previously, but I wasn't entirely happy with the flavour.

I see that some Lebkuchen recipes have egg in, even some of the Lagerteig ones. From a food safety point of view, I'm not sure I like the idea of an egg dough maturing for several months at room temperature.

What do you think?

Lance

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Normally there is no liquid in the dough and plenty of sugar and/or honey.  It's pretty stiff stuff.  You could pasteurize the eggs before using.  I've never found them a problem in cooler climates.  I also use the refrigerator. Now if you have warm tropics, that's another story.  I see ready made dough is already available here in Austria!!!