The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Barilla's Farina Integrale di grano Tenero--Please help..

dteplow's picture
dteplow

Barilla's Farina Integrale di grano Tenero--Please help..

I just got back to the US from a trip to northern Italy. I made bread, but didn't have a clue about what kind of whole-grain flour to buy, so I grabbed a variety of different brands and ended up loving Barilla's Farina Integrale di grano Tenero.

The bran in it is in really big flakes, so the flour has a lot of texture, which I like.

Bad news: This specific flour isn't available in the US.

Can someone help me out and explain what the heck this flour is...and how I might buy a comparable version in the New York City area?

Thanks in advance!

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

I'm sorry, I'm having difficulty parsing this. So, you bought some flour in Italy called Barilla Farina Integrale de grano Tenero and made bread there and now you want to make a comparable bread here? Is that what this is saying?


dteplow's picture
dteplow

Hi! I'm sorry I wasn't clear. Yes: I used Barilla's farina integrale de grano tenero and the bread came out great. I want to find the same kind of flour here in NY using the same kind of flour. What was special about the Barilla brand is not only the kind of wheat they used, but the grind of the flour was very "textured." That is, the bran was very course. A lot of whole wheat flour I can buy in my area is ground very fine and is very homogeneous. It is a consistent light brown with very fine bran.

I hope that makes my point more clear!

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

Someone else might be able to help you more, but you might want to think about grinding your own wheat to get what you want. Of course, the grains there are NOT the same grains here, but you might be able to reproduce something close.

 

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

And if this is the case, This is the flour? https://www.barilla.com/it-it/prodotti/farine-e-cereali/farina-integrale-di-grano-tenero

There is also this brand I see making the same named/type of flour https://www.alcenero.com/en/prodotto/farina-integrale-di-grano-tenero-biologica-1-kg/

From a video I watched last night, Soft wheat in Europe is not the same as soft in American English. So, in translating that, skip the word "soft" and think of it as just whole wheat flour.  (This is what I watched last night where I learned that: https://youtu.be/XfTkSeHZiH8

 

 

Postal Grunt's picture
Postal Grunt

Amazon carries Italian flours in its grocery and gourmet food classification. There are several different brands and types  in different weights and prices so if you're not sure of what you're looking for, be careful enough to read what they say they're offering before you fire up the VISA card for a purchase.