The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

A New & Improved Method

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

A New & Improved Method

Since I started working with white dough, I’ve come to recognize the importance of gluten development in bread. Whole grain dough tends to be stiffer even when fully hydrated, which gives a delusion that dough mixing is neglectable. Wrong. I was so wrong! Two rounds of 3 minute mixing and 1 set of lamination contributed enormous elasticity and extensibility. The dough felt completely different and it does show in the crumb.

 

 

30% Sprouted Sorghum SD

 

Dough flour

Final Dough

Levain

Total Dough

 

g

%

g

%

g

%

g

%

Flour (All Freshly Milled)

300

100

273

100

27

100

303

100

Sprouted Sorghum Flour

90

30

 

 

 

 

90

29.70

Whole Kamut Flour

105

35

 

 

 

 

105

34.65

Whole Durum Flour

105

35

 

 

 

 

105

34.65

White Whole Wheat Flour (Starter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.5

0.50

Whole Rye Flour (Starter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.5

0.50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

 

 

 

 

30

100

283.78

93.66

Water

 

 

172

63.00

27

100

202

66.67

Whey

 

 

87

31.87

 

 

87

28.71

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

5

1.67

5

1.83

 

 

5

1.65

Vital Wheat Gluten

9

3

9

3.30

 

 

9

2.97

Starter (100% hydration)

 

 

 

 

6

22.22

 

 

Levain

 

 

60

21.98

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

606

221.98

60

222.22

606

200

 

Sift out the bran from dough flour, reserve 27 g for the leaven. Soak the rest, if any, in equal amount of whey taken from dough ingredients. 


Combine all leaven ingredients and let sit until ready, about 5 hours (29.5°C). Roughly combine all dough ingredients. Ferment for a total of 4 hours (27.8°C) or until quite proofy. Construct 2 rounds of 3 minute Rubaud mixing at the 20 and 30 minute mark. Do a set of lamination at the 40 minute mark. 30 minutes before shaping, do a set of coil fold. Shape the dough then put in into a banneton directly. Freeze the dough for 30 minutes then retard in the fridge for 9 hours.

Preheat the oven at 250°C/482°F. Score and spritz the dough then bake straight from the fridge at 250°C/482°F with steam for 20 minutes then without steam for 25 minutes more or until the internal temperature reaches a minimum of 208°F. Let it cool for a minimum of 2 hours before slicing.

 


 

Sorghum tastes pretty mild. Not really much to be excited about. It makes the crumb a tad dense and dry as well… It’s too early to judge though. Let’s see how it performs in wheat/spelt dough later.

 

Last week’s bread. No freezing and thus slightly over-proofed.

 

 

Dough flour

Final Dough

Levain

Total Dough

 

g

%

g

%

g

%

g

%

Flour (All Freshly Milled)

300

100

272

100

28

100

304.5

100

Sprouted White Quinoa Flour

60

20

 

 

 

 

60

19.70

Sprouted Black Quinoa Flour

30

10

 

 

 

 

30

9.85

Whole Red Fife Wheat Flour

150

50

 

 

 

 

150

49.26

Whole Spelt Flour

60

20

 

 

 

 

60

19.70

White Whole Wheat Flour (Starter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.25

0.74

Whole Rye Flour (Starter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.25

0.74

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

 

 

 

 

32.5

100

274.1

90.02

Water

 

 

157

57.72

28

100

189.5

62.23

Whey

 

 

90

33.09

 

 

90

29.56

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

5

1.67

5

1.84

 

 

5

1.64

Vital Wheat Gluten

9

3

9

3.31

 

 

9

2.96

Starter (100% hydration)

 

 

 

 

9

32.14

 

 

Levain

 

 

65

23.90

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add-ins

54

18

54

19.85

 

 

54

17.73

Toasted Almonds

30

10

30

11.03

 

 

30

9.85

Halloumi, Cubed

24

8

24

8.82

 

 

24

7.88

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

652

239.71

65.00

232.14

652

214.12

 
Collapsed in the oven 

 

Because of the increased extensibility, there’s a higher tendency for the dough to spread out in the oven. Letting it become quite proofy before shaping improves its strength. Yet, this leads to another problem of over-proofing… Freezing it briefly before the retard helps solve the issue by lowering the dough temperature.

_____

 

Korean japchae topped with a fried egg

 

Garlicky linguine with salmon & brussel sprouts

 

Scrambled eggs with shrimps & Stir fried leeks and cabbages with steamed rice

 

Spicy grilled chicken breast with pan grilled zucchini & bell peppers, and potato rosti

 


Dry brined

 

Shrimp & spicy chorizo paella, rutabaga & leek casserole, pressure cooked pork chop braised in a tomato-carrot-onion-caperberry sauce, and pan grilled asparagus & brussel sprouts with boiled eggs & diced red peppers

 

Tomato herb (rosemary & thyme) soft bread

 

Huge thanks to my friend who kept bugging me to work the dough more :)

 

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I've never done much with sorghum except putting the syrup in stuff.  I don't usually dry rub chicken breast  until it has been wet brined first and then I leave out the salt on the rub.  Salt in dry rub just sucks the moisture out of the breast which is already pretty dry after being grilled but yours looks like turned out really juicy and perfectly cooked.

Love that shrimp and spicy chorizo paella the best - another rice dish I can't really eat but I can pick out the shrimp and chorizo:-)  The pork chops look nice an juicy too.  The instant pot is a blessing fr sure!  Just love the thing!

Everything looks grand!  Happy baking Elsie!

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

has a firm yet moist texture than I enjoy. Yes water is drawn out but it wouldn't result in a drier breast. The opposite is true in fact. I believe it works like curing meat. The final product is a springy, plump piece of ham. Wet brined breast is juicy while still having the somewhat stringy texture of traditionally cooked chicken (duh). In contrast, dry brined one tastes more like well-cooked pork chop, which is a real treat to me. Oh well maybe I just prefer pork to chicken :) I'll definitely try a marinade next time for variations. You know I can't stand feeling bored! The spices weren't rubbed on with the salt. They were pressed onto the breast right before cooking as they would have turned into a wet mess otherwise... 

The chorizo is the best part of the paella. Rather than letting them simmer with the rice, I like to add it towards the end. Usually I would first render all of the fat out over low heat. Then the aromatics get sauteed in that priceless dripping. The crispy chorizo is only added back with the seafood when the rice is 90% cooked. I also like to reserve some of it to be sprinkled over the paella. This way you have both crunchy chorizo and flavor-infused rice! Love my pressure cooker for sure. It's such a time-saver. I wouldn't be able to cook a lot of the dishes I made if it wasn't invented. 

Glad you like the food and bread dabrownman!  This way of working the dough really opens the crumb up. I'm sure its potential isn't fully unleashed yet. We shall see! 

Hotbake's picture
Hotbake

You had me at the chorizo paella...I wasn't even hungry and it's late!

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Seriously, what more can you ask for? One-pan meals like paella are such crowd pleasers! They're the kind of dishes my parents like the most too. The carbs underneath turn ultra flavorful after soaking up all the wonderful juices. I love all kinds of smoked and spiced cured meat that there're always some in my freezer... They for sure get a bad rap for being carcinogenic but a little goes a long way. 

Glad you like the paella! Maybe make some for dinner yourself considering how effortless it is? :)