The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

RWC 50% WW Sandwich Loaf v1.0

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

RWC 50% WW Sandwich Loaf v1.0

I got a bee in my bonnet the other day about making a simple loaf of 50% whole wheat sandwich bread.  Nothing special, just a good solid bread for toast, sandwiches and the like.  One thing I wanted to do was to keep the level of effort fairly minimal (somewhere just above using the bread machine....) :)  I read a bunch of different recipes, and this is what I came up with:

300g AP flour

300g Whole wheat flour

366g Water

30g Milk

1 Tbsp butter

1 Tbsp sugar

14g Salt

1.5g ADY

I mixed together the dry ingredients (including yeast), whipped the butter into the water/milk with a fork (got lots of little globules), then mixed the wet and dry together until everything was incorporated.  This was at about 9pm, and I left it in the mixing bowl, covered overnight.  At about 6am, I pulled the dough out of the bowl, and it was nice and soft, a bit puffy, and quite sticky.  With a light dusting of flour and my scraper, I pre-shaped it, then let it rest for about 30 minutes.  Then I did a final shaping, and dropped it (gently, of course) in a greased loaf pan.  It took about 3.5 hours for the dough to rise over the level of the loaf pan, at which point, I cooked it in a 425 degree oven for about 35-40 minutes (temp was 200 when I removed it.)  Let it cool, and sliced it the next day for a toast test.  Pretty tasty stuff!  Nice moist crumb, soft and tender, and very wheaty!

I'd like to get a little more loft to this one, so the next version might use a bit more flour, or a longer final rise.  Possible flavor tweaks would be to use honey instead of sugar, and maybe oil instead of butter to see what impact that might have (I'm guessing not much, they are pretty small additions anyway.)

I consider this a success -- low effort, solid sandwich loaf, and look forward to tweaking this one a bit more.  Maybe I'll even take more photos next time! ;)

Thanks for looking!

R

Comments

SeasideJess's picture
SeasideJess

Nice looking bread. I'm curious about the 14g of salt. That's the amount called for in my Laurel's Kitchen 100% WW to make two loaves of bread (900 g flour.) Is the LK recipe light on salt? Or is yours extra salty? Is it extra salty to prevent it from over fermenting overnight?

Also, forgive me but I still haven't learned the acronyms. Is ADY some kind of apple yeast water, or something else entirely?

 

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

Thanks, Jess!  I typically do 2% of the flour weight in my recipes, which would be 12g here.  I think that 1.5%-2% is pretty common.  Being 100% honest, I put in 14g by accident since I was doing too many things at once in the kitchen.  However, 2g more (or less) salt, is not at all noticeable (at least to my palate.)  I highly suspect that it had very minimal, if any, affect on the fermentation activity.  Do you notice the absence of salt in the bread you are making?  Does the flavor seem at all dull or flat?  14g of salt in 900g of flour is 1.5%, so completely within the range of normal.

ADY is Active Dry Yeast (Fleischmann's, in this case.)

Rich

SeasideJess's picture
SeasideJess

I'm not sure if I have noticed the lack of salt in my recipe, but the bread could taste ... bigger?  I don't know. I'm comparing it to my favorite bread, which is the Holy Moly from Companion Bakeshop. This is a very unfair comparison since the Holy Moly is a seeded sourdough and my bread is a plain whole wheat raised with instant yeast and only a little CLAS.  For my next loaf I will increase the salt and also increase the CLAS. Cautiously. Just a little bit. I want to increase flavor and hydration both, and the CLAS will do that since it is at 190% hydration. It will also add rye, which may make the dough behave unpredictably.

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

Sounds like a good plan, Jess.  Small changes, and as few of them as possible at a time so you can really determine the difference each one brings.

Tough to compare a plain white loaf to a seeded sourdough! :)

Rich

SeasideJess's picture
SeasideJess

Both of the loaves are 100% whole wheat, but that is the only similarity. Mine is panned, lower hydration, yeast risen, and enriched with honey and EVOO and flavored with CLAS. Theirs is a free shaped batard sourdough, seeded, enrichments and flavorings unknown (although I think they may be using molasses).

That loaf is like the Holy Grail of bread. Holy Moly is the right name for sure. The crust is thin, crisp, deeply colored, and the crumb is tender, cool, lustrous, chewy, and utterly delicious. Sigh. Well, it's good to have something to aspire to, right?