The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

A Genesis Style Sourdough Bread

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

A Genesis Style Sourdough Bread

 

When I began making bread a few years ago it was with a determination to bake nutritious and wholesome bread. What I did not fully understand or appreciate is the broad scope and variety, the many variables affecting the process, the simple and complex beauty of a well baked loaf of bread. And when I think of the countless varations of bread baked over thousands of years it is humbling to realize that each loaf I bake has very likely been baked before by someone else at another time. This was eloquently expressed in a blog comment by Andy (Syd-a) some years ago on TFL:

"I suppose the beauty in bread baking is often not the novelty but in the reproduction in as much a beautiful or faithful way to the old recipes and to add your own personal style to it.  I did nothing new with my baking today, but have made some ok bread...but nothing that hasn't been done by greater bakers previously." 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/34207/bread-according-ezekiel-49#comment-262728 

So, for today's bake, I too did nothing new but have made some ok bread... nothing that hasn't been done by greater bakers previously!

Turns out my idea for today's multigrain, multiseed sourdough bread has been done before by a bakery called Food for Life; they bake Ezekial Bread  (versions of this previously baked/posted by others on TFL; I baked a loaf a few weeks ago to see what it was like; it was ok) and a multigrain Genesis Bread - my bread today is a similar combination of sprouted and fresh milled grains, much the same ingredients but a different approach, as Andy says,  "....reproduction in as much a beautiful or faithful way to the old recipes and to add your own personal style to it"

I mixed and autolysed fresh milled, whole grain, organic rye, spelt, Marquis flour with organic white flour; then added sea salt and a young levain to start the bulk fermentation. After the first hour I added a porridge of cooked ground chia, millet, amaranth, quinoa, hemp, flax, sesame, cashews, almonds, basmati rice, steel cut oats, yellow corn, yellow peas, a soaker of coarse cracked pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, buckwheat and some mashed sprouted barley, oats, khorasan.  I estimate the FDH at 80%.  I cold proofed the loaves overnight and baked directly out of the fridge in pre-heated Creusets; covered 500 F for 25 minutes, 450 F for 10 minutes and uncovered 450 F for 20 minutes to finish.  I like this bread - it is on my short, short list at the top.

 

 

 

 

Comments

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

Wow all but the kitchen sink , as they say! You hit the mark on this bake for sure. Gorgeous crust and crumb. I bet the fragrance and flavor are delicious. I’ve yet to sprout anything. I have a problem eating any seeds even if ground so I shall enjoy your bake in pictures only unfortunately. Happy baking c

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Thanks for your comments Caroline and you're right about the kitchen sink, everything but!  I was wondering about how heavy, dense this bread would turn out with all the stuff added but the crumb is fairly light and tender and the crust really thin and crispy, very nice flavour. If you haven't tried sprouting anything I encourage you to try it - sprouted grain additions, mashed, dried and milled - I am pretty sure you will enjoy whatever sprouted bread you decide to bake.  Looking forward to your next bake!

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

The porridge and soakers alone would have been complete meals in themselves, but baked into bread -- I get goosebumps just thinking about it. That has got to be one nutritious loaf. And a beauty to behold.

Enjoy it and keep on baking!

Carole

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Well, I am not a nutrtionist Carole but intuitively I think the nutritional profile for a bread like this, made with fresh milled organic whole grain flour and additions, naturally leavened and slow-proofed, should be pretty solid, yes? And a nice bonus is that for something that is good for you, it tastes pretty good too.  Thanks for having a look Carole, will be watching for your further bread baking adventures!

Filomatic's picture
Filomatic

If I ever make a loaf this beautiful I will die happy.  What was the flavor like with such a diverse array of porridge ingredients?

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Hi Phil,

Thanks for your kind comments. I think you would enjoy this bread, the crumb isn't too heavy or dense despite all the additions and the taste...it is a nice deep, toasty, nutty flavour.  Surprising to me, the crust is different from any other bread I have baked thus far, perhaps because of the different oils, sugars in the additions; very thin, crisp but really tender and falls apart as you chew the bread. Hope all is well with you and you're baking lots of good bread!

David

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

You made an "ok" bread today..

I think the beautiful rise, design and score are.. ok

I think those insane blisters are.. ok

And that even, open, fluffy looking developed crumb.. yeah, it's ok too..

Oh.. and that crunchy looking crust.. also ok.. :)

 

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Thanks Bread1965, I agree with you, you're absolutely right...ok is ok!  

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

And the flavour must be incredible! 

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Hey Danni, I think you would like this bread, it's very tasty. Not the kind of bread that highlights the subtle flavour of any particular wheat or grain. I didn't taste any particular individual ingredient flavour more than another but whatever happened in the mix, that overall flavour is pretty good.  Hope you're well and enjoying some nice warm Spring weather in TB!

David

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

here.  Beautiful.  

Mini

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Thank you Mini!

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

The crust, the crumb and the spring! The ingredients might look similar but Food for Life is making sandwich loaves instead... I'd much prefer the texture of your loaf :)

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

You're right Elsie. I think the Food for Life folks are trying to make a better quality bread than other breads available in the marketplace but it is still commercial bread, production baking for the masses.  The "problem" for us is once you have enjoyed home baked bread there is no going back to commercial bread, it just doesn't work anymore.  Thanks for having a look, hope you're well and look forward to your next post!