The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Crusty Kamut Rolls - For the Love of Ancient Grains

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Crusty Kamut Rolls - For the Love of Ancient Grains

A while ago, A&B Naturals, the local store that sells my breads on weekends, let me know that the "lunch crowd" were hungry for some nice rolls to go with their smoothies.

Since I like trying out new things and find it rather boring to always bake the same breads, I jumped at the chance to test some new recipes for rolls that had been on my to-do list for a long time.

Viewing my flour supplies, I decided to go with kamut, an ancient wheat with a lovely golden color and delicate, nutty taste.

Adapted from a recipe of one of my bread baking heroes, Richard Ploner, the crusty rolls surpassed my expectations - and "the lunch crowd" at A&B's loved them, too!

The kamut flour is soaked for 24 hours, and, for optimal taste (and least hands-on work), I allow the dough to slowly ferment overnight in the fridge. Therefore, plan on starting the preparation 2 days before you want to bake.

For the recipe and procedure, please, follow me on my blog "Brot & Bread"

Comments

Truth Serum's picture
Truth Serum

Its interesting how the ancient grains need such a different treatment.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I attended a seminar on baking with Einkorn by Eli Rogosa ("Restoring Heritage Grains") at the Kneading Conference 2 years ago.

She talked about the importance of overnight soaking of the grains to break down anti-nutrient phytates. She also recommended a long cold bulk ferment to enhance the flavor and help to fully incorporate butter or oil, since Einkorn and other ancient grains absorb liquids and fats slower than modern wheat.

I bulk ferment almost all my doughs in the refrigerator overnight, to better fit my schedule and to enhance the flavor, and don't like long kneading. It was interesting to learn that there is a good reason to do it, especially for ancient grains with their more delicate gluten structure.

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

The crumb on those look beautiful as well, Karin. I agree with Truth Serum that it is a fascinating way to approach the khorasan (or kamut) flour with a long hot soaker and a long cold ferment. Just wondering whether you have tried this technique with any other grains, perhaps spelt or einkorn?

-Brad

hanseata's picture
hanseata

A long cold fermentation, yes, because that is, what I always do - ancient grains or not. A hot soaker I rarely use, more often with very hard grains, like cracked rye or polenta.

Karin

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Durum in all of bread of late and love the sweetness and color it lends to the bread.  These are really nice examples fo the perfect Easter Roll! I can see home made Dijon smeared on these and slices of ham snuggled in there.  Lovely.

It is a perfect marketing ploy but Khorasan / Kamut probably isn't an ancient grain like Durum, Emmer, spelt and Einkorn.  DNA testing says it is most likely a natural cross of T. durum and T. polonicum so durum had to come first.  Still, it is at least and old natural grain that is super high in protein and amino acids and then there is that lovely yellow color too.  Today it is still grown in Iran for....camel feed!   Well done and 

Happy baking Karin.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

indeed, and all the extra ones I baked for us are devoured. Yes, I read about the clever marketing of the Kamut, but it tastes nice and nutty, and is not a modern high-yield wheat. I'm sure the camels appreciate the good taste, too.

Take care, old friend.

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and baked with Kamut! Lovely and beautiful! Kat

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Do try them!

Karin