The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Black Forest Chocolate Cherry Sourdough Loaf

albacore's picture
albacore

Black Forest Chocolate Cherry Sourdough Loaf

I recently chanced upon an interesting recipe in the excellent Baecker Suepke's blog.

It is for a Black Forest chocolate cherry sourdough bread. The Modernist Bread version springs to mind, but the Black Forest one is different - not sweet, apart from the cherries - and it has toasted sunflower and pumpkin seeds. I also added some non-salted pistachio seed, which gave a rather nice contrasting green colour.

Interestingly, the recipe predates the Modernist Bread one by a couple of years. You can find the recipe HERE. It's in German, but translates successfully. There's also a variant recipe here which I didn't use, but it has a few different tweaks.

The recipe is quite complex, with a soaker, a levain and an "aroma cook piece" (Aroma Kochstück) and various grades of wheat and rye meals. I approximated these with my Mockmill. The recipe also calls for light rye flour T997. I made this by putting wholegrain rye through a #50 sieve.

Here's how the loaf looked after baking:

And here's the crumb:

The crumb and flavour remind me of a "pumpernickel on steroids". It really is bursting with flavour and I can recommend it to all who fancy an  interesting bake, albeit with some complexity.

My favourite pairing was with some good French brie; I shall be baking it again!

Lance

Comments

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

That's got my taste buds all a-twitter!  Looks absolutely delicious. 

Enjoy it and keep on baking!

Carole 

albacore's picture
albacore

Thanks Carole - you should give it a try!

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

what time should I pop over?

Seriously, that's quite a bit over my head at the moment, but it does look very, very yummy.

 

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

and I have a couple questions. I looked at your links and used the translating button. Is the Aroma made with diastatic  malt or non-diastatic malt ? Do you then toast it there as well as later in the recipe ? I see the malt appears again in the dough . What sort of yeast is intended ? Fresh and if so what amount would I use of dry yeast here in the US ? Is the Aroma a sort of Tangzhong in this bread ? Oh and what are wheat grits ?  Thank you and sorry for all the questions !   Lovely and intriguing bread. I look forward to trying more from that blog. c

albacore's picture
albacore

No problem for the questions and I'm pleased you are having a go!

Here's some answers:

  1. The aroma piece is made with diastatic malt flour; I used Diax, from Bakery Bits UK, but any light coloured malt flour should work. If you look at the second recipe link, they make the aroma piece in a slightly different way, with more water and malt and heating up more slowly with a long rest at 60C - Brewers' mashing temperature, no doubt to get the rye meal converted to sugars.
    I might try this next time, but it will make a sweeter bread. I'd just follow the original for a first go, but heat up gently. I used a very small non-stick saucepan.
  2. The malt later in the recipe is Roggenröstmalz - roasted rye malt; just for flavour and colour, non-diastatic. I used red barley malt flour, again from Bakery Bits, but you could improvise by home malting some grain, drying and roasting. I think other TFLers have gone this route before, usually when making one of those Borodinsky type rye loaves, or try a home brew shop. There again, there's only 4g, so it's not the end of the world if you miss it out.
  3. German bakers like to use fresh yeast, and I did use it, but you could use IDY. Most use a factor of 0.33x, but I prefer 0.4x, so 4g. I also like to cream it with some 40C water before use, but that's just me!
  4. I don't think the aroma piece is equivalent to a Tangzhong. It's more to give sweetness.
  5. Wheat grits - "Weizenschrot mittel" - I took to be medium wheat meal. I wound the Mockmill adjuster fully round 2 or 3 times to get this.
  6. Not one of your questions, but a tip: I determined that final proof was complete and the loaf was ready to bake when I started to see cracks in the surface of the loaf - approx 1 hour.

Yes, lots of good recipes on Bäcker Süpke's blog. Here's a few more I shall be making soon (so many bakes to try, so little time to do them all!): (1) (2) (3) (4)

Let us know how you get on!

Lance

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

i have diastatic malt flour but no non- diastatic so will venture a try at making some. Been meaning to do so anyway. Thanks for the clarification on the yeast. I also always wet my ADY before using as I use it very infrequently. For the wheat grits you just mean opening the stones to get a coarser grind ? The cereal Cream of Wheat was very popular when I was a child in the ‘50’s😊. It is the equivalent to the Southern grits that I now prefer. Thanks for the tips and the rising caution . Will post when I get the bread made. You are right so many breads so little time. I started baking weekly in 1977 and haven’t begun to make all I would like to try! c

albacore's picture
albacore

Yes, just open up the stones. Don't know if you have a Mockmill, but you reach the anticlockwise end of the lever travel before the stones are wide enough, so you have to slacken off the plastic nut, wind the lever clockwise to the stop, tighten the nut and probably repeat at least once before grinding. You are looking for something fairly coarse.

I am guilty of not making the same bread too many times (apart from a few favourites), as I always want to try something new. Breaking all the rules, I know!

 

Lance