The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

bulgur scald creates sticky crumb?

copynumbervariant's picture
copynumbervariant

bulgur scald creates sticky crumb?

I made a sourdough loaf with a bulgur scald, with 1 and 2/3 times the amount of water as bulgur. There was 125 g of dry bulgur in 1 kg total of dough. I baked it for an hour at about 400, but I can't tell all that well because it's a grill. I've baked other 1 kg loaves without bulgur this way that came out well.

The crumb is so sticky it sticks to the bread knife. I guess some of the moisture in the bulgur got absorbed by the bread after baking, possibly. Is this a normal thing for bread with a fair amount of soaker or scald? (1/3 of the total dough weight was the scald in this case.) It tastes good, but should I worry about mold? My other thought is that kneading could have released too much of the gelatinized starch from the bulgur, and I could essentially have a loaf made with too much tangzhong. The dough without the scald was 70% hydration, but while stretching and folding it felt stiffer, more like 65%.

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

before cutting into the loaf? If you cut into it before the moisture has a chance to redistribute itself evenly throughout the loaf, the crumb can get gummy. 

But that being said, with very moist add-ins like soaked Bulgur, you do end up with a very hydrated loaf after baking. I just wash off my knife after every few slices if it is an issue. Oh and the loaf did not go moldy any faster than drier loaves. 

copynumbervariant's picture
copynumbervariant

And then, as you predict, I cut into it later, about 24 hours after baking, and everything was much less gummy. Either way, I like it, I just had never had bread like this. Reassuring to hear it doesn't mold faster. I read elsewhere it might actually take longer to go stale. Not that I'll have any left in a couple days.