The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

100% whole wheat freshly milled... sandwich loaf

ricman's picture
ricman

100% whole wheat freshly milled... sandwich loaf

This is a very light and fluffy 100% whole wheat sandwich loaf.

100 grams starter at a 100% hydration

500 grams fresh milled whole wheat flour(red winter wheat)

400 grams water...adjust as necessary

10 grams salt.

30 grams of honey

50 grams of oil/butter...whatever's handy

2 teaspoons yeast

 

Mix starter, flour and water and autolyse for 30 minutes... add salt, honey, oil and yeast. I mixed these two loaves in my KA mixer for about 15 minutes until I achieved a nice windowpane. Cover and let rise for an hour or until doubled. Punch down and divide dough and shape into loaves place into bread pans, cover and let rise until dough domes 1 inch over the side of bread pans...took 40 minutes today...my pans are 9" x 5"...I bake from a cold oven set at 350 degrees for 40 minutes.

My grain mill is a vintage Mill & Mix and produces a very fine flour which I believe helps with the lightness of the loaf. The resulting loaf is super light and fluffy, it took me many attempts to produce a light loaf with freshly milled 100% whole wheat. It may not work for everyone, its just what works for me.

 

Cheers,

Rick

 

 

 

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

Rick,  those loaves do look pretty good for 100% whole wheat.  Thanks for the write up. 

gwschenk's picture
gwschenk

They look nicely baked.

Justanoldguy's picture
Justanoldguy

Nice loaves. It seems that your hydration is around 80% given the numbers you're showing. How easily does that dough handle? 

ricman's picture
ricman

I believe the freshly milled flour absorbs more water. The dough handles easily and for me is not sticky or hard to handle.

 

Cheers,

Rick

Justanoldguy's picture
Justanoldguy

I'm working with almost identical proportions of starter, freshly milled flour, salt, honey or molasses, and yeast but I keep my hydration down around 66% and use about half the amount of fat you use. My autolyze is about twice your time and I add a small amount, 1/2 tsp, of ascorbic acid. I do end up with a denser, single loaf - something I prefer and understand that others don't for sandwich loaves. So, I suppose all doughs lead to loaves, to borrow a well worn cliché.  

Filomatic's picture
Filomatic

Very impressive result for whole grains.  Nicely done!

RigoJancsi's picture
RigoJancsi

Looks very good. Nice crumb without vital wheat gluten

franbaker's picture
franbaker

I think it might be just what my son would like -- and I'd like it, too! Bookmarking it for trying in the near future :-)