The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

20% buckwheat bread

joc1954's picture
joc1954

20% buckwheat bread

This bread contains 20% of buckwheat flour and 80% of strong bread flour (in my case it was Italian Costa d'Amalfi).

 

Hydration about 75% and cold retarded.

The procedure is as follows: slightly roast the buckwheat flour in a pan until starts smelling and then scald it with all water from the recipe, wait until it cools down and then add bread flour, salt and starter and mix by hand until all ingredients are well incorporated. After 30 minutes rest period use scoop & stretch method or French slaps and develop gluten and then perform stretch & folds every hour until you are through bulk fermentation. I shape it using stitching method and the cold retard and bake it as you bake any other sourdough bread.

You can add walnuts or pecans, what gives this  bread even more taste.

Happy baking!

Joze 

Comments

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

That bread is just beautiful and I love that open crumb! I haven't tried scalding or doing a roux yet. That will be in my future sometime. I am bookmarking this. Well done!

joc1954's picture
joc1954

Thanks Danni, you are way too kind. I frequently use scalding for gluten free flours like corn, millet, teff,..., and buckwheat is not an exception.  Most of the recipes we use in Slovenia for preparing buckwheat bread call for scalding. 

Happy baking!

Joze

 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

Did you mill the buckwheat yourself or is it commercial buckwheat flour.  it looks so good I am very tempted!

Leslie

joc1954's picture
joc1954

Thanks Leslie! I frequently mill by myself, but this time I did not. Most of the mills in Slovenia offer stone milled buckwheat so there is almost not difference in granularity if you mill it at home with a big difference, that is more tasty as it is freshly milled. Go ahead and try it, with 20% of buckwheat you get a lot of flavour but at the same time it does not ruin the aesthetic qualities of the loaf.

Happy baking,

Joze

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

I am so interested in seeing people using all these different flours....once I am a bit more confident I shall try other flours...Look beautiful! Kat

joc1954's picture
joc1954

Thanks Kat, and yes, you should use or better say mix different flours which add so much taste to the bread. Adding small quantities up to 20% or even 30% will not have a big impact on the aesthetic properties of the loaf. So start with maybe 10% and see. Only 10% of added buckwheat flour will dramatically change the taste of the bread.

Happy baking,

Joze  

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

First we drey fry the flour snd then we scald the heck out of it with boiling wayer😀  sounds like something Lucy would want to do next time she is in a torture mood. The resorts are spectacular for sure! Well done and happy baking Joc

joc1954's picture
joc1954

Thanks Dabrownman for your comment and nice to hear from you after a long time.  The fault is on my side as I was not very active for a while here at TFL. Buckwheat is one of the most popular flours used for bread making in Slovenia and we have a very strong tradition in producing it. Especially buckwheat bread with walnuts is extremely popular. In now days when many people are gluten intolerant the buckwheat is getting even more popularity as gluten free flour.

You should try something like this in one of your next bakes and I bet Lucy will be very happy!

Happy baking,

Joze   

gillpugh's picture
gillpugh

This is a wonderful looking loaf and - yes- I have some buckwheat flour here, so guess what I will be baking this weekend.

This is my problem, i should stick to a basic loaf and then move on when I've mastered that, but I get side- tracked by the beautiful loaves I see here. 

joc1954's picture
joc1954

Thanks gillpugh and welcome to the club, I have the same problem as you have. But this bread is not a big "detour", its like any other bread with a bit of a gluten free buckwheat flour added which should be scalded if possible. The rest is like any other bread that you make. 

Good luck with your experiment! and happy baking!
Joze

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Love that scalding technique.  I have not done that in quite some time so will have to work this into a bake soon.  Great looking open and moist crumb on this one too.

Regards,
Ian

joc1954's picture
joc1954

Thanks Ian and you should give a try. I think I remember some of your breads with scalded flour if I recall correctly. 

Happy baking,

Joze

 

gillpugh's picture
gillpugh

Joze - how much water to flour do you use when you use a scalding technique ?  In the end I have just added  dry buckwheat flour  and toasted groats.  I would imagine that the scalding method will produce a quite different loaf.  

joc1954's picture
joc1954

It is hard to say what I do every time as I usually experiment and try different quantities. But for this bread I just used all the water from the recipe for scalding what was probably not normal. I always hate when after scalding I have to deal with all those lumps so I decided to use all the water and then adjust hydration by adding some more water if the dough would be too stiff.

Generally speaking I would say that I use the boiling water in quantity of about 1/3 of the weight of that particular flour which I am scalding. But I almost always deviate from this rule :-) 

Sometimes I prepare tang-zhong or water roux instead of scalding where I slightly adjust the method so I use more than 5% of overall flour and less than 500% of water (5 times the weight of the flour included in tang-zhong preparation). For instance if  I would use 100g of buckwheat flour I would  prepare water roux with only about 300% of water - so 300g and cook it until the starches start to gelatinise at about 65 dC. With scalding you always use  water in quantity from 1/5 to 1/3 of the wight of flour.  

Hope this will help you and happy baking!

Joze

gillpugh's picture
gillpugh

Attempted to make some buckwheat bread yesterday, but as I failed to make a scald as I had already starter the bread before I saw you answer Joze! No patience that's my problem. The bread only has 5% of buckwheat flour, not roasted, and I added 15% of toasted groats.  The final loaf doesn't have any obvious flavour tastes, so I need to add more toasted buckwheat flour next time .  Also crust looked thin, but it wasn't crackly or tasty.  Back to the drawing board.   

joc1954's picture
joc1954

I would suggest 20% of added buckwheat flour slightly roasted and then scalded to get very pronounced buckwheat taste.  I am aware of the problem that the intensity of taste can vary a lot from flour to flour, so you must also take this into account. Your crumb looks awesome so I have no doubt that next time you will nail it.

Happy baking,

Joze